Pater Gratia Oriental Art

Recent Acquisitions

On this page you'll find my latest acquisitions, It may, however, take some time for all objects to load.

 

This way you can quickly browse through my recently acquired objects without having to browse through all the various categories.

 

After four weeks each object in 'Recent Acquisitions' will be moved to their specific category.

 

Latest update; November 18, 2017.

2012114
2012114

Red & Gold / Rouge-de-Fer 1690-1730

 

Object 2012114

 

Saucer

China

1720-1740

 

Height 17 mm (0.67 inch), diameter of rim 107 mm (4.21 inch), diameter of footring 66 mm (2.60 inch), weight 42 grams (1.48 ounce (oz.))

 

Saucer on footring, slightly everted rim. Decorated in 'Red & Gold' / 'Rouge-de-fer' with iron-red, silver (oxidised) and gold with two quails near a shore, taihu (garden) rock and flowering peont and prunus plants. The reverse is undecorated.

 

The quail, or a pair of quails, fairly often used as a motif on fine porcelain, is a symbol of courage because of its fighting qualities. (Jörg & Van Campen 1997, p.213)

 

For other objects, polychrome decorated with two quails, please see:

 Condition: A short hairline to the rim.

 

Reference:

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, cat. 237

  

Price: Sold.

 

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2012112
2012112

Japanese Imari 1690-1800

 

Object 2012112

 

Bowl

 

Japan

 

1700-1730

 

Height 74 mm (2.91 inch), diameter of rim 150 mm (5.91 inch), diameter of footring 59 mm (2.32 inch), weight 355 grams (12.52 ounce (oz.))

  

Bowl on footring, spreading straight rim. Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, iron-red and gold with flowering plants and a white hare running from foaming waves. Round the foot a band of floral sprays. On the bottom a single flower spray in a double concertric band.

 

Apparently, the motif of the running hare was popular on Japanese porcelain. It is generally depicted combined with waves or the moon in some form or amidst waving pampas grass.

 

This particular hare pattern is known on bowls, teacups and saucers and a rare milk jug, indicating that tea sets with matching parts were made for export.

 

The hare (usagi) is associated with the moon and old age. Legends says that the female conceives by running on the waves –  represented by the curved underglaze blue lines -  on the 18th day of the 8th month when the sky is clear, and the moon is reflected in the water. The female can also conceive by licking the fur of the male during the same period or simply by gazing at the moon. 

 

Another version of the legend tells of a white hare on the island of Oki who wanted to go to the mainland. As he could not swim, he cunningly asked a number of crocodiles to line up in the water, under the pretence of counting them, to see if there were more crocodiles in the sea than hares on Oki. He had almost reached the shore by jumping across their backs, when the last crocodile saw through his deception and snapped off all his fur before the hare leapt ashore. (Arts 1983, pp.113-114, p.143, plate 89, Piggott 1997, pp.109-110, Fitski 2002, p.6, Jörg 2003/1, pp.117-118, Fitski 2011, p158

 

Yet another account says that the crocodiles ran after him and snapped his white fur to take revenge because he had laughed at them for their stupidity. After the hare repented and promised never to use deceit again, the fairy Okuni-nushi-no-Mikoto helped him regrow his fur.

 

For identically shaped and decorated bowls, please see:

For other identically decorated objects, please see:

For other identically decorated objets, still available for sale, please see:

Condition: A tiny firing (glaze) flaw to the rim.

 

References:

Arts 1983, pp.113-114 & p.143, plate 89

Piggott 1997, pp.109-110

Fitski 2002, p 6

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 126, 247 & 247a

Fitski 2011, p.158

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2011466
2011466

Japanese Blue and White wares 17th Century - Other wares

 

Object 2011466

 

Ewer

 

Japan

 

1660-1680

 

Height 206 mm (8.11 inch), diameter 97 mm (3.82 inch), diameter of mouthrim 39 mm (1.54 inch), diameter of footring 61 mm (2.40 inch), weight 513 grams (18.10 ounce (oz.))

 

Ewer of ovoid body on a spreading takefushi or 'bamboo-noded' foot. Narrow waisted neck and large cup-shaped mouth with pinched spout. Curved pierced handle. Decorated in underglaze blue in Chinese Transitional style with a sketchy mountainous landscape with swirling clouds, banana trees and other vegetation. Round the foot, shoulder, neck and on the handle bands with a classic scroll, zig-zag and foliate patterns. 

 

The Chinese Transitional style was virtually unknown in Japan until it was introduced by the Dutch. Japanese potters were not asked to imitate original Chinese porcelains by the Dutch; instead they were given wooden models which had probably been painted by Delft pottery decorators (though this is undocumented) or earthenware (presumably Delft). It is hardly surprising therefore, that the resultant Japanese essays in Transitional style are far from the original both in design and execution. Many shapes are Chinese, and some are Near Eastern, but others reflect Delft wares or at least Delft variations on a Chinese theme. Most Japanese Transitional style wares are in closed shapes, mugs, jugs, jars and ewers; most kraak style pieces are in open shapes, plates and bowls. The piercing on the handles of this and similar shapes is original, and was intended for the silver or other metal mount that would customarily have been added in Europe. (Impey 2002, pp.42-49 & p.49)

 

The shape of this ewer derived from a German stoneware model. For similarly shaped ewers decorated with Dutch armorials, please see:

The shape of the bulging foot, which spreads and then turns sharply inward, is seen on many ewers of this period as well as on later jars, vases and other pieces. It is a distinctively Japanese feature, called takefushi, 'bamboo-noded' foot. (Jörg 2003/1, p.74) 

 

The flower motif on the cup-shaped mouth replaces similarly located 'tulip' designs on Chinese Transitional export porcelain. (Jörg 2003/1, p.160

 

For similarly shaped ewers, please see:

Condition: A frit to the handle.

 

References: 

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1971, cat. 88 & cat. 89

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1980, cat. 399 & cat. 400a

London 1997, cat. 16

Impey 2002, pp.42-49 & p.49

Jörg 2003/1, p.74 & cat. 177 & cat. 292

 

Price: € 699 - $ 814 - £ 621

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2012109
2012109

Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - 'Gold' Imari

 

Object 2012109

 

Dish

 

Japan

 

1700-1720

  

Height 34 mm (1.33 inch), diameter of rim 213 mm (8.35 inch), diameter of footring 107 mm (4.21 inch), weight 425 grams (14.99 once (oz.)),

 

Dish on footring, everted lobed rim. On the base three spur-marks in a V-pattern. 'Gold' Imari, decorated in gold, iron-red and a light-pinkish gold wash. In the centre a pair of quails near a shore under a millet plant. On the sides peony flower heads with foliage alternating with a butterfly in flight. On the rim flower heads alternating with leaves. The reverse is undecorated.

 

A group that seems to have been especially favoured in The Netherlands, traditionally called 'Gold Imari', dates to the early 18th century. These wares are painted in gold only, in gold and iron-red, or in gold and red with a few touches of green, aubergine and black. 'Gold Imari' is relatively well represented in collections in the northern parts of The Netherlands but which occurs less often in old English and German collections

 

From about 1700 the gold often has a pink-violet hue ('pink lustre'), which is clearly visible on the white porcelain background when the gold is very thin or has been rubbed off. It seems that the Japanese enamellers used a different process to the Chinese, because Chinese pieces do not have this pink violet hue. (Jörg 2003/1, pp.92-93)

 

The quail, closely allied to the partridge, is an emblem of courage both in China and Japan, as it is highly esteemed as a fighting bird. In North China people made these birds fight under a basket, where millet first had been strewn to make them jealous. Moreover, quails are believed to change into pheasants eventually. On Japanese porcelain they are frequently depicted amidst autumn grasses under millet. This quail and millet design, symbolizing the autumn is especially common on Kakiemon, but is also found on ko Kutani, Imari and blue-and-white wares. It has been suggested that that particular form is copied from the work of the painter Tosa Mitsuoki (1607-1691), but it probably originated from Chinese paintings of the Sung period. This motif has been copied on European porcelain, especially at Bow and Chelsea, where it is used as a decoration on the so-called 'partridge plates', and also on Meissen porcelain. (Arts 1983, pp.134-135

 

Condition: Two hairlines to the rim.

 

References:

Arts 1983, pp.134-135

Jörg 2003/1, pp.92-93

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2012107
2012107
Chinese Imari 1700-1800

 

Object 2012107

 

Tea caddy

 

China

 

1710-1730

 

Height without cover 92 mm (3.62 inch), dimensions 76 mm (2.99 inch) x 59 mm (2.32 inch), weight with cover 250 grams (8.82 ounce (oz.)), weight cover 20 grams (0.71 ounce (oz.)) 

 

Tea caddy of moulded fan-shaped form, on the flat shoulder an unglazed cylindrical mouth. The edge in underglaze light brown (jia mangkou). The base is unglazed. The original cover is missing and replaced with an unmarked silver cover. Chinese Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, overglaze iron-red and gold in low relief with four moulded panels, one with a garden wall, a porch and a window, in low relief, flowering plants and a pine-tree, two with a pavilion on a shore in a river scape in low relief and one with a bridge between two pieces of land and large rockwork with flowering plants in low relief. On the flat shoulder the unglazed cylindrical mouth is flanked by flowering plants. On the side of the cover two flowering branches and on top a pavilion near a shore with mountains in the background.

 

Only grown in China and Japan during the 17th Century, tea became known in the Netherlands early because the Dutch East India Company (VOC) shipped small quantities home. Its use as a beverage was established slowly, and was probably started by retired VOC employees who had become accustomed to drinking tea in the East. At a tea party, the expensive beverage was served in small teapots, one for each guest. The tea was poured into small cups, while the teapot was refilled with hot water from a metal or sometimes ceramic kettle. (Jörg 2011/2, p.131)

 

Judging from its shape, this tea caddy was once part of a set of seven, one centre piece surrounded by six others all placed on a matching tray. The seven individual tea caddies were filled with various tea blends allowing each tea drinker to choose the type he or she preferred. Such a complete set must have been regarded as luxury tea wares and was certainly placed prominently on a tea serving table. 

 

For an identically shaped, sized and decorated, sold, tea caddy, please see:

Condition: Some glaze rough spots to the edges and a frit to the underglaze light brown edge.

 

Reference:

Jörg 2011/2, p.131

 

Price: € 299 - $ 353 - £ 266

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2012108
2012108

Transitional wares 1620-1683

 

Object 2012108

 

Mustard pot

 

China

 

c.1635-1645

 

Height 106 mm (4.17 inch), diameter mouthrim 50 mm (1.97 inch), diameter of footring 55 mm (2.17 inch), weight 243 grams (8.57 ounce (oz.)).

 

Mustard pot of hexagonal ribbed and ovoid form with a pedestal foot and a sunked in base. Curved C-shaped handle. Wide mouth with glazed rim for cover, now missing. Decorated in underglaze blue with single flower sprays, bamboo and flowering, prunus, irises, lotus and aster plants. Around the foot a descending lotus leaves pattern border, on the handle cloud motifs.

 

In 1644, the Ming dynasty was replaced by the Qing dynasty, which was preceded by a transitional period. This gave rise to the name 'transitional porcelain'. A typical feature of this transitional porcelain is that the decoration extends over the entire object. Elegant flower sprays applied as scattered decorative elements that do not seem to form a composite whole typify mid-17th century transitional porcelain. (Jörg 2002/2, p.70)

 

Mustard pots were ordered by the Dutch East India Company, (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie, VOC), as early as 1608. From 1625 onward, the VOC had a trading post on Formosa (present-day Taiwan). Chinese junk seafarers soon made regular trips to Formosa with a large assortment of Chinese goods. The VOC could now order products that were in demand in the Netherlands, such as salts, jugs with spouts, terrines and suchlike, with a Dutch form. This mustard pot was also part of this product line. Volker reports that in 1639 the VOC ordered 200 mustard pots of which half are to be 'ribbed as sample' and illustrates one of this form. A number of such mustard pots of exactly this design were in the cargo of a Chinese junk salvaged in 1983 by Captain Michael Hatcher and sold in Amsterdam in 1984, which also contained (unrelated) pieces with the cyclical date for 1643. Throughout the 17th century the VOC continued to order mustard pots in large quantities of up to a thousand at a time. (Howard 1994, p.129)

 

Just like salt, mustard was once an important taste-inducing additive on the dinner table, though it had less status because it was locally made. Still the luxurious mustard pots made of Chinese or Japanese 17th century porcelain were quite large. Mustard used to have to be stirred before use, which is why mustard pots often had a little opening in their lids for a small stirring stick. Sometimes such a pot was fitted with a new nice silver lid, which lacked an opening. A tiny piece of pottery was then broken out of the rim, in order to allow the stirring stick or spoon to fit in.

 

For identically and similarly shaped mustard pot, please see:

Condition: A firing flaw to the inner footring, some chipped of glaze flakes to the handle and some glaze rough spots to the mouthrim caused by the cover, now missing.

 

References:

Volker 1954, reprint 1971, Pl. XII, cat. 20

Amsterdam 1984/1, lot 104-105

Howard 1994, cat. 132

Jörg 2002/2, p.70

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 184

Suchomel 2015, p.125

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2011518
2011518

Blue and White wares since 1722

 

Object 2011518

 

Dish

 

China

 

1740-1760

 

Height 42 mm (1.65 inch), diameter of rim 248 mm (9.76 inch), diameter of footring 151 mm (5.94 inch), weight 513 grams (18.10 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on footring, straight underglaze brown-edged rim (jia mangkou). Decorated in underglaze blue with a flower basket encircled by a foliate and floral scroll border. On the sides reserves filled with flowering lotus plants flanked by reserves filled with a diaper pattern and foliate and floral scrolls. The reverse is u

undecorated.

 

The basket filled with all kinds of flowers symbolises riches and abundance and therefore was a highly popular motif, appearing on many Jingdezhen underglaze-blue and polychrome porcelains. In the Netherlands the flower basket design was apparently regarded as very Chinese and exotic, while at the same time being recognisable and fitting in with Western imagery. The motif was often used on Delftware and in particular on Amsterdams Bont, the Dutch name for underglaze or plain white Chinese porcelain, over-decorated in Delft and elsewhere in enamales. (Jörg & Van Campen 1997, p.96), (Jörg 2011/2, p.60)  

 

Condition: A firing flaw to the inner footring and a fleabite to the rim.

 

References:

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, p.96

Jörg 2011/2, p.60

Sargent 2012, p.183

 

Price: € 299 - $ 348 - £ 267

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2010878
2010878

Chinese Imari 1700-1800

 

Object 2010878

 

Dish

China

1730-1740

 

Height 29 mm (1.14 inch), diameter of rim 210 mm (8.27 inch), diameter of footring 105 mm (4.1 inch), weight 317 grams (11.18 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on footring, flat rim. Chinese Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, overglaze iron-red and gold with flowering plants in shaped panels on an underglaze blue ground with foliate and floral scrolls in gold. On the rim four groups with chrysanthemum flower heads. The reverse is undecorated.

 

Chinese Imari was first introduced in the early years of the 18th century as an imitation of Japanese 'Imari'. It was based on a simpler form and was essentially an export type. The Chinese did not imitate the Japanese Imari models but copied the designs like kiku (chrysanthemum), roundels and half-roundels, fan-shaped panels, partly unrolled bamboo blinds and rather pronounced foliate and floral scrolls. The Japanese Imari colour combination was also copied, the Chinese Imari colour palette consisted of iron-red enamel and gold in combination with underglaze blue. Sometimes other colours, and even certain enamels of the famille verte such as green and black, were sparingly introduced and used in a subtle way. Chinese Imari remained popular into the 1720 after which it became overshadowed by opaque enamels. (Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. 1, p.137, Jörg & Van Campen 1997, p.199, Sargent 2012, pp.183-188)

  

On this Chinese Imari dish the shaped panels filled with flowering plants and the pronounced foliate and floral scrolls with chrysanthemum flower heads are clearly Japanese design elements copied by the Chinese who in this way tried to appeal to their newly re-established European market.

 

Condition: A shallow glaze rough spot to the rim and some shallow rough spots to the footring.

 

References:

Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. 1, p.137

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, p.199

Sargent 2012, pp.183-188 

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2011396
2011396

Chinese wares over-decorated in the West 1700-1800 - English over-decorated

 

Object 2011396

 

Bowl

 

China

 

1720-1740, over-decorated in England 1750-1770

 

Height 61 mm (2.40 inch), diameter of rim 105 mm (4.13 inch), diameter of footring 38 mm (1.50 inch), weight 143 grams (5.04 ounce (oz.))

 

Bowl on footring with steeply rounded sides and a straight underglaze brown-edged rim (jia mangkou). Decorated in underglaze blue with flowering chrysanthemum plants alternating with flowering peony plants, on the bottom a single flowering spray. Over-decorated in England c.1750-1770, with blue enamel, iron-red and gold with flower heads and leafy sprays and stylised reserves filled half flower heads and leafy sprays. Round the footing a marubatsu pattern (modern Japanese for 'naughts and crosses' or 'Os and Xs'). Inside around the rim a pointed upturned lotus leaves in gold on a blue enamel ground with stylised reserves filled half flower heads and leafy sprays. On the bottom a river scene with pagodas, trees, flags and mountains.

 

For similarly, English over-decorated objects please see:

Condition: Two tiny fleabites and a hairline to the rim.

 

References:

Espir 2005, cat. 16

Sargent 2012, p.183

Salisbury 2014, cat. 405 & 406

 

Price: € 199 - $ 238 - £ 175

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2010C306
2010C306

Chinese Imari 1700-1800

 

Object 2010C306

  

Dish 

  

China 

  

c.1720-30 

  

Height  29 mm (1.14 inch), diameter of rim 234 mm (9.21 inch), diameter of footring 121 mm (4.76 inch), weight 317 grams (11.18 ounce (oz.)) 

  

Dish on footring, flat underglaze brown-edged rim (jia mangkou).  Chinese Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, iron-red, black and gold with two deer, one white the other brown with spots, near a flowering tree with a peony plant and a fence with taihu (garden) rocks and flowering plants. On the sides and rim a broad underglaze blue band with trelliswork and flowers in gold, on four places debouching into three large flowering bushes, alternating with four clusters with antiquities. On the reverse two leafy sprays. 

  

Interestingly, the decoration of this dish is almost identical to the plates with the well-known ‘Governor Duff and his Wife’ design. Here the couple and accompanying dog have been replaced with the two deer. This version with the two deer seems to be unrecorded in literature so far. 

 

D.S. Howard, Choice of the Private Trader, London 1994, p. 62, plate 37.

 

Imari Dish with a European gentleman and woman and their dog (‘Governor Duff and his wife’), 31,8 cm, taken from: D.S. Howard, Choice of the Private Trader, London 1994, p. 62, plate 37.  

  

Since Williamson (1927) this couple was named as such, referring to the Dutch Governor-General Diederik Durven (governor-general 1729-1931) and his wife Anna Catharina de Roo. Speculation has also led to the figures being misidentified as King Louis XIV of France and la marquise de Montespan or Madame de Maintenon.  

As Howard and Ayers rightly point out, there is no proof of this identification and it is much more likely that the design was based on a print or drawing, depicting a ‘happy Frisian couple’ of Dutch tradition in a general way. They also state that both D.F. Lunsingh Scheurleer and M. Beurdeley are also in agreement that the subject is Dutch rather than French (Jörg 1989/2, p.76; Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. I, pp. 145-146 & plate 127)

 

Sargent suggests a depiction of a “Sailor’s Farewell”, a theme which was used extensively on Western art of all media, and consequently it was fairly commonly depicted on export decorative arts including porcelain, reverse paintings on glass and lacquer. (Sargent 2012, pp.193-195

 

As it turns out, Howard & Ayers were right on the mark with their suggestion of a ‘happy Frisian couple’. In his Emden catalogue (2015), after he had made a closer study of the couple’s attire, Suebsman points out that both the man and woman are wearing clothing of the sort worn up to the mid-19th century at weddings in the Frisian community of Hindeloopen. Now but a small village, in the Dutch Golden Age Hindeloopen was a flourishing port town in which a considerable amount of trade was conducted.  

 

Bridal couple in Hindeloopen costume, taken from Th. Melkenboer, De Nederlandse Nationale Klederdrachten, Amsterdam 2017, plate 63.

 

Bridal couple in Hindeloopen costume, taken from Th. Melkenboer, De Nederlandse Nationale Klederdrachten, Amsterdam 2017, plate 63. 

 

The bridegroom has a tricorn (driesteek) on his head and is wearing a long coat with several knots, breeches and low shoes, whilst the bride sports a white net veil (witmoer). Her coat (wentke) was made not from local material but invariably from choice Indian chintz, usually embellished with exotic patterns in a brownish red. She carried her bag to the right to indicate that she was now spoken for. The dog on the plate is probably to be interpreted as a symbolical reference to the couple’s fidelity to one another.  

Couples and families in similar costume also exist in the form of blanc de Chine and polychrome figures from the late 17th and 18th centuries. A drawing of one such couple is documented on a coromandel lacquer chest-of-drawers illustrated in Hervouët & Bruneau. (Emden 2015/1, p. 97 cat. 72)

 

For objects with identically decorated rim and a Dutch couple with dog, please see:  

The deer design symbolises best wishes for a career as an official and good fortune and prosperity. This is because the Chinese word for deer, lu, has the same sound as the word for the high salary of a Chinese official. Another reason for the association with Chinese scholar-bureaucrats or literati is that one of the concluding rituals of the provincial examinations that had to be passed if one was to become an official in the Chinese civil service was a party known as the Banquet of Auspicious Omens, ore more literally the Deer-cry Banquet. 

More frequently however, in Daoist mythology especially the spotted deer are considered auspicious animals connected to immortality. This is because they were believed to attain great age. Furthermore, they were the only animals able to locate and eat the special fungus of longevity, lingzhi. These special mushrooms were found on the paradise islands of Penglai. In Chinese mythology, the Penglai mountain is often called the base of the Eight Immortals, or at least where they travelled to have a banquet. In Chinese art, the spotted deer usually accompanies Shoulao or Magu, the God and Goddess of Longevity. Because of all this, even today the horns of deer have an important place in Chinese medicine and can be found in every Chinese apothecary shop. The soft internal part of the horns is dried, pulverised, and made up into pills. The inferior parts are boiled up into jelly or tincture. 

According to Bjaaland Welch, in Chinese legends the different colours of the deer signified the age: a 1000-year-old deer was depicted with grey fur, a white one for an impressive age of 5000 years. 

 

Condition: Some wear to the central decoration, firing flaws to the reverse rim and fleabites, frits and two chips to the rim.

  

References: 

Williamson 1927, pp.141-149

Beurdeley 1962, cat. 192

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1966, cat. 194

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1968, cat. 218

Williams 1976, pp. 115-116

Gordon 1977, cat. 73

Hervouët 1986, cat. 7.31

Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. I, cat. 127

Jörg 1986/2, pp.517-521

New York 1985, lot 77

Jörg 1989/2, cat. 76 & 77

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1989, p.209 & p. 220-221, Afb.G

Bartholomew 2006, p.102/164, also cat.5.7, 6.7, 6.7.5,7.16

Bjaaland Welch 2008, pp. 116-118

Antonin & Suebsman 2009, cat. 94

Ströber 2011, pp. 160-162

Sargent 2012, cat. 91

Emden 2105, cat. 72

 

Price: € 349 - $ 417 - £ 307

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2012104
2012104

Blue and White Kangxi Period wares 1662-1722 - Other wares

 

Object 2012104

 

Small salt

 

China

 

c.1700

 

Height 38 mm (1.49 inch), diameter top 58 mm (2.28 inch), diameter concave scale 38 mm (1.50 inch), diameter foot 59 mm (2.32 inch), weight 93 grams (3.28 ounce (oz.)) 

 

Small salt, the high domed body on three small ball feet, a recessed glazed base. The neck widening into a flat rim with a concave top. Decorated in underglaze blue with flowering peony plants alternating with small flowering plants. On the flat top and round the foot a zig-zag-lines pattern border, a lotus plant on top. Marked on the bottom with the symbol mark: artemisia leaf, underglaze blue.

 

Modelled after an European pewter or earthenware salt, the material and the Chinese style decoration made this salt an exotic object that was prominently placed on a richly laid table. At this time salts were ordered separately, and only much later as part of a dinner service. With many Christian connotations, salt was an important seasoning at dinner before the 19th century and salts were larger and more elaborate than they are today. (Howard 1994, p.125 & Jörg 2011/2, p.148)

 

Condition: A very tiny glaze rough spot to the top rim. A fleabite and five frits (one with a connected hairline) to the under/inside of the foot.

 

References:

Howard 1994, p.125 

Jörg 2011/2, p.148

 

Price: € 399 - $ 478 - £ 362

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2012086
2012086

Polychrome wares other since 1722

 

Object 2012086

 

Teapot

 

China

 

1730-1740

 

Height (with cover) 118 mm (4.65 inch), height (without cover) 83 mm (3.27 inch), diameter handle to spout 169 mm (6.65 inch), diameter of mouthrim 55 mm (2.17 inch), diameter of footring 52 mm (2.05 inch), weight with cover 356 grams (12.56 ounce (oz.)), weight cover 84 grams (2.96 ounce (oz.))

 

Globular teapot on footring, curved handle with a straight spout, domed and pierced cover with knob. Polychrome decorated in iron-red, gold, black and other overglaze enamels with a continuous river scene with a fisherman's boat, trees near a rocky bank, pagodas, pavilions a watchtower and a bridge with two figures, one walking the other on horseback. Round the rim a foliate and floral scroll border. The cover is decorated en suite.

 

The decoration shows a river scene with pagodas and pavilions which to contemplate the surrounding nature far from civilisation, a common theme on porcelain, especially from the mid-17th century onwards. The theme appears on ordinary as well as on expensive, high-class, and will certainly have been appreciated by Chinese scholars, who cherished a tradition of going back to nature and a simple life, leaving behind the stress of office or court for a time. Europeans, too, will have enjoyed such decorations as they gave an idealised impression of the Chinese countryside, thus confirming their romantic ideas about the Middle Kingdom. (Jörg & Van Campen 1997, p. 219)

  

Condition:

Teapot: A popped bubble of glaze with a tiny firing tension hairline to the handle, a chip, two frits and glaze rough spots to the tip of the spout.

Cover: A glaze rough spot to the knob and a chip with a hairline to the rim.

 

Reference:

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, p. 219

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2011665 & 2011666
2011665 & 2011666

Red & Gold / Rouge-de-Fer 1690-1730

 

Objects 2011665 & 2011666

 

A pair of small mugs


China

1710-1720

 

2011665: Height 62 mm (2.44 inch), diameter of rim 59 mm (2.32 inch), diameter of footring 60 mm (2.36 inch), weight 140 grams (4.94 ounce (oz.)) 

 

2011666: Height 62 mm (2.44 inch), diameter of rim 63 mm (2.48 inch), diameter of footring 63 mm (2.48 inch), weight 137 grams (4.83 ounce (oz.)) 

 

A pair of small mugs with handles on flat, unglazed, bases. Around the bases a single moulded circular ribs. Decorated in 'Red & Gold' / 'Rouge-de-fer' with iron-red and gold on the glaze with peacock feathers and coral branches in a large flower vase decorated with a flowering plant. The flower vase is placed on leaves and flanked by flower sprays. Round the rims a trellis pattern border with four reserves filled with a half flower head. On the handles a single flowering stem.

 

The large peacock feathers are a symbol of high rank, the coral branch stands for longevity. (Lunsingh Scheurleer 1974, p. 222)

 

Condition: 

2011665:A firing tension hairline to the handle and a (restored) frit to the rim.

2011666: A hairline to the rim.

 

Reference:

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1974, p. 222

  

Price: Sold.

 

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2012099
2012099

Red & Gold / Rouge-de-Fer 1690-1730

 

Object 2012099

 

Teacup and saucer

 

China

 

1700-1720

 

Height of teacup 44 mm (1.73 inch), diameter of rim 73 mm (2.87 inch), diameter of footring 31 mm (1.22 inch), weight 55 grams (1.94 ounce (oz.))

 

Height of saucer 21 mm (0.83 inch), diameter of rim 118 mm (4.65 inch), diameter of footring 60 mm (2.36 inch)), weight 79 grams (2.79 ounce (oz.))

 

Moulded teacup and saucer on footrings with everted scalloped sides and rims. Decorated in 'Red & Gold' or 'Rouge de Fer' with iron-red, black enamel and gold on the glaze with two ladies in a garden landscape near a fence with flowering plants, trees, clouds and the sun. On the sides large panels filled with flowering plants. The reverse is undecorated. The teacup is decorated en suite.

 

On this teacup and saucer we see a scene from the Xixiangji (The Romance of the Western Chamber), a comedy play in eight books by Wang Shifu (c.1250-1300). Here we see the two characters Yingying and Hongniang admiring flowers in the gardens of Pujiu Monastery. The student Zhang is about to see Yingying for the first time and fall in love with her. (Düsseldorf 2015, cat. 123.1)

 

For an identically decorated dish, please see:

Condition teacup: Some very tiny and shallow fleabites and frits and a short hairline  to the rim.

Condition saucer: Some frits, fleabites and a firing flaw to the footring, a shallow glaze rough spot to the rim.

 

Reference:

Düsseldorf 2015, cat. 123.1

 

Price: € 349 - $ 411 - £ 321

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2011724
2011724

Japanese Imari 1690-1800

 

Object 2011724

 

Dish

 

Japan

 

1700-1730

 

Height 35 mm (1.38 inch), diameter of rim 219 mm (8.62 inch), diameter of footring 115 mm (4.53 inch), weight 384 grams (13.54 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on footring, flat rim. On the base five spur-marks in a X-pattern. Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, iron-red and gold with two quails amongst flowering plants surrounded by a border of half chrysanthemum flower heads in gold on an underglaze blue ground. On the sides and rim leafy and flowering peony scrolls. The reverse is undecorated. 

 

The quail, or a pair of quails, fairly often used as a motif on fine porcelain, is a symbol of courage because of its fighting qualities. (Jörg & Van Campen 1997, p.213)

 

Condition: A hairline to the rim.

 

Reference:

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, p.213

 

Price: € 199 - $ 234 - £ 180

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2012095
2012095

Delft Faience 1640-1730 / Other Earthenware - Delft Faience 1640-1730

 

Object 2012095

 

Dish

 

Dutch (Delft)

 

Second half 18th century

 

Height 23 mm (0.91 inch), diameter of rim 229 mm (9.02 inch), diameter of footring 105 mm (4.13 inch), weight (including steel frame) 363 grams (12.80 ounce (oz.))

 

Earthenware dish, straight rim with a flat foot. Fitted in a steel frame. Decorated in different shades of blue on a white tin glaze in Chinese kraak style with a duck in a marsh landscape with peonies and clouds looking up at a duck in flight in a centre sixtagonal medallion. On the sides and rim six broad panels containing peaches and artemisia leaves and six narrow panels filled with dotss. The reverse is undecorated. The footring has been double pierced.

 

The dish is decorated in a way Chinese kraak porcelain of the 2nd quarter of the 17th century was decorated. (Rinaldi 1989, p.137)

   

For a similarly decorated, original Chinese kraak dish, please see:

Condition: Missing pieces of  glaze to the rim.

 

Reference:

Rinaldi 1989, p.137

 

Price: € 299 - $ 348 - £ 267

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2012077
2012077

Famille Verte 1680-1725

 

Object 2012077

 

A miniature 'doll's house' vase

 

China

 

c.1700

 

Height 57 mm (2.24 inch), diameter 30 mm (1.18 inch), diameter of mouthrim 14 mm (0.55 inch), diameter of footring 16 mm (0.63 inch), weight 25 grams (0.88 ounce (oz.))

 

Moulded miniature 'doll's house' vase on footring. Decorated in various overglaze famille verte enamels with a border of ascending pointed lotus leaves around the footring, on the body four moulded panels each filled with a single flowering stem, around the neck two sprays of grasses.

 

At the beginning of the 18th century, there was a fashion among wealthy Dutch ladies to have models made on the scale of a house, the so called 'doll's houses'. The rooms of these doll's houses were furnished with miniature pieces of porcelain, furniture, paintings, upholstery and all other sorts of objects that would have belonged to the interior of a wealthy home. These doll's houses were very costly and certainly not meant for children to play with but were proudly displayed for friends and visitors and regarded as extremely luxurious items - counterparts of the cabinets of curiosities that were a fashionable hobby of rich men. Only a few of these doll's houses have been preserved. One example can be found in the Gemeentemuseum in The Hague showing an 18th century room with porcelain miniatures in cupboards and on brackets along the wall. In reality, the majority of these "miniature doll's house vases" would have been part of the interior. A good example of an authentic porcelain room is the famous cabinet in Pommersfelden Castle, Germany, where groups of pieces on brackets are surrounded by these miniature vases lining the borders of the consoles. (Jörg & Flecker 2001, pp.50-51)

 

Condition: A popped bubble of glaze to the outer footring caused by the firing process and some firing flaws to the base.

 

Reference:

Jörg & Flecker 2001, pp.50-52

 

Price: € 199 - $ 212 - £ 170

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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Kraak Porcelain wares 1570-1645 - Bowls

 

Object 2012027

 

Bowl

 

China

 

1630-1645

 

Height 151 mm (5.95 inch), diameter of rim 337 mm (13.27 inch), diameter of footring 144 mm (5.67 inch), weight 2,657 grams (93.72 ounce (oz.))

 

2012027 2

 

2012027 13

 

 

Bowl on footring, straight rim with foliated edge. Kiln sand adhering to the inner footring. Decorated in underglaze blue with a riverscape with houses, trees and figures in a central medallion surrounded by a broad floral scroll border. Both in- and outside walls are divided in six large and six narrow panels. The large panels have a floral scroll border, three are filled with Chinese figures and river scenes with houses and trees, the other three are filled with Iznik-like flowers, the narrow panels are filled with tulips and flowers. Above the footring a broad floral scroll border.

 

According to Rinaldi this bowl can be classified as a Shape VI.3 bowl with Transitional features (c.1635-1650). The shape and body of these bowls comply with kraak characteristics, yet their decoration has adopted features typical of the Transitional style: it is much more elaborate and stylized and includes narrative scenes with figures as well as Dutch flowers, tulips and Iznik style flowers. The centre medallions offer a very wide selection of motifs, either typically Chinese or with European influence. The broad border around the centre medallion is decorated with a variety of motifs, like simple or floral scrolls, palmettes and semicircles. Both inside and outside walls are divided in large and narrow panels from three to six each. The large panels have a border with scrolls or vegetal motifs and are usually filled with extremely stylized and thinly-drawn flowers with Iznik influence or with European houses with Chinese figures. The narrow panels are filled with tulips and thinly-drawn flowers with Iznik influence. These bowls are an exact parallel with Border IX dishes and should be dated accordingly: 1635-1650. Curiously, while there are several Border IX dishes in the Topkapi Saray, there are no bowls with Transitional features. This would indicate that the production was mainly intended for the Dutch home market where most of these bowls are still to be found today. (Rinaldi 1989, pp.163-164)

 

Although the manufacture and the division into panels are still in kraak style, the decoration is Transitional, in particular the use of the 'tulip' motif. It has been suggested that the spinner and the houses were derived from European prints and drawings, but there is no evidence for this as yet. (Jörg 1984, pp.54-55, cat. 11 & Jörg 2011/1, pp.144-145, cat. 40)

 

For identically shaped, sized and decorated with the riverscape motif bowls, please see:

For another identically shaped and sized bowl, decorated with 'the Spinner'' motif,  please see:

For another identically shaped and sized bowl that on the outer wall is decorated with a continuous landscape scene with various figures in a typical Chinese style but on the inside is decorated with the same large and narrow panels filled with European houses with Chinese figures and tulips and thinly-drawn flowers with Iznik influence, please see:

Another extremely rare, unusually large Dutch (Delft) faience bowl closely follows a Chinese model in shape and size, but the panels are decorated with Chinoiseries composed of exotic Chinese decorative elements rendered in a personal, Western way by the painter in Delft, please see:

Condition: Some glaze rough spots to the rim, two hairlines and to re-stuck pieces to the wall.

 

References:

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1981, cat. 73

Jörg 1982/2, cat. 61

Jörg 1983, cat. 11

Jörg 1984, cat. 11

Rinaldi 1989, pp.163-164, Pl.203

Jörg 2011/1, cat. 40 & 41

 

Price: Sold.

 

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