Pater Gratia Oriental Art

Recent Acquisitions

On this page you'll find my latest acquisitions, It may, however, take some time for all objects to load.

 

This way you can quickly browse through my recently acquired objects without having to browse through all the various categories.

 

After four weeks each object in 'Recent Acquisitions' will be moved to their specific category.

 

Latest update; November 24, 2020.

 

Two new categories named 'Bargain SALE Chinese porcelain' and 'Bargain SALE Japanese porcelain' have been created. The categories can be found in the left side menu.

 

In these categories Chinese and Japanese export porcelain objects for sale are now offered at a significantly reduced price.

 

If you are interested in a purchase, or want more information, one of the objects in these categories please feel free to contact me at: patergratiaorientalart@hotmail.com.

2012367
2012367

Chinese Imari 1700-1800 - Tea, Coffee and Chocolate wares

 

Object 2012367

 

Teapot

 

China

 

1700-1720

 

Height including the cover 99 mm (3.90 inch), diameter handle to spout 175 mm (6.89 inch), diameter of mouthrim 64 mm (2.52 inch), diameter of footring 62 mm (2.44 inch), weight with cover 411 grams (14.50 ounce (oz.)), weight cover 36 grams (1.27 ounce (oz.))

 

Teapot of globular shape on a footring. Straight spout with a curved C-shaped handle. The inlaying flat cover (pierced) with round knob. Chinese Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, and overglaze iron-red, green and black enamel and gold with on either side a stylized 12-petal chrysanthemum crest, (kiku no mon). The petals are decorated in gold and iron-red, gold reserved on an underglaze blue ground and iron-red on a densely painted green-speckled ('frog's-spawn') ground. Those in gold reserved on an underglaze blue ground show either a lozenge / diaper pattern (tasuki) or scale pattern. Those in red and gold show designs of a stylised fungus.  Those in iron-red on a densely painted green-speckled ('frog's-spawn') ground also show a stylised fungus. The stylized 12-petal chrysanthemum crest is flanked by two large leaves and leafy scrolls. Round the mouth a border with two rows with stylised half flowerheads. On the spout and handle scattered stylised clouds. Round the attachments of the handle and the spout stylised cloud pattern borders.

 

Chinese porcelain producers developed new types of decorations in the early 18th century, Chinese Imari being one of them. It is characterized by a combination of underglaze blue and overglaze red and gold. Details are sometimes in black and green enamels. This development was a reaction to the success of Japanese Imari porcelain with a similar colour scheme. Sometimes Chinese imitations, (see the decoration on this particlar teapot) are direct copies of Japanese examples but more often Chinese Imari is decorated with typical Chinese motifs that are closely related to the underglaze-blue patterns of the period. However, the use of red and gold makes Chinese Imari more lavish. Landscapes, flowering plants, birds and mythical creatures are recurring motifs. Depictions of humans are less frequent and apart from armorial pieces, European designs are quite rare. The shapes fit into the normal export assortment. Chinese Imari was not only in demand in the West, but also in south-east Asia, India, and the Ottoman Empire. In the VOC (Dutch East India Company, 1602–1799) records it is called 'Chinese-Japanese' and in addition to blue and white and enamelled wares, this was a standard type in the Company's assortment that was bought in Canton until the end of the 18th century.

 

Chinese Imari usually confined itself to iron-red, underglaze blue, and gold, but occasionally it was enriched with famille verte panels. It was based on the Japanese wares of a similar type made in the Arita kilns and exported to Europe in enormous quantities from the port of Imari in the Southern Island. (Boulay 1984, p.252)

 

The production of Chinese Imari starting in the early years of the 18th century, reached its peak in the 1720s and 1730s, but became formalised and repetitive in the next decades. Although Chinese Imari was primarily produced for export, it may be noted that there are some pieces in this style in the Palace Museum, Beijing. If these really were part of the imperial collection and not later additions, they are an indication that Chinese Imari was also appreciated by the Chinese an probably served as some kind of "Western" exotic ware. (Jörg & Van Campen 1997, pp.199-200)

 

Condition: A firing tension hairline to the underside of the attachment of the handle.

 

References:

Boulay 1984, p.252

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, pp.199-200

 

Price: Sold.

 

More pictures >>

2012365
2012365

Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - Dishes

 

Object 2012365

 

Dish

 

Japan

 

1700-1720

 

Height 40 mm (1.57 inch), diameter of rim 225 mm (8.86 inch), diameter of footring 135 mm (5.31 inch), weight 504 grams (17.78 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on footring, straight rim. On the base three spur-marks. Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, iron-red, green, yellow and black enamel and gold with a stylized 12-petal chrysanthemum crest, (kiku no mon). The petals are decorated in gold and iron-red and gold reserved on an underglaze blue ground. Those in gold reserved on an underglaze blue ground show either a lozenge / diaper pattern (tasuki) or floral scrolls. Those in red and gold show designs of a flowering peony or a swastika / diaper pattern. The central decoration is surrounded by a continuous swirling clouds pattern border in iron-red. On the sides six reserves filled with a river scape alternating with a flowering chrysanthemum plant. in between the reserves half flower heads with leafy scrolls in gold on an underglaze blue ground. The reverse with three wide spread interlocking chrysanthemum sprays, round the outer footring a continuous swirling clouds pattern border in iron-red. On the base a single concentric band.

 

Although some types of chrysanthemum begin flowering in the summer, the chrysanthemum is primarily an indication of autumn. Like many autumn motifs the chrysanthemum evokes feelings of melancholy in Japan, as is beautifully expressed in a poem by the 9th-century Ki no Tomonori:

 

tsuyu nagara / to wear in my hair

arite kazasamu / I plucked a chrysanthemum

kiku no hana / with dew still clinging to it

aisenu aki no / oh may this present

hisashikarubeku / autumn's youth last forever

 

For dishes with a similarly large central chrysanthemum crest, (kiku no mon), please see:

For a dish with a similarly large central chrysanthemum crest, (kiku no mon), formerly part of the Dresden collection formed by Friedrich August or August the Strong, Elector of Saxony and King of Poland please see:

The crackled glaze is caused by the unequal contraction of the body and the glaze during cooling in the kiln after firing. (Jörg & Van Campen 1997, p.235)

 

Condition: Perfect.

 

References:

Kassel 1990, cat. 286

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, p.235

London 1997, cat. 119

Suchomel 1997, cat. 104, 156 & 197

Düsseldorf 2000, cat. 58

Impey 2002, cat. 354

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 126, 247 & 247a

Kyushu 2003, cat. 2789

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2012354
2012354

Japanese Tea, Coffee and Chocolate wares 18th Century

 

Object 2012354

 

Teacup

 

Japan

 

Late 17th century

 

Height 44 mm (1.73 inch), diameter of rim 75 mm (2.95 inch), diameter of footring 32 mm (1.26 inch), weight 57 grams (2.01 ounce (oz.))

 

Bowl on footring, spreading sides with a slightly everted rim. Decorated in iron-red, green, yellow and black enamel and gold with four peony flower sprays. On the bottom a single peony flower spray in a single. iron-red concentric band. The inner rim with a border of x's alternating with dots in gold.

 

The absence of underglaze blue, may or may not follow kiln practice. Evidence from potsherds at kiln-sites does not suggest that some kilns made either the one or the other, rather that all kilns seem to have made both. On the other hand, there is a tendency in most examples for those pieces without underglaze blue to be more finely decorated and to bear more refined enamels; this may mean that they were emulating the Kakiemon, and therefore it seems more likely that this would have been the practice of some kilns and not others.

 

For other similarly decorated objects please see:

Condition: Perfect.

 

Reference:

Impey 2002, pp.195-195

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2012361
2012361

Japanese Tea, Coffee and Chocolate wares 18th Century

 

Object 2012361

 

Bowl

 

Japan

 

1710-1730

 

Height 70 mm (2.76 inch), diameter of rim 139 mm (5.47 inch), diameter of footring 59 mm (2.32 inch), weight 213 grams (7.51 ounce (oz.))

 

Bowl on footring, spreading sides. Imari decorated in underglaze blue, iron-red and gold with three kidney-shaped panels reserved on a dark blue ground filled with flowering plants and birds. The panels are flanked by three flowerheads on a dark blue ground with leafy scrolls in gold. On the bottom a single flower spray.

 

This bowl, was probably once part of a coffee or tea service and would have been used as a rinse bowl. For other parts of this service please see the 'More pictures >>'.

 

Condition: A fleabite to the rim.

 

Price: Sold.

 

More pictures >>

2012366
2012366

Chinese Imari 1700-1800

 

Object 2012366

 

Dish

China

c.1710-1725

 

Height 33 mm (1.30 inch), diameter of rim 210 mm (8.27 inch), diameter of footring 115 mm (4.53 inch), weight 356 grams (12.56 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on footring the sides with twelve impressed lotus-petal panels, the rim scalloped. Chinese Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, iron-red, black enamel and gold on the glaze with two ladies in a garden landscape near a fence with flowering plants a tree and pierced rockwork. On the sides twelve moulded lotus-petal panels filled with flowering plants alternating with flowerpots filled with flowering plants. Along the rim a diaper pattern with a single flower head. The reverse is undecorated.

 

Romance of the Western Chamber

 

The love story' Romance of the Western Chamber' (Xixiang ji) ranks among the most famous literary works of China. Its importance for young people can be compared to that of Shakespeare's 'Romeo and Juliet' in the West. 'Romance of the Western Chamber' was written by Wang Shifu (1260-1336). There already existed a short story in the Tang dynasty titled 'Biography of Yingying' (Yingying Zhuan) by Yuan Zhen (779-831), but Wang Shifu adapted it by adding details and giving it a happy rather than a sad ending. It tells the story of a forbidden love affair between the civil servant Zhang Sheng, who is gifted, but of a poor family background, and the pretty Cui Yingying, daughter of the Prime Minister. The two young people have their first encounter in a Buddhist temple, where Yingying and her mother have taken lodgings when accompanying the coffin of the recently deceased father back home. Suddenly, the temple is besieged by a local gang of outlaws, who demand the daughter to be handed over. Yingying's mother promises her daughter's hand in marriage to whoever saves the daughter from falling into the hands of the gang leader. However, when Zhang succeeds in doing so with the help of General Du, his childhood friend, she does not keep her promise. The young couple start a secret affair, supported by Hongniang ('Lady in Red'), Yingying's maid. When Yingying's mother discovers the affair, she consents to the marriage on the condition that Zhang passes the final examination for the highest position in the civil service of the capital, Zhang does so well, that he is granted a top position. (Suebsman 2019, p.43)

 

On this dish we see the two characters Yingying and Hongniang admiring flowers in the gardens of Pujiu Monastery. The student Zhang is about to see Yingying for the first time and fall in love with her. (Düsseldorf 2015, cat. 123.1 & Suebsman 2019, p.44)

 

For an identically, shaped, sized and decorated dish in a private North German collection, please see:

The design with the twelve impressed lotus-petal panels can also be found on on Chinese dishes, decorated in famille verte enamels from the period 171-1725, with the arms of Dutch cities and provinces. For examples of these type of dishes please see:

Condition: Some firing flaws, caused by the firing process to the reverse, some wear to the decoration and some glaze rough spots to the rim.

 

References:

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, cat. 378

Jörg 2011/2, cat. 160

Düsseldorf 2015, cat. 123.1 

Emden 2015/1, p.58

Suebsman 2019, p.44

 

Price: € 699 - $ 827 - £ 627

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

More pictures >>

2012345
2012345

Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - 'Gold' Imari

 

Object 2012345

 

Covered bowl

 

Japan

 

1700-1720

  

Height with cover 100 mm (3.94 inch), height without cover 63 mm (2.48 inch), diameter 111 mm (4.37 inch), diameter of footring 55 mm (2.17 inch), weight with cover 364 grams (12.84 ounce (oz.)), weight cover 155 grams (5.47 ounce (oz.))

 

Covered bowl on footring. Straight sides, domed cover with strap handle. 'Gold' Imari, decorated in gold, iron-red and a pink-gold wash with on the box three groups of flowering plants, each with a pair of birds, namely millet and quail, The cover is decorated en suite, the strap handle is decorated in gold.

 

A group that seems to have been especially favoured in The Netherlands, traditionally called 'Gold Imari', dates to the early 18th century. These wares are painted in gold only, in gold and iron-red, or in gold and red with a few touches of green, aubergine and black. 'Gold Imari' is relatively well represented in collections in the northern parts of The Netherlands but which occurs less often in old English and German collections

 

From about 1700 the gold often has a pink-violet hue ('pink lustre'), which is clearly visible on the white porcelain background when the gold is very thin or has been rubbed off. It seems that the Japanese enamellers used a different process to the Chinese, because Chinese pieces do not have this pink violet hue. (Jörg 2003/1, pp.92-93)

 

This covered bowl is a magnificent example of the 'gold' Imari group. No underglaze blue or other enamels are used, the light pinkish wash lending sufficient contrast to the brighter red and gold. Besides dinner services, covered jars, tea, coffee and chocolate sets, decorated in 'Gold' Imari with this design, also other utilitarian or luxury items, like this coverd bowl, were ordered after a Western model. These included cylindrical beer mugs, barbers' bowls, cuspidors and chamber-pots therefore this covered bowl can be considered a Japon de commande object. (Jörg 2003/1, p.164, cat. 188)

 

In the collection of Oriental Ceramics of the Groninger Museum is an identically decorated teaset that consists of an identical teapot / hot water pot, six cups and saucers for tea or coffee, six chocolate cups with covers and saucers, a bowl with an overturned rim that might have been a sugar bowl and a ewer which may have been used as a milk jug but could also have been a condiment jug in a dinner set with the same design of which parts are also in the Groninger Museum. The set entered the Groninger Museum in 1899 as a bequest of the local collector, Mr. Mello Backer. Some sherds of similar wares have been excavated at Deshima. (Jörg 2003/1, p.201 & p.213)

 

The quail, closely allied to the partridge, is an emblem of courage both in China and Japan, as it is highly esteemed as a fighting bird. On Japanese porcelain they are frequently depicted amidst autumn grasses under millet. This quail and millet design, symbolizing the autumn is especially common on Kakiemon, but is also found on ko Kutani, Imari and blue-and-white wares. It has been suggested that that particular form is copied from the work of the painter Tosa Mitsuoki (1607-1691), but it probably originated from Chinese Paintings of the Sung period. This motif has been copied on European porcelain, especially at Bow and Chelsea where it is used as a decoration on the so-called 'partridge plates' and also on Meissen Porcelain. (Arts 1983, pp.134-135

  

The shape, most likely, derived from a European (silver) model, it was used as a small tureen. Jörg describes a bowl with cover on three low feet with a matching saucer this may indicate that originally the covered box also might have had a matching saucer. (Jörg 2003/1, p.110, cat. 113)

 

For identically decorated dishes decorated with the 'millet and quail' design, please see;

For the identically decorated tea-set with the 'millet and quail' design in the collection of Oriental ceramics of the Groninger Museum, please see:

For a similarly decorated dish with the 'millet and quail' design, please see;

For other objects, for sale or sold, identically decorated with the 'millet and quail' design, please see;

Condition: Some wear to the golden decoration on the strap handle and a firing flaw to the cover.

 

References:

Arts 1983, pp.134-135

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, p.235

London 1997, cat. 95

Arita 2000, cat. 81-85

Düsseldorf 2000, cat. 10

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 113, 116, 123 & 256 

Suebsman 2019, cat. 53

 

Price: € 499 - $ 592 - £ 449

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

More pictures >>

2012344
2012344

Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - Imari with no Underglaze Blue, Iron-red and Gold only

 

Object 2012344

 

Bowl

 

Japan

 

1700-1730

 

Height 80 mm (3.14 inch), diameter of rim 155 mm (6.10 inch), diameter of footring 63 mm (2.48 inch), weight 375 grams (13.23 ounce (oz.))

 

Bowl on footring, spreading sides. Imari, decorated in iron-red and gold with a hôô bird or Japanese pheasant (Phasianus versicolor) in flight above flowering plants alternating with grasses, bamboo and flowering chrysanthemum and lotuses. Round the footring a broad band in gold. On the bottom a flower spray. 

 

In category 36 'Coloured Imari with no underglaze blue, iron-red and gold only' of his Japanese export porcelain, Impey states that the implication of this singular restriction of palette, without the use of underglaze blue, is that these may be the product of a single enamelling workshop, but may or may not be the product of a single kiln. The restriction is probably one of choice, for it would hardly be cheaper, if at all, to use a wider range of enamels, and no cheaper to use underglaze blue. (Impey 2002, pp.220-221)

 

The exotic birds depicted are most likely two hôô birds or two Japanese pheasants (Phasianus versicolor). The hôô is a mythical bird originating from China, a composite creature, whose composing elements vary, although in Japan it remains essentially a mixture between a cockerel, a pheasant and a bird of paradise. Japanese pheasants (Phasianus versicolor) are, given their different heads, presumably supposed to be a pair, but in fact only the male has an elaborate tail that can be spread out like a fan. (Fitski 2011, pp.158-159)

 

Condition: Perfect.

 

References:

Impey 2002, pp.220-221

Fitski 2011, pp.158-159

 

Price: Sold.

 

More pictures >>

2012347
2012347

Japanese Blue and White wares 18th Century

 

Object 2012347

 

Dish

 

Japan

 

c.1700

 

Height 29 mm (1.14 inch), diameter of rim 172 mm (6.77 inch), diameter of footring 106 mm (4.17 inch), weight 317 grams (11.18 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on footring, straight rim with an underglaze dark brown edge. On the base four spur-marks in a Y-pattern. Decorated in underglaze blue with a coastal scene with a pagoda, trees and in the background fishing nets drying on poles encircled by an eight pointed scalloped medallion. The sides and rim in Chinese Kraak-style with eight large panels containing peach and auspicious symbols and six narrow panels filled with a scale pattern and dots. On the reverse six ogival or oval-shaped panels filled with lozenges and dots alternating with narrow undecorated panels. On the base the Chinese four-character mark; Da Ming nian zhi (made during the Great Ming dynasty) in a single concentric band. (Davison 1994, cat. 852)

 

In present-day Dutch collections, Japanese dishes and plates with Chinese kraak designs are still common and must have been an important part of the export shipments. Unfortunately, official VOC shipping lists only occasionally specify decorations in such detail that we can identify these kraak-style pieces. The kraak style was reserved largely for dishes, plates and saucers. Examples have normal borders divisions of wide and narrow panels while the centre shows the highly popular designs of a flower vase on a terrace, a river landscape with birds or flowering plants with a cricket. (Jörg 2003/1, p.23

 

The underglaze dark brown edge on this dish is rare on Japanese dishes decorated in blue-and-white of this period. It was probably copied after earlier Kakiemon dishes with similar underglaze dark brown edges. 

 

The crackled glaze is caused by the unequal contraction of the body and the glaze during cooling in the kiln after firing. (Jörg & Van Campen 1997, p.235)

 

Condition: Fine crazing to the glaze caused by the firing process.

 

References:

Davison 1994, cat. 852

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, p.235)

Jörg 2003/1, p.23 

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2012331
2012331

Famille Verte 1680-1725

 

Object 2012331

 

Dish

 

China

 

c.1700 

 

Height 33 mm (1.30 inch), diameter of rim 211 mm (8.30 inch), diameter of footring 114 mm (4.49 inch), weight 346 grams (12.20 ounce (oz.))

 

Lobed dish on a footring, with spreading sides, and a lobed rim. Decorated in typical famille verte enamels: various shades of green, overglaze yellow, gray, black, iron-red and gold with in the centre a large lotus flower head surrounded by a band of swastikas with coins alternating with swastikas with a flower head on an iron-red ground. On the sides eight radiating panels containing flowering plants alternating with a boy holding a trailing lotus on a lambent salmon ground with swastikas or scrolls in gold and flowering lotuses. Around the rim a border with flower heads alternating with lozenges filled with a swastikas on a densely painted green-speckled ('frog's-spawn') ground. The reverse is undecorated.

 

Most famille verte objects are decorated with flowers, flowering plants, blossoming trees, all kinds of animals including mythical ones, and slender Chinese women strolling in a garden, often accompanied by a small boy. Porcelain with flower and plant motifs, as well as landscapes without animals or figures, could be sold to Islamic customers; objects with animals and especially figures did well in the West, although a strict division certainly should not be made. Apart from studying the individual flowers and their meanings, it might also be interesting to regard the many flowers and flowering plants depicted on a piece of famille verte as symbolising a grand total, a reflection of a Chinese garden. The Chinese regard gardens as miniature landscapes, where a balance is attained between yin and yang, and the flow of rejuvenating cosmic energy (qi) is evident. (Jörg 2011/2, p.37)

 

The depiction of a boy or boys among foliage became a popular motif on Chinese ceramics as well as on textiles and lacquer ware. According to Confucian philosophy, abundant male offspring was considered essential to perform the duties of the family in society and the rituals and sacrifices for the deceased ancestors. Only sons guaranteed the survival of the family name. A son should pass the civil service examinations, become an official, and bring honour to his family. Lotus in this context is pronounced lian, which is a pun for lian, meaning continuous, forming the rebus of a wish for many sons. The boys are traditionally dressed as babies. Their hair is shaved, except for three small tufts of hair, the traditional hairstyle for little boys (Ströber 2011, cat. 72), (Bartholomew 2006, p.58-59, cat. 3.4 & cat. 3.4.2 & 3.16.1

 

The reserved painting on the iron-red ground is characteristic of the famille verte painting programme, but because it was complicated, time-consuming and therefore expensive it was seldom produced after 1720. (Jörg 2011/2, p.50)

 

The salmon pigment is derived from iron oxide and was an innovation of the late Kangxi period. (Düsseldorf 2015, p.181, cat. 97)

 

Condition: Some glaze rough spots to the lobed rim, a fleabite and a chip to the rim and a short glaze hairline to the reverse (only visible on the reverse).

 

References: 

Bartholomew 2006, p.58-59, cat. 3.4 & cat. 3.4.2 & 3.16.1

Jörg 2011/2, p.37 & p.50

Ströber 2011, cat. 72

Düsseldorf 2015, p.181, cat. 97

 

Price: € 1.499 - $ 1,750 - £ 1,351

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

More pictures >>

2012340
2012340

Kraak Porcelain wares 1570-1645 - Klapmutsen

 

Object 2012340

 

Klapmuts

 

China

 

1609-1625

 

Height 52 mm (2.05 inch), diameter of rim 105 mm (4.13 inch), diameter of footring 39 mm (1.53 inch), weight 56 grams (1.98 ounce (oz.))

 

A small, thinly potted klapmuts (bowl) with shallow rounded sides, a flat up-turned rim with a a bracket-lobbed edge and low, V-shaped footring that slants slightly inwards. Decorated in deep shades of underglaze blue with a large artemisia leaf drawn on top of a double gourd bottle and two crossed tassels over ribbons in a center medallion. The sides and rim are divided into four wide and narrow radiating panels outlined in blue. The wide panels are faintly moulded with bracket-lobed panels, each alternately enclosing single peach sprays and flower sprays, and surmounted by an elongated monster mask. The narrow panels are moulded with vertical bands and decorated with two pending ribbons. On the outside four bracket-lobed panels enclosing jewels and four dots, each separated by a narrow radiating panel painted with a thick line. The underside of the rim is decorated with two wide spread flower heads between scrolls. The recessed base is glazed. Coarse sand from the kiln has adhered to the inner footring. (Welsh 2008, p.212)

  

According to Rinaldi this klapmuts can be classified as a group V klapmuts. In these klapmutsen the rim is divided into four large and four narrow panels in the most typical kraak style The four large and slightly triangular panels are decorated with a monster mask, while the narrow sections extend, without interruption, from rim to centre medallion and are covered with a continuous design, usually a bow hanging from a ruyi head or a more elaborate motif. This group acquired its definitive stylistic shape around the first years of the seventh century and continued to be produced in massive  for the rest of the first half of the century. They are most common of all klapmutsen and were produced in almost all sizes. The mask is often referred to as taotie, one of the oldest symbols used in Chinese decoration. It was represented as early as the Shang Dynasty (1600-1100) BC on bronze and later on jade. There are many variations of the taotie mask, whose purpose was to ward off evil spirits. It is interesting to note that though referred to as a taotie, the representation on the klapmuts is, in fact, most unlike the traditional Chinese monster mask. Instead it has a definite resemblance to a gala, the mythological Indian glutton who was punished by having to eat his own body until only the mouth and upper part of the head and two tiny hands remain. (Rinaldi 1989, pp.129-133)

 

The 'artemisia' leaf is the symbol of healing and health and considered a good omen to the Chinese. When placed over the housed door it is thought to dispel sickness. It is also used to celebrate anniversary of the rebel Huang Chao. In ancient times, the Chinese also used the veins of the 'artemisia' leave for prophecy. The gourd bottle is the symbol of mystery and longevity and its shape is suitable as a receptacle for medicine. The gourd bottle is also the emblem of Li Tieh Kuai, one of the Eight Daoist Immortals, who holds the bottle in his hand denoting his power of setting his spirit free from his body. (Sjostrand & Lok Lok 2007, p.272 & p.274)

 

For identically decorated objects, please see:

Condition: Perfect with some firing flaws, caused by the firing process, to the bottom, base and footring.

 

References: 

Rinaldi 1989, pp.129-133, Pl. 139

Sjostrand & Lok Lok 2007, p.272, p.274, Serial No. 2459 & Serial No. 7475

Welsh 2008, p.212

 

Price: € 499 - $ 590 - £ 452

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

More pictures >>

2012322
2012322

Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - 'Gold' Imari

 

Object 2012322

 

Bowl with cover and stand

 

Japan

 

1710-1730

 

Dish: height 33 mm (1.29 inch), diameter of rim 180 mm (7.09 inch), diameter of footring 92 mm (3.62 inch), weight 298 grams (10.51 ounce (oz.))

Bowl (without cover): height 60 mm (2.36 inch), diameter of rim 112 mm (4.41 inch), diameter of footring 50 mm (1.97 inch), weight 150 grams (5.29 ounce (oz.))

Cover: height 24 mm (0.94 inch), diameter of rim 92 mm (3.62 inch), diameter of ring 35 mm (1.38 inch), weight 70 grams (2.47 ounce (oz.))

 

Ribbed dish on footring, everted lobed rim. Bowl on footring, steep sides with spreading lobbed rim. the ribbed cover with ring and lobed rim. 'Gold' Imari decorated in underglaze blue and overglaze iron-red, green, gray and black enamel and gold. The dish with a central design of a zigzag plank bridge in a garden landscape with various flowering plants and clouds in underglaze blue with outlining in gold. On the sides and rim cloud-like partitions with flower sprays, foliate scrolls alternating with paulownia branches and two phoenixes one standing and one in flight. On the reverse three fruiting 'Buddha's hand citron' (Citrus medica) or finger lemon fruit, peach and pomegranate sprays. The bowl and cover are decorated en suite.

 

This type of decoration is traditionally called 'gold' Imari because of the lavish use of gold, on this bowl it is combined with overglaze green enamel, black and iron-red. (Jörg 2003/1, p.112)

 

An identicaly shaped, sized and decorated bowl with cover and stand is in the collection of Oriental ceramics in the Groninger Museum.

 

For an identically shaped and similarly decorated bowl and saucer without the underglaze blue decoration and without the cover, please see:

For identically decorated bowls without underglaze blue decoration, please see:

Condition:

Dish: Perfect.

Bowl: A short firing tension hairline to the base, caused by the firing process.

Cover: Perfect.

 

References:

Jörg 1983, cat. 11

Suchomel 1997, cat. 178

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 118 & 118a

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2012329
2012329

Shipwreck Porcelains - The Nanking Cargo, 1752 - Tea, Coffee and Chocolate wares

 

Object 2012329

 

A chocolate cup and saucer

 

China


c.1751

 

Provenance: The Nanking Cargo sale, Christie's Amsterdam, 28 April - 2 May 1986

 

Height of cup 69 mm (2.72 inch), diameter of rim 73 mm (2.87 inch), diameter of footring 35 mm (1.38 inch), weight 99 grams (3.49 ounce (oz.))

Height of saucer 25 mm (0.98 inch), diameter of rim 133 mm (5.24 inch), diameter of footring 78 mm (3.07 inch), weight 98 grams (3.46 ounce (oz.))

 

A chocolate cup and saucer on footrings, straight sides, slightly everted rim and scalloped handles. Chinese Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, overglaze iron-red and gold with the "Chrysanthemum Rock" pattern in blue and enamels. Painted with chrysanthemum, bamboo and daisy issuing around a jagged outcrop of rockwork, the tall tapering cup with elaborate scalloped loop handle of European inspiration. Inside the cup and in the centre of the saucer the original rectangular paper Christie's lot 5144/144 label. On the bases of both the cup and the saucer the original circular paper Christie's The Nanking Cargo sale lot 5144 labels proving they have been one of 144 similar chocolate cups and saucers sold in lot 5144. (Amsterdam 1986, p.235

 

On Monday January 3, 1752, the Dutch East India Company, (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie, VOC) ship Geldermalsen, struck a reef on her return journey to the Netherlands and sank in the South China Sea. Of the crew 32 survived and 80 went down with the ship and her cargo of tea, raw silk, textiles, dried wares, groceries, lacquer and porcelain. 

 

The cargo of Chinese porcelain was originally potted in Jingdezhen, Jiangzi province then shipped to Nanking for delivery to the VOC vessel Geldermalsen for final transportation to the Netherlands. The Geldermalsen struck a reef on her return journey to the Netherlands and sank in the South China Sea on January 3, 1752. The cargo was recovered by Captain Michael Hatcher and his team in 1985 and sold by Christie's Amsterdam on 28 April - 2 May 1985 as 'The Nanking Cargo. Chinese Export Porcelain and Gold' two hundred and thirty-five years later. (Jörg 1986/1. pp.39-59).

 

An interesting detail is that Captain Michael Hatcher found the wreck of the Geldermalsen on the same reef as he earlier, in 1983, found the wreck of a Chinese junk. both wrecks were about a mile apart. This Chinese Junk wreck came to be known as "The Hatcher Junk" she had a cargo of Kraak and Transitional porcelain objects that were dated c.1643. (Sheaf & Kilburn 1988, p.27)

 

In the auction catalogue 'The Nanking Cargo, Chinese Export porcelain and Gold', Christie's Amsterdam describes these chocolate cups as teacups.

 

Jörg states that in orders, shipping invoices and unpacking books from this period two types of chocolate cups and saucers are mentioned: with and without handles. The order for 1761 gives an exact description of such a cup: 70 mm (2.76 inch) high, with straight sides slightly sloping outwards and a diameter equal to its height. We even have a drawing of such a chocolate cup, part of the order made up in 1759. It looks exactly like the cups with scalloped handles found in the wreck. There is no question but that these are indeed chocolate cups. The same decoration of large flowers and bamboo near a rock is executed both in underglaze blue and Imari, as well in enamel colours. In all, 9,735 cups and saucers for chocolate had been bought in Canton. They also included enamelled high cups with round handles, which are indicated as a type in the drawing of 1758 too. Hatcher has recovered 2,263 pairs of chocolate cups and saucers with scalloped handles and 1.996 pairs with round handless. Apparently there were no chocolate cups without handle bought in 1751. (Jörg 1986/1, pp. 68-69)

 

Cups of this shape, which always have a handle, are usually called coffee cups, but in fact are chocolate cups. This is made clear from the numerous references and descriptions of "chocolate cups with handles" in the records of the Dutch East India Company (VOC). Orders state that "the cups must be straight without overhanging rims", the cup narrower inside. An average height of 70 mm is given and is stressed that the diameter of the rim should be equal to the height. Drawn models of 1758 which have fortunately been preserved, show four cups of this shape with different handles, which are specified as "chocolate cups" in the description. Large tea, coffee and chocolate services always included this type of cup, but they could be bought separately as well. Enamelled cups and saucers were bought by the Company for around 20 cents and sold in the Netherlands for around 50 cents apiece. (Jörg & Van Campen 1997, p.215)

 

The Geldermalsen History and Porcelain CJA Jorg, P69 cat 56

 

(Reproduced from; The Geldermalsen. History and Porcelain, (C.J.A. Jörg, Groningen 1986), p.69, fig. 56.)

 

The design on these chocolate cups is known as the 'Chrysanthemum Rock' pattern in blue and enamels. In total 1,469 chocolate cups and saucers with the 'Chrysanthemum Rock' pattern in blue and  enamels, were sold divided over the lots: 5139-5151 (Amsterdam 1986)

 

For a sold chocolate cup decorated the 'Chrysanthemum Rock' pattern in enamels, please see:

Condition:

Cup: Two fleabites and a chip tpo the rim.

Saucer: A short hairline to the rim.

 

References:

Jörg 1982/1, fig. 46

Amsterdam 1986, lot 5139-5151

Jörg 1986/1, pp.39-59 & fig. 54, 55 & 56

Sheaf & Kilburn 1988, p.27 & Pl.146

Howard 1997, cat. 19

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, cat. 240

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2012305
2012305

Japanese Tea, Coffee and Chocolate wares 18th Century

 

Object 2012305

 

Saucer

 

Japan

  

1700-1730

 

Height 23 mm (0.90 inch), diameter of rim 121 mm (4.76 inch), diameter of footring 51 mm (2.00 inch), weight 104 grams (3.67 ounce (oz.))

 

Saucer on footring, straight rim with a slightly everted edge. Imari decorated in underglaze blue with overglaze iron-red, green enamel, gold and a light-pinkish gold wash with a pearl with knotted ribbons in a central roundel. On the sides two dragons chasing a pearl through swirling clouds. The reverse is undecorated.

 

Chinese dragon, also known as Long or Lung, are legendary creatures in Chinese mythology, Chinese folklore and Chinese culture at large. Chinese dragons have many animal like forms such as turtles and fish, but are most commonly depicted as snake-like with four legs. They traditionally symbolize potent and auspicious powers, particularly control over water, rainfall, typhoons, and floods. The dragon is also a symbol of power, strength, and good luck for people who are worthy of it in East Asian culture. During the days of Imperial China, the Emperor of China usually used the dragon as a symbol of his imperial strength and power. Many pictures of Chinese dragons show a flaming pearl under their chin or in their claws. The pearl is associated with spiritual energy, wisdom, prosperity, power, immortality, thunder, or the moon. Chinese art often depicts a pair of dragons chasing or fighting over the flaming pearl. (source: Wikipedia)

 

The original Chinese design of a dragon chasing a flaming pearl can also be found on other Japanese export wares, for a sold Japanese mustard pot decorated with the design in blue-and-white, please see:

Condition: Perfect.

 

Reference:

Wikipedia

 

Price: € 149 - $ 175 - £ 135

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2012327
2012327

Japanese Tea, Coffee and Chocolate wares 18th Century

 

Object 2012327

 

Teacup and saucer

 

Japan

 

1700-1730

 

Height of teacup 41 mm (1.77 inch), diameter of rim 75 mm (2.95 inch), diameter of footring 35 mm (1.30 inch), weight 52 grams (1.80 ounce (oz.))

 

Height of saucer 22 mm (0.83 inch), diameter of rim 124 mm (4.69 inch), diameter of footring 70 mm (2.72 inch), weight 92 grams (3.56 ounce (oz.))

 

Teacup and saucer on footrings, slightly everted rims. The saucer with a spur-mark on the base. Imari decorated in underglaze blue, iron-red and gold with a vase filled with flowers on a low table in a central roundel. On the sides three kidney shaped panels, two filled with flower heads in gold on an underglaze blue ground and one with various flower heads, alternating with a wide spread flowering wisteria. Round the rim a zig-zag lines pattern border. On the reverse three flower sprays and on the base a single concentric band in underglaze blue. The teacup is decorated en suite

  

The decorative style on this teacup and saucer is very similar to that used on other, earlier sold, Japanese Imari tea ware. The translucent enamel colours, the zig-zag lines-pattern borders and the reverses with the three wide spread flower sprays are all very similar. This could indicate that these may be the product of a single workshop but may or may not be the product of a single kiln, specialised in these high-quality tea wares. Judging by Dutch 18th century sales and inventories, Japanese porcelain was quite expensive at the time and even more highly valued than its Chinese counterpart.

 

Condition

Teacup: Perfect.

Saucer: Perfect.

 

Reference:

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 276a

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2012326
2012326

Blue and White Kangxi Period 1662-1722 - Tea, Coffee and Chocolate wares

 

Object 2012326

 

Teapot

 

China

 

1700-1720

 

Height 100 mm (3.94 inch), diameter handle to spout 133 mm (5.24 inch), diameter of mouthrim 36 mm (1.41 inch), diameter of footring: 55 mm (2.17 inch), weight with cover 235 grams (8.29 ounce (oz.)), weight cover 41 grams (1.45 ounce (oz.))

 

Teapot, octagonal shaped on an octagonal footring. Straight spout and C-shaped handle. Domed cover with a round knob. Decorated in underglaze blue with flowering plants on each facet. Around the neck a spiral pattern border and on the handle and spout a single flowering stem. The cover is decorated en suite.

 

For an identically shaped, sized and in underglaze blue decorated teapot, please see:

For an identically shaped, sized and in Chinese Imari decorated teapot, please see:

Condition: Some glaze rough spots and a fleabite to the edge of the cover and a fleabite and frit to the tip of the spout.

 

Reference:

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1982/2, cat. 31

 

Price: € 749 - $ 882 - £ 677

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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