Pater Gratia Oriental Art

Sold Ceramics

 

Sold Chinese wares over-decorated in the West 1700-1800

 

Dutch over-decorated Amsterdams Bont

 

Page 1

Classifying European over-decorated Chinese export porcelain into the well known and easily identifiable styles of Imari and Kakiemon, famille verte and famille rose is a convenient way of relating the decoration to its origins and grouping pieces for discussion. Many items fall comfortably into their alloted categories but others are decorated with mixed Japanese and Chinese motifs that could all be classified as Chinoiserie hence their classification is somewhat subjective. (Espir 2005, p.73)

 

Sold Ceramics - Sold Chinese wares over-decorated in the West 1700-1800 - Dutch over-decorated Amsterdams Bont are categorized in the following order:

  • House of Orange
  • Imari Designs
  • Kakiemon Designs
  • Famille Verte Designs
  • Famille Rose Designs
  • Chinoiserie / Japonaiserie Designs
  • Flowerbasket and a Fisherman by a Sentry House
  • Other Designs

 

Sold House of Orange

2010404
2010404

Sold Ceramics - Sold Chinese wares over-decorated in the West 1700-1800 - Dutch over-decorated Amsterdams Bont - House of Orange - Page 1

 

Object 2010404

 

Bowl

 

China


c.1730, over-decorated in the Netherlands, Amsterdams Bont, c.1734 or later to commemorate the marriage in 1734 of prince William IV of Orange-Nassau and Princess Anne, Princess Royal of England. Her diamond necklace was a wedding present from her husband.

 

Height 73 mm (2.87 inch), diameter of rim 150 mm (5.91 inch), diameter of footring 67 mm (2.63 inch)

 

Bowl on footring, straight rim. Decorated in underglaze blue with a taihu (garden) rock and bamboo trees growing from behind a fence. On the bottom a single flower spray. Over-decorated in iron-red, black, gold and other overglaze enamels, in the Netherlands, Amsterdams Bont c.1743 with a fruiting orange tree flanked by two head and shoulder portraits of William IV, Prince of Orange-Nassau (1 September 1711 – 22 October 1751), born Willem Karel Hendrik Friso and Anne of Hanover Princess Royal, and Princess of Orange. Prince William is wearing the badge and blue sash of the Order of the Garter to which he had been nominated on 12th June 1733, and a wig whose long flowing locks conceal his crooked back. Princess Anee is wearing the diamond necklace that was her wedding present. Their names; Ps (Princess), Anna (Anne), Ps (Prince), W (Willem), C (Carel), H (Hendrik), F (Friso). are inscribed above them. On the opposite side flowering trees growing from behind a fence. On the sides and bottom floral sprays. 

 

Since the establishment of the United Provinces in 1579 powerful members of the Orange-Nassau family had governed as Stadholders in the various provinces. In the 17th century their status had been raised by two marriages into the English royal family; in 1641, William II, (1626-1650), son of Prince Frederick Henry, (1584-1647), married Mary Stuart, daughter of Charles I; in 1677, their son, William III, (1650-1702), married Mary Stuart, (1662-1695), daughter of James, Duke of York, Later King James II. In 1689 William III and Mary succeeded to the throne of England. They had no children and after William's death the title of Prince of Orange-Nassau passed to Johan Willem Friso, (1687-1711), Stadholder of the northern provinces of Friesland and Groningen. This was inherited by his son Willem Carel Hendrik Friso, Prince William IV of Orange-Nassau, (1711-1751), an intelligent and courageous man whose ambition was to gain the position of Stadholder over all Seven Provinces. In 1734 he married Princess Anne, the Princess Royal, (1709-1759), daughter of George II, Hanoverian King of England, an event commemorated on delftware and Chinese porcelain. Although this is the first time that Dutch decorators had used Chinese porcelain to commemorate members of the House of Orange, it was part of a continuing tradition dating back to William the Silent (1533-1584) in which Orange-Nassau coats of arms and portraits were impressed or painted on German stoneware and delftware both in the Dutch Republic and England. (Espir 2005, pp.161-162) 

  

Willem IV was the first hereditary 'stadhouder' of the Netherlands. On 14th March 1734 Prince William IV of Orange-Nassau married Princess Anne, the Royal Princess and Princess of Orange, eldest daughter of King George II of Great Britain and Caroline of Ansbach in the French Chapel at St. James's Palace attented by the royal family and four thousand guests. William and Anne had five children. (Espir 2005, p.163) 

 

The source of the portrait of Prince William was perhaps a painting in 1733 by Jacob Schalken (1683-1733) of William in noble profile facing left wearing the sash and badge of the Order of the Garter and holding a heavy staff of office in his right hand. But a similar portrait was painted by Philips van Dyk in 1734 which was copied in mezzotint in 1735 by J. Faber and engraved by Ph. Endlig. As for Princess Anne, in 1734, Philip Mercier painted two portraits of her in a low cut heavily bejewelled dress, probably her wedding dress, with jewels in her hair. On one she is in profile wearing the diamond necklace, copied in mezzotint by J. Faber, and on the other she is turning to the front, but without the necklace, copied by an unknown engraver. The half-turned image with the necklace appears to be a combination of the two portraits but may derive from an as yet unidentified painting. (Espir 2005, p.164) 

 

For similarly shaped, sized and over-decorated bowls, please see:

Condition: Restored.

 

References:

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1966, cat. 338

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1977, cat. 312

Hervouët 1986, cat. 16.76

Espir 2005, pp.161-164 & cat. 12

Emden 2015/1, cat. 123

Emden 2015/2, cat. 123

Salisbury, 2014, cat. 315

 

Price: Sold.

 

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201015
201015

Sold Ceramics - Sold Chinese wares over-decorated in the West 1700-1800 - Dutch over-decorated Amsterdams Bont - House of Orange - Page 1

 

Object 201015

 

Bowl

 

China

1740-1750, over-decorated in the Netherlands 1750-1770

 

Height 67 mm (2.64 inch), diameter of rim 143 mm (5.63 inch), diameter of footring 65 mm (2.56 inch)

 

Bowl on footring with steeply rounded sides and a straight rim. Decorated in underglaze blue with panels filled with flowering plants, round the rim (outer and inner) a diaper pattern border, on the base a flower spray. Over-decorated in iron red, black, gold and other overglaze enamels, in the Netherlands, Amsterdams Bont c.1750-1770 with the 'Cherry Picker' design a man in a windswept coat and black breeches standing on a ladder and picking fruit from heavy laden branches and a lady and a gentleman seated on a wall enjoying a basket of fruit in two large panels seperated by two smaller panels with a fisherman by a sentry house. On the bottom a flower basket with ribbons and insects and on the sides and rim flower sprays and stylized flower heads.

 

Although politically the Seven Provinces were united as a Republic, the House of Orange had many loyal supporters. Portraits and coats of arms of the princely couple may not have been the only form of pro-Orange propaganda. The very popular design on this teacup and saucer is known as 'The Cherry Picker' or 'The Apple Picker'. The pattern is in two parts: the man up the ladder gathering the fruit and the loving couple sitting enjoying the basket of fruit. Although many Dutch people today insist that the subject is simply an erotic story of stolen fruit, the size of the 'cheries' or 'apples' on the trees has led others, including W.W. Winkworth, Stephan Hartog and myself to question whether they could be oranges, and whether the couple although lacking the trappings of royalty, could represent Prince William and Princess Anne enjoying marital harmony. (Espir 2005, p.165)   

 

Litzenbug states that this design was possibly inspired by the work of Jacopo Amigoni (1685-1752), whose engravings were widely copied onto European ceramics and Chinese export porcelain. Closely related variants are known on eighteenth-century Dutch earthenware. Similar scenes were painted by Nicolas Lancret (1690-1743), Jean Antoine Watteau (1684-1721), and François Boucher (1703-1770). (Litzenburg 2003, p.165 & p.261)

 

Groeneweg states that in the collection of the Victoria & Albert Museum in London the same 'Cherry Picker' design - as on this bowl - is already found on a Dutch Delftware spittoon, dated on the rim "1747" and marked "MVP". (V&A inv. C.23371910).

 

Espir states that the design is traditionally thought to be merely an erotic allusion to stolen fruit. Another theory is that the fruit in the tree are actually oranges, and the figures are actually Willem IV and Anne of Hanover Princess Royal, and Princess of Orange.

 

Bowls with these combined designs executed in Amsterdams Bont are not rare in the Netherlands the quality of the decoration is not often very refined.

 

For other objects over-decorated with both designs, please see:

Condition: Perfect.

 

References:

Honey 1944, Plate 139

Goldsmith Phillips 1956, plate 60

Beurdeley 1962, Fig. 27, 28 & 29

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1966, cat. 204

Park 1973, cat. 22, 23 & 24

Gordon 1977, cat. 63

Jörg 1982/1, cat. 48

Hervouët 1986, cat. 4.23, 16.21 & 16.233

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1989, cat. 191

London 1990, lot 173

London 2002, lot 444

Litzenburg 2003, p.165 & p.261 & cat 160

Espir 2005, p.165 & cat. 13

Wallis Salisbury 2014, cat. 320

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2011421
2011421

Sold Ceramics - Sold Chinese wares over-decorated in the West 1700-1800 - Dutch over-decorated Amsterdams Bont - House of Orange - Page 1

 

Object 2011421

 

Teacup and saucer

 

China

 

1740-1750, over-decorated in the Netherlands 1740-1750

 

Height of teacup 38 mm (1.49 inch), diameter of rim 60 mm (2.36 inch), diameter of footring 35 mm (1.38 inch)

Height of saucer 27 mm (1.06 inch), diameter of rim 107 mm (4.21 inch), diameter of footring 61 mm (2.40 inch)

 

Teacup and saucer on footrings, straight rims. Blanc de Chine. Polychrome over-decorated in iron-red, black, gold and other enamels in the Netherlands, Amsterdams Bont, c.1740-1750 with a man in a windswept coat and black breeches standing on a ladder holding a basket and picking fruit from heavy laden branches. Round the rim a border with flower heads and foliage. The reverse is undecorated. The teacup is decorated en suite.

 

Although politically the Seven Provinces were united as a Republic, the House of Orange had many loyal supporters. Portraits and coats of arms of the princely couple may not have been the only form of pro-Orange propaganda. The very popular design on this teacup and saucer is known as 'The Cherry Picker' or 'The Apple Picker'. The pattern is in two parts: the man up the ladder gathering the fruit and the loving couple sitting enjoying the basket of fruit. Although many Dutch people today insist that the subject is simply an erotic story of stolen fruit, the size of the 'cheries' or 'apples' on the trees has led others, including W.W. Winkworth, Stephan Hartog and myself to question whether they could be oranges. (Espir 2005, p.165)   

 

Litzenbug states that this design was possibly inspired by the work of Jacopo Amigoni (1685-1752), whose engravings were widely copied onto European ceramics and Chinese export porcelain. Closely related variants are known on eighteenth-century Dutch earthenware. Similar scenes were painted by Nicolas Lancret (1690-1743), Jean Antoine Watteau (1684-1721), and François Boucher (1703-1770). (Litzenburg 2003, p.165 & p.261)

 

Groeneweg states that in the collection of the Victoria & Albert Museum in London the same the 'Cherry Picker' design - as on this teacup and saucer - is already found on a Dutch Delftware spittoon, dated on the rim "1747" and marked "MVP". (V&A inv. C.23371910).

 

Condition:

Teacup: A fleabite to the rim.

Saucer: A hairline and a shallow frit to the rim.

 

References:

Goldsmith Phillips 1956, plate 60

Beurdeley 1962, fig 27 & 28

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1966, cat. 205

Park 1973, cat. 22, 23 & 24

Jörg 1982/1, cat. 48

Hervouët 1986, cat. 4.23 & 16.25

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1989, cat. 191

Litzenburg 2003, cat. 160 & 264

 

Price: Sold.

 

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Sold Imari Designs

Japanese porcelain was made and decorated at Arita. the terms 'Imari' and 'Kakiemon' define the different styles of decoration that had developed in Japanese export porcelain by the 1680s. Imari in the name of the port in Hizen province from which the porcelain was shipped to Nagasaki for export and Imari decoration consists mainly of a combination of dark underglaze blue with a rich mixture of patterns in Japanese style dominated by red and gold. Kakiemon is the name of a family of enamellers at Arita and in this context defines a small number of patterns and motifs painted in a restricted palette that were copied from the Japanese by the Dutch enamellers, and later at Meissen, Chantilly, Chelsea and other European factories.

Auction records of the East India Company in London show that higher prices were paid for Japanese than for Chinese porcelain reflecting the prices charged by the Japanese potters,

The demand for Japanese porcelain was strong but production was restricted so here was a gap in the market that the enameller could fill most profitably by giving Chinese porcelain a Japanese look.

The simplest way of transforming Chinese porcelain into ''Japanese" was to enhance Chinese blue-and-white porcelain with red and gold to create the appearance of Imari. Tea, chocolate and coffee wares were commonly enhanced in this fashion and although it typifies 'Amsterdams Bont', sherds have been found in London making it difficult to distinguish between Dutch and English over-decoration. (Espir 2005, pp.73-74)  

2010111
2010111

Sold Ceramics - Sold Chinese wares over-decorated in the West 1700-1800 - Dutch over-decorated Amsterdams Bont - Imari Designs - Page 1

 

Object 2010111

 

Bowl

 

China

1720-1740, over-decorated in the Netherlands 1750-1770

 

Height 73 mm (2.87 inch), diameter of rim 140 mm (5.51 inch), diameter of footring 65 mm (2.56 inch)

 

Bowl on footring with steeply rounded sides and an underglaze brown-edged rim (jia mangkou). Decorated in underglaze blue with a feng-huang in flight, on the base a single flower spray. Over-decorated in iron-red, black, gold and other overglaze enamels, in the Netherlands, Amsterdams Bont c.1750-1770 with on the footring a zi-zag lines patter border, just above the footringa border with cartouches and reserves each filled with a single flower head. On the outside three panels filled with a 'bridal' decoration, the first panel is filled with a man holding flowers, the second with a woman holding flowers and the third with a couple holding hands and flowers. In between the panels a decoration of a feng-huang or a Chinese phoenix in flight. On the bottom a basket with tassels, filled with flowering plants. On the sides three flowering stems and flowering scrolls alternating with three little dancing boys in Dutch 'zotjes' holding flowers. Marked on the base with the symbol mark: 'Endless knot', in a double circle, underglaze blue.

 

The feng-huang, also called feng or (misleadingly) Chinese phoenix, is in Chinese mythology, an immortal bird whose rare appearance is said to be an omen foretelling harmony at the ascent to the throne of a new emperor. Like the qilin (a unicorn-like creature), the feng-huang is often considered to signify both male and female elements, a yin-yang harmony; its name is a combination of the words feng representing the male aspect and huang the female. (Wikipedia), (Britannica Online Encyclopaedia)

 

For an identically, shaped, sized and over-decorated bowl, please see:

Condition: Perfect.

 

References:

Davison 1994, cat. 1828

Espir 2005, pp.73-76 & cat. 2

Sargent 2012, p.183

Britannica Online Encyclopaedia

Wikipedia

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2010110
2010110

Sold Ceramics - Sold Chinese wares over-decorated in the West 1700-1800 - Dutch over-decorated Amsterdams Bont - Imari Designs - Page 1

 

Object 2010110

 

Bowl

 

China

1730-1750, over-decorated in the Netherlands, Amsterdams Bont, c.1750-1770

 

Height 73 mm (2.87 inch), diameter of rim 146 mm (5.74 inch), diameter of footring 60 mm (2.36 inch)

 

Bowl on footring, straight underglaze brown-edged rim (jia mangkou). Decorated in underglaze blue with various flower spays. On the base a flower spray in a central roundel, round the inner rim a border with leaves and flower heads on an underglaze blue ground. Over-decorated in iron-red, black and gold and overglaze green enamel, in the Netherlands, Amsterdams Bont c.1750-1770 with round the footring a zig-zag lines-pattern border and around the footring a spiral-pattern border. On the outside a little dancing boy in Dutch 'zotje' and a man dressed in European clothes holding a walking-cane alternating with groups of flowering plants near a fence. On the bottom a peony flower spray and on the sides small lotus flower heads alternating with chrysanthemum and lotus flower heads with foliage.

 

For an identically, shaped, sized and over-decorated bowl, please see:

Condition: Two very tiny fleabites to the inner rim.

 

References:

Sargent 2012, p.183

Salisbury 2014, cat. 308

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2011508
2011508

Sold Ceramics - Sold Chinese wares over-decorated in the West 1700-1800 - Dutch over-decorated Amsterdams Bont - Imari Designs - Page 1

 

Object 2011508

 

Tea caddy

 

China

 

1720-1740, over-decorated in the Netherlands 1750-1770

 

Height excluding cover 105 mm (4.10 inch), dimensions 95 mm (3.71 inch) x 55 mm (2.17 inch), weight including cover 370 grams (13.05 ounce (oz.))

 

Rectangular tea caddy with canted corners on a flat, unglazed, base. On the flat top an unglazed cylindrical mouth. The original cover is missing. Fitted with Dutch silver mounts (marked). Decorated in underglaze blue around the foot and shoulder with a border of folded leaves with reserves filled with a floret between scrolls. On the flat top two groups of taihu (garden) rock with flowering plants. Over-decorated in The Netherlands, Amsterdams Bont c.1750-1770, in iron-red, black, gold and other overglaze enamels, between the two underglaze blue borders with scattered flower heads on an iron-red ground with a crackled-ice motif in gold and a large shaped panel filled with flower spray alternating with a smaller shaped panel filed with a river scape. On the flat top the cylindrical mouth is flanked by various flower sprays.   

 

The prunus blossoms on crackled ice was a new decorating method on early Kangxi porcelain and together symbolised the end of Winter and the beginning of Spring. The Amsterdams Bont decorator used the crackled-ice motif here to create an Oriental effect, the chinoiserie. Curious detail is the slightly of centre placing of the filling opening. (Hartog 1990, p.149)

 

Condition: A few popped bubbles of glaze to the edges, a short hairline to the neck and some wear to the blue enamel.

 

Reference: 

Hartog 1990, cat. 93

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2010805
2010805

Sold Ceramics - Sold Chinese wares over-decorated in the West 1700-1800 - Dutch over-decorated Amsterdams Bont - Imari Designs - Page 1

 

Object 2010805

 

Teacup and saucer

 

China

 

1730-1740, over-decorated in the Netherlands 1750-1770

 

Height of teacup 45 mm (1.77 inch), diameter of rim 82 mm (3.23 inch), diameter of footring 32 mm (1.26 inch)

Height of saucer 24 mm (0.94 inch), diameter of rim 131 mm (5.16 inch), diameter of footring 76 mm (2.99 inch)

 

Teacup and saucer on footrings, slightly everted rims. Teacup and saucer both delicately incised with a fine petal-type pattern into the porcelain. Decorated in underglaze blue with a central diaper-pattern border with reserves filled with flower heads, round the rim another diaper-pattern border with reserves filled with flower heads. Over-decorated in the Netherlands 1750-1770, with iron-red and gold with a single butterfly in a central roundel and gilded panels and borders. The teacup is decorated en suite.

 

The simple beauty of the incised petal-type pattern which is just visible, incised in Chinese anhua 'secret' decoration has been ignored and painted over.

In the late 19th century European decorated oriental porcelain was called 'clobbered', a word that came into the English language in the mid-19th century meaning as a noun, 'a black paste used by clobbers to fill up and conceal cracks in leather', and as a verb, 'to patch up, to cobble'. Later it was applied to old clothes meaning 'to renovate' and by the 19th century it was it was applied to porcelain. In 1900, F.Litchfield stated, 'There is a description of Chinese known as clobbered .... overpainted with ....ornament ..... sold for decorated oriental China.' It was a derogatory term meaning that the European decorator had plastered his style of decoration all over the pot with total disregard for the original which was the case in much Chinese blue-and-white over-decorated in the early 19th century and which are to blame for the poor reputation of these wares ever since. 

The sophistication of this style of Chinese decoration on ordinary everyday wares was apparently not appreciated in Europe at the time and many of the blue and white plates, bowls and teacups and saucers that were over-decorated have carved or incised anhua decoration. As it cannot be seen to clash with the European decoration I would not call it clobbered. (Espir 2005, pp. 74-75) 

 

The incised pattern is barely discernible to the naked eye unless the ware is held up to the light. The incised recesses have been filled with a transparent glaze to create a flat surface. The Chinese call this technique anhua (hidden decoration). (Emden 2015/1, p.132, cat. 122)

 

For an identically over-decorated teacup and saucer, please see:

 For originally Chinese over-decorated objects, please see:

Condition:

Teacup: A shallow glaze chip and frit to the rim.

Saucer: Perfect.

 

References:

Ottema 1943, cat. 225

Mudge 2000, cat. 184

Espir 2005, pp. 74-75

Emden 2015/1, cat. 122

Emden 2015/2, cat. 122

 

Price: Sold.

 

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More pictures of object 2010806, another identically shaped, sized and over-decorated, sold saucer >>

 

Sold Kakiemon Designs

The finest Kakiemon porcelains were enamelled on very white clay in a palette of translucent blue, yellow. blue-green, red and black enamels and gold. The composition, the range of motifs and the delicacy of the painting in a restricted palette all contribute to a distinctive style which is instantly recognisable. Many of the subjects of the design, especially the birds and the flowers, originated in China but had subsequently been absorbed into Japanese art. (Espir 2005, p.78)

 

While underglaze blue was perfectly suited to Imari over-decoration it added nothing to Kakiemon only constraining it within its borders, but it seems that an attempt was made by the Dutch decorators to widen the market for Kakiemon by modifying the style to fit the more common blue-and-white porcelain. As only a few of the larger items such as teapots, stands, slopbowls and milk jugs remain, and teabowls and saucers are very rare, one can only conclude that the attempt was unsuccessful. (Espir 2005, p.91) 

2012188
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Sold Ceramics - Sold Chinese wares over-decorated in the West 1700-1800 - Dutch over-decorated Amsterdams Bont - Kakiemon Designs - Page 1

 

Object 2012188

 

Dish

 

China

 

1730-1750, over-decorated in the Netherlands, Amsterdams Bont, c.1740

 

Height 30 mm (0.91 inch), diameter of rim 165 mm (6.50 inch), diameter of footring 84 mm (3.31 inch), weight 183 grams (6.46 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on footring, slightly everted rim. Undecorated. Over-decorated, in a Kakiemon-style, in iron-red, black, green and other overglaze enamels, in the Netherlands, Amsterdams Bont, c.1740 with an underglaze brown-edged rim, in the centre a flowering branch in between two brushwood fences and two birds in flight. On the sides two wide spread groups of flowering prunus, pine and bamboo plants issuing from a rocky mound. The reverse is undecorated. Marked on the base with, pseudo-Chinese characters painted in overglaze iron-red.

 

Decorated with a stylised rendering of the 'Three Friends' pattern round the border. This in combined with a central pattern in which Kakiemon features are combined in an un-Japanese way, filling the space but without the Japanese sense of space being part of the composition. While the banded hedge, the birds and bamboo leaves are in classic Kakiemon style, the strange bold flowers have no readily traceable Japanese counterpart and seem rather to be a European invention which combines elements of a pomegranate fruit and a hibiscus flower. This pattern with variations according to the size of the object, is known on several plates, dishes and a bowl in the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford and the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. The dishes in the Ashmolean Museum have a decorator's mark of pseudo Chinese characters in red enamel on the base indicating that they were decorated in the same workshop. (Espir 2005, pp.87-88)

 

The hedge of rice straw, known as a 'banded hedge' because of the ties binding it together, is one of the trademarks of Kakiemon design as are flying and perching birds, tigers and the bamboo leaves on the ground, Tigers both fierce and playful, feature prominently in kakiemon designs. Painted in yellow, red and blue with black-stripes, they crouch and snarl and prepare to leap after prey such as the bird perched on the bamboo tree. (Espir 2005, p.82) 

 

The four pseudo-Chinese characters on the base are, most likely, made up by the Dutch Amsterdams Bont over-decorator. Important was to create an Oriental effect, the 'chinoiserie'.

 

For an identically, over-decorated in Kakiemon style, dish, please see:

Condition: A shallow glaze frit to the reverse rim.

 

Reference:

Espir 2005, p.82, pp.87-88 & cat.19

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2011619
2011619

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Object 2011619

 

Spoon or leak tray

 

China

 

1730-1750, over-decorated in the Netherlands, Amsterdams Bont, c.1730

 

Height 22 mm (0.86 inch), dimensions 152 mm (5.98 inch) x 87 mm (3.42 inch), weight 132 grams (4.66 ounce (oz.))

 

Exhibited: The Asian Galleries Reinmagined - Color Across Asia held from 21 December 2016 to 13 May 2018 at the Ackland Art Museum, The University of North Carolina at Chaphil Hill, The United States of America, Object Guide no. 76.

 

Leaf shaped spoon or leak tray with lobed sides and an underglaze brown-edged (jia mangkou) rim, on a smooth, unglazed base. Decorated in underglaze blue with a stylised border round the bottom and on the lobbed sides. On the outside flower sprays. Over-decorated in iron-red, black, gold and other overglaze enamels, in the Netherlands, Amsterdams Bont, c.1730. Decorated with floral sprays and two diaper pattern borders with a single reserve filled with a flower head between scrolls. Over-decorated in a Kakiemon-style with bamboo, an enlarged branch of a flowering peony tree, a shishi and a bird perched on the branch of a flowering prunus tree growing from a brushwood fence. On the exterior flower sprays with birds in flight. On the base an old rectangular paper label.

 

While underglaze blue was perfectly suited to Imari over-decoration it added nothing to Kakiemon only constraining it within its borders, but it seems that an attempt was made by the Dutch decorators to widen the market for Kakiemon by modifying the style to fit the more common blue-and-white porcelain. As only a few of the larger items such as teapots, stands, slopbowls and milk jugs remain, and teabowls and saucers are very rare, one can only conclude that the attempt was unsuccessful. (Espir 2005, p.91) 

 

The hedge of rice straw, known as a 'banded hedge' because of the ties binding it together, is one of the trademarks of Kakiemon design as are flying and perching birds, tigers and the bamboo leaves on the ground, Tigers both fierce and playful, feature prominently in kakiemon designs. Painted in yellow, red and blue with black-stripes, they crouch and snarl and prepare to leap after prey such as the bird perched on the bamboo tree. (Espir 2005, p.82) 

 

This brushwood fence, made up of bundles of twigs tied together is frequently combined with a bamboo trellis, an enlarged branch of a flowering peony tree and a shishi. It is a motif that occurs frequently on Kakiemon, and one which evidently appealed greatly to the European consumer, given the fact that it is often seen on European imitations of Kakiemon. (Fitski 2011, p.148)

 

A spoon or leak tray was used to protect the surface of luxurious lacquer or painted tea tables, against the influence of a hot teapot or drops running from its spout. If, in certain circles, a special tea table was not at hand it served to protect the furniture or its valuable table-cloth from tea spots. (Volker 1959

 

For an identically shaped, sized and over-decorated in Kakiemon style spoon or leak tray, please see:

Condition: Some shallow glaze rough spots to the rim and edges.

 

References:

Volker 1959

Espir 2005, p.82

Fitski 2011, p.148

Sargent 2012, p.183

Salisbury 2014, cat. 356

 

Price: Sold.

 

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Sold Famille Verte Designs

Very few examples copying famille verte porcelains are known suggesting that there was a plentiful supply of Chinese originals and that there was therefore no gap in the market for the European decorators to fill. As Dutch and English decorators copied so few famille verte pieces it is tempting to allocate all the European decorated pieces which have a predominantly green palette to the famille verte style even though they may have resemble the Chinese originals. (Espir 2005, pp.97-102

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Sold Ceramics - Sold Chinese wares over-decorated in the West 1700-1800 - Dutch over-decorated Amsterdams Bont - Famille Verte Designs - Page 1

 

Object 2011170

 

Tea caddy China

 

1730-1750, over-decorated in the Netherlands, Amsterdams Bont, c.1750-1770

 

Height with cover 132 mm (5.20 inch), height without cover 109 mm (4.29 inch), dimensions  66 mm (2.60 inch) x 66 mm (2.60 inch)

 

Tea caddy of square form with canted corners. Four flat feet at the corners. A flat shoulder and a short upright neck. Fitted with marked Dutch silver mounts. Decorated in underglaze blue, around the foot and the shoulder a diaper pattern border with reserves filled with flower heads. On the flat shoulder, in each corner, a leafy flower head. Over-decorated in iron-red, black, gold and overglaze green enamel, in the Netherlands, Amsterdams Bont c.1740-1750. On the foot and shoulder a diaper pattern border with reserves filled with flower heads. All sides incised with a floral decoration and over-decorated with a basket filled with flowering plants, each canted corner with a flowering tree. On the flat shoulder in each corner flowering plants, the edge is decorated with a cracked-ice motif. Marked on the base with, most pseudo-Chinese characters painted in overglaze iron-red. The silver marks explained: the Lion Rampant is the silver guarantee mark (.875), the sword mark was used (1814-1905) as the standard mark on articles too small for the full hallmarking.

 

The four pseudo-Chinese characters on the base are, most likely, made up by the Dutch Amsterdams Bont over-decorator. Important was to create an Oriental effect, the 'chinoiserie'. What makes this object interesting is that the Amsterdams Bont over-decoration is painted right over a chip to the neck and a glaze rough spot to the edge. These two damages were, most likely, caused after the first firing of the tea-caddy and before the second Amsterdams Bont over decoration firing, the crackled-ice pattern over the edge does not appear to be consistent.

 

For a similarly in Kakiemon style over-decorated tea caddy, please see:

Condition: A chip to the shoulder and some rough spots the edges.

 

References:

Espir 2005, pp.97-102

Salisbury 2014, cat. 380

 

Price: Sold.

 

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Sold Chinoiserie / Japonaiserie Designs

European decorators incorporated Chinese and Japanese motifs into chinoiserie scenes with most attractive results. The idea was to create an effect that looked oriental to European eyes. What was created was not seldom superb examples of the quality that could be achieved by the Dutch decorators in copying Chinese and Japanese subjects. (Espir 2005, pp.95-96)

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Object 2010116

 

Tea caddy

 

China

 

1720-1740, over-decorated in the Netherlands 1750-1770

 

Height 113 mm (4.48 inch), dimensions 90 mm (3.54 inch) x 55 mm (2.17 inch)

 

Tea caddy of rectangular form with canted corners, a flat shoulder with a short upright neck and cover. The flat base is unglazed. Decorated in underglaze blue around the foot, the shoulder and on the shoulder with a stylised border of folded leaves with reserves filled with a floret between scrolls. around the cover a silk worm pattern border and on top a chrysanthemum flower head. Over-decorated in the Netherlands, Amsterdams Bont c.1750-1770, in iron-red and gold with a chinoiserie of a sitting figure drinking tea and reading a book in a tent near a flowering plant and a running dog. On the sides of the cover half flower heads with leafy branches. 

 

Condition: A large chip to the cover, two firing flaws to the neck and some glaze frits to the edges of the

tea caddy and cover.

 

Price: Sold.

 

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Object 2011204

 

Saucer

 

China

 

1710-1720, over-decorated in the Netherlands, Amsterdams Bont,c.1720-1740

 

Height 23 mm (0.91 inch), diameter of rim 135 mm (5.32 inch), diameter of footring 70 mm (2.76 inch), weight 251 grams (8.53 ounce (oz.))

 

Saucer on footring, slightly everted rim. Decorated in underglaze blue with a flower in a central roundel surrounded by a diaper-pattern border, round the rim also a diaper pattern border.Over-decorated in iron-red, black, gold and other overglaze enamels, in the Netherlands, Amsterdams Bont, c.1750-1770 on the sides with in a chinoiserie style with Japanese influences. Marked on the base with the symbol mark: "Mandarin mark of honour", in a double circle, underglaze blue.

 

The images were probably taken from handbooks with examples for imitation lacquer. Important was to create an Oriental effect, the chinoiserie.

 

For the development of arts and crafts in Europe, porcelain and lacquer, were important goods. Europeans were only interested in specific Chinese and Japanese arts and crafts, the art of Chinese painting was said to be primitive and architecture to be unpredictable. This caused that in Europe only a limited view of Chinese and Japanese arts and crafts existed. There was no distinction made between Chinese and Japanese art. Out of the Chinese or Japanese arts and crafts, a choice was made whatever suited the European interior best for its use without further investigation into the typical Chinese or Japanese artistic aspects. This all caused that in Europe an Image of China existed that did not match with the reality. Especially for the arts this created a fantasy image which led to the development of Chinese orientated European arts and crafts that was named chinoiserie. (Delft 1976, pp.17-21)

 

Condition: A frit and various fleabites to the rim.

 

Reference:

Delft 1976, pp.17-21

 

Price: Sold.

 

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Sold Other Designs

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Object 2012115

 

Teapot

 

China

 

1730-1750, over-decorated in the Netherlands, Amsterdams Bont, c.1750-1770

 

Height with cover 115 mm (4.52 inch), height without cover 84 mm (3.30 inch), diameter handle to spout 165 mm (6.50 inch), diameter of mouthrim 52 mm (2.05 inch), diameter of footring 50 mm (1.97 inch), weight with cover 333 grams (11.74 ounce (oz.)), weight cover 63 grams (2.22 ounce (oz.))

 

Globular teapot on footring. The original handle is missing and replaced by a wicker handle. A straight spout and a domed and pierced cover with knob. Decorated in underglaze blue with, on both sides, wide flower sprays, round the mouthrim a zig-zag-lines pattern border with reserves filled with florets between scrolls. On the spout a single flower spray. The cover is decorated en suite. Over-decorated, respecting and following the original underglaze blue decoration, in iron-red, gold and overglaze green and black enamel, in the Netherlands, Amsterdams Bont c.1750-1770 with two panels, reserved on an iron-red and gold diaper-pattern ground, filled with flower sprays and on both sides flanked by a bird perched on a branch. On the cover two panels, reserved on an iron-red and gold diaper-pattern ground filled with flower sprays.

 

New York City based interior designer, set decorator and author Andrew Baseman's blog, Past Imperfect: The Art of Inventive Repair, is a fascinating accounting of ceramic and glass repairs from the time in history when your China wasn't a disposable item but rather a cherished heirloom to be creatively repaired for continued use. This Chinese teapot with its 'inventive repair' is an exellent example of such an object.

 

Condition: The original handle is missing and replaced by a wicker handle, chips to the tip of the spout and the rim of the cover. Missing pieces of glaze and a chip to the knob.

 

References:

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1966, cat. 342 & 343

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, cat. 390

Mudge 2000, cat. 176

http://andrewbaseman.com/blog/

 

Price: Sold.

 

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Object 2011151

 

Saucer

 

China

 

1740-1745, over-decorated in the Netherlands, Amsterdams Bont, c.1740-1745

 

Height 17 mm (0.67 inch), diameter of rim 115 mm (4.53 inch), diameter of footring 72 mm (2.83 inch)

 

Saucer on footring, slightly everted rim. Blanc de Chine. Polychrome over-decorated in iron-red, black, gold and other overglaze enamels, in the Netherlands, Amsterdams Bont, c.1750-1770 with 'The Crucifixion' the crucified Christ flanked by St. John and the Virgin Mary before a distant townscape with a church and trees. Round the rim a partial spearhead border. The reverse is undecorated.

 

Biblical scenes from the Old and New Testaments painted on Chinese porcelain in the Netherlands appear to date mostly from the 1740s onwards and were painted in either a naïve style or copy the work of old masters. Events in the life of Christ, particularly the crucifixion, were the most numerous. Many surviving pieces are teacups and saucers. Jesus hangs on the cross, the wounds in his hands, feet and side spurting blood. The Virgin Mary, his mother, on the right and his disciple John stand grieving at the foot of the cross which is firmly pegged into the ground. In the background is the church tower and houses of a small town. Glimpsed inside the cup are instruments of the passion; the hammer and nails, the spear, rope, ladder, rod and sponge and the scourge with the crown of thorns in the centre. The same crucifixion scene, with more detail such as the elaborate halos and townscape, is also found on delftware and on Weesp porcelain teawares. (Espir 2005, pp.194-195)

 

Painted on porcelain blanks shipped to the Netherlands from China, the perspective, colouring and drawing style on this saucer are typical of Dutch-decorated pieces. The plainly drawn figures of the Virgin Mary and St. John, the undulating landscape and the cluster of church steeples in the far background recall various sixteenth-century Flemish paintings of the Crucifixion. (Litzenburg 2003, p. 201)

 

For identically over-decorated teacups and saucers, please see:

For an identically over-decorated teacup, please see:

For similarly over-decorated saucers see:

Condition: A tiny hairline and restored chip to the rim, a X-shaped glaze hairline to the base (only visible on the base).

 

References:

Vries 1923, cat. 12

Ottema 1943, cat. 245

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1974, cat. 238

Jörg 1989/2, p.160

Mudge 2000, cat 122

London 2002, lots 1311 & 1312

Litzenburg 2003, cat. 190

Espir 2005,  pp.194-195 & cat. 50

Salisbury 2014, cat. 343

 

Price: Sold.

 

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