Pater Gratia Oriental Art

Recent Acquisitions

On this page you'll find my latest acquisitions, It may, however, take some time for all objects to load.

 

This way you can quickly browse through my recently acquired objects without having to browse through all the various categories.

 

After four weeks each object in 'Recent Acquisitions' will be moved to their specific category.

 

Latest update; September 28, 2020.

 

Two new categories named 'Bargain SALE Chinese' and 'Bargain SALE Japanese' have been created. The categories can be found in the left side menu.

 

In these categories Chinese and Japanese export porcelain objects for sale are now offered at a significantly reduced price.

 

If you are interested in a purchase, or want more information, one of the objects in these categories please feel free to contact me at: patergratiaorientalart@hotmail.com.

2012321
2012321

Famille Rose wares 1725-1800 - Tea, Coffee and Chocolate wares

 

Object 2012321

 

Teacup and saucer

 

China

 

1730-1740

 

Height of teacup 36 mm (1.72 inch), diameter of rim 65 mm (2.56 inch), diameter of footring 28 mm (1.10 inch), weight 28 grams (0.99 ounce (oz.))

Height of saucer 20 mm (0.79 inch), diameter of rim 106 mm (4.17 inch), diameter of footring 60 mm (2.36 inch), weight 45 grams (1.59 ounce (oz.))

 

Teacup and saucer on footring, spreading sides and everted rim. Decorated in various famille rose enamels with a seated woman watching naughty chicken in a landscape with flowering peony plants growing from taihu (garden) rocks. the saucer is decorated en suite.

 

Condition: 

Teacup: Some enamel loss and fleabites and frits to the rim. 

Saucer: Two fleabites to the reverse rim.

 

References:

Jacquemart & Le Blant 1862, pp. 77-105.

Jörg 2003/2, p.25, cat. 8.

 

Price: Sold.

 

More pictures >>

2012320
2012320

Shipwreck Porcelains - The Ca Mau Shipwreck, c.1725

 

Object 2012320

 

Jarlet

 

China

 

c.1725

 

Provenance: Made in Imperial China. 76.000 pieces of Chinese Export Porcelain from the Ca Mau shipwreck, circa 1725 sale, Sotheby's Amsterdam, 29, 30 & 31 January 2007.

 

Height 72 mm (2.83 inch), diameter 90 mm (3.54 inch), diameter of rim 71 mm (2.80 inch), diameter of base 55 mm (2.17 inch), weight 168 grams (5.92 ounce (oz.))

 

Baluster-shaped jarlet with an everted neck and a wide low rim. The base is unglazed. Undecorated. On the base handwritten in black ink: 'CM3 -28012', a rectangular paper label with the handwritten numbers: '45467/B' (in blue) and '32' (in red), the circular paper original Sotheby's - UNICOM, CA MAU - BINH THUAN label with number 59709 and the original Sotheby's sale AM0967 (MADE IN IMPERIAL CHINA 76,000 PICES OF CHINESE EXPORT PORCELAIN FROM THE CA MAU SHIPWRECK, CIRCA 1725) lot 1023/5 label. (Amsterdam 2007, p.230)

 

The Ca Mau Shipwreck, c.1725

 

The Ca Mau shipwreck was a Chinese ocean going junk, almost certainly en route from Canton (now Kuangzhou) to the Dutch trading port of Batavia (now Jakarta). Disaster struck of the Ca Mau peninsular, there was a fire on board so severe that some of the porcelain was fused together. There were a few wine cups recovered bearing the mark of the Emperor Yongzheng who reigned from 1723 to 1735. By this time tea and coffee was the rage throughout Europe and the principal traders were the British 'Honourable East India Company' and the Dutch East India Company, (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie, VOC). With the demand for tea came demand for porcelain by which to drink it and so most of what they imported in these year was tea wares.(Amsterdam 2007, pp.8-9)

 

The Ca Mau shipwreck was discovered by fishermen working of the Ca Mau peninsular when their nets snagged on it. When they realised the porcelain was saleable they began dredging up as much as possible. Once the Vietnamese Ministry of Culture and Information realised what was happening they moved in quickly to secure the wreck site. The excavation was led by the Curator of The National Museum of Vietnamese culture. In all, 130,000 pieces were recovered and 76,000 of the finer condition pieces were selected to be sold as 'Made in Imperial China. 76,000 pieces of Chinese Export Porcelain from the Ca Mau Shipwreck, circa 1725' by Sotheby’s Amsterdam on 29, 30 & 31 January 2007. (Amsterdam 2007, pp.6-7

 

The Ca Mau wreck was first reported on in the daily newspaper Tuoi Tre (Youth) on May the 5th 1998. Accordingly, the authority of Binh Thuan province had confiscated 32,569 artefacts and 2,4 tons of metal objects recovered illegally by two fishermen from a shipwreck off the coast of Ca Mau province. Two experts dated 33,978 artefacts, mainly ceramics, to the Yongzheng reign of the Qing dynasty (1723-1735). Afterward, the recoveries, coded CMI, were handed over to the Binh Thuan Museum. (Amsterdam 2007, p.11)

 

In total only 45 of these plain jarlets were sold. (Amsterdam 2007, lot 1021-1025)

 

Condition: Some firing tension hairlines, caused by the firing process, a short hairline, a chip and a large chip with a connected hairline all to the rim. 

 

Reference:

Amsterdam 2007, lot 1021-1025

 

Price: Sold.

 

More pictures >>

2012318
2012318

Famille Verte 1680-1725

 

Object 2012318

 

Teapot

 

China

 

c.1700

 

Height with cover 90 mm (3.54 inch), height without cover 70 mm (2.76 inch), diameter handle to spout 167 mm (6.57 inch), diameter of mouthrim 52 mm (2.05 inch), diameter of footring 51 mm (2.00 inch), weight including cover 341 grams (12.02 ounce (oz.)), weight cover 24 grams (0.85 ounce (oz.))

 

Globular ribbed teapot on a footring. Straight spout and a curved C-shaped handle. The inlaying flat cover with round knob. Decorated in famille verte enamels with on each side flowering plants and a large phoenix in flight. Around the mouth a broad border with four cartouches, each filled with flower sprays, on a green-speckled ground with half rosettes. The handle and spout are decorated with stylized cloud motifs. On the cover four lozenges alternating with asterixis within a zig-zag-pattern border. On the knob a single flower head. The cover has been pierced. 

 

Although drinking Chinese tea had become a widespread habit all over Europe, it was still a beverage of the upper classes in the early 18th century. The better qualities especially were real luxuries and therefore expensive. During a tea party several types and qualities of tea were offered. Usually they were served in small cups and each guest had his or her own relatively small teapot with the chosen type of tea. In tea shops, too, small or miniature teacups and teapots were used to enable buyers to taste various kinds of tea and make their choice. (Jörg & Van Campen 1997, pp.199-200)

 

Condition: Some firing tension hairlines around the spout and to the attachments of the handle to body all caused by the firing process. A chip to the inlaying mouthrim. The cover has been broken.  

 

Reference:

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, p.112

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2012317
2012317

Polychrome wares other since 1722

 

Object 2012317

 

Bowl

 

China

 

1725-1730

 

Height 80 mm (3.15 inch), diameter of rim 157 mm (6.18 inch), diameter of footring 62 mm (2.44 inch), weight 349 grams (12.41 ounce (oz.))

 

Bowl on footring, straight rim. Decorated in iron-red and gold with a group of flowering peony and other flowering plants with a large chrysanthemum flower head and a group of flowering lotus plants with other plants both groups are divided by a butterfly in flight. On the bottom various flowering plants in a single concentric band. Round the footring an broad band in gold.

 

The porcelain on this bowl is pure, thin and translucent. It is refined and delicately painted by the Chinese porcelain painter with much attention to detail. This bowl may be regarded as a good example of the high quality porcelain that was made during the Yongzheng period (1723-1735).

 

Condition: Slight wear to the decoration.

 

Price: € 1.750 - $ 2.073 - £ 1.604

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2012288
2012288

Chinese Imari 1700-1800

 

Object 2012288

 

Dish

 

China

 

1700-1720

 

Height 31 mm (1.22 inch), diameter of rim 185 mm (7.28 inch), diameter of footring 92 mm (3.62 inch), weight 317 grams (11.18 ounce (oz.))

 

Sixteen-lobed dish footring. Curved moulded sides with petalled rim. Chinese Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, overglaze iron-red, green, yellow, black enamel and gold with two curving flowering prunus sprays shaped to fit the central petalled circle. The sides are divided into panels, three petals wide alternating with five petals wide. The three petals wide have two with a diaper pattern in gold on an underglaze blue ground and one is filled with a flowering prunus. The five petals wide are filled with flowering chrysanthemum sprays. Three stylised white chrysanthemum flower heads outlined in red with gold centres are scattered across the three petals wide panels. On the reverse rim two plum and two peony sprays and a double underglaze blue circle round the outer footring. 

 

The pattern on this  dish was painted after a Japanese Imari original. The pattern was also copied in china and in many European porcelain factories, including Chelsea, Derby and Worcester.

 

For Japanese dishes decorated with a comparable pattern, please see;

For a Chelsea copy of the pattern in the British Museum, please see:

Condition: Two firing flaws to the inner footring, some glaze rough spots and a hairline to the rim.

 

References:

Ayers, Impey & Mallet 1990, cat. 237, cat. 238 & cat. 345

Suchomel 1997, cat. 108

Impey 2002, cat. 300

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2012291
2012291

Japanese Blue and White wares 18th Century

 

Object 2012291

 

Dish

 

Japan (probably Nangawara area)

 

2nd half 18th century 

 

Height 23 mm (0.91 inch), diameter of rim 167 mm (6.57 inch), diameter of footring 110 mm (4.33 inch), weight 181 grams (9.38 ounce (oz.))

 

Lobed dish on footring, straight rim, brown edge. On the base four spur-marks in a Y-pattern. Decorated with a flowering prunus trees in low relief and ancient (xiǎozhuàn (小篆)) Chinese characters on a underglaze blue cloud motif. On the base two concentric circles and a fuku (good luck) mark within a double-lined square in seal script.

 

The ancient (xiǎozhuàn (小篆)) Chinese characters on this dish form an old Chinese poem. The writing is Japanese with the characters adopted from Chinese writing. The first seven characters form a very good verse of a poem, the meaning and the structure follow the requirements of a poem. There is however no existing poem that it can relate to. It is therefore highly possible that there one/some written in Japan and this dish quoted from them. The last three characters make no sense, when they are put together with the first seven characters it no longer makes sense in the Chinese poetry style.

 

The meaning of the characters:

 

(from right to left on the plate) 千尺瀑布x雲間, 看白櫻


1. 千, One thousand. Just to emphasize it being long.
2. 尺, A Chinese measuring unit. (pronounced as Chi, similar to 1 foot),
One metric meter has 3 Chi. During the Han period, it was about a quarter of
a meter.
3. 瀑. This combines with the 4th word, meaning waterfall.
4. 布. See above
5. 崖Cliff
6. 雲 Cloud.
7. 間 Among something, i.e. the cloud. In my words: When one is standing at
the bottom of the waterfall and look upward, the tall waterfall flows down
as if the mist is among the clouds.
8. 看 Look, (admiring, appreciating).
9. 白 White
10. 櫻, Cherry blossom.

(I am indebted to mr. Simon Fan, Australia for this information)

 

These dishes decorated with these archaic Chinese poems were probably made for the domestic market during the second half of the 18th century in the kilns of the Nangawara area.

 

Condition: A frit to the rim.

  

Price: Sold.

 

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2012293
2012293

Kraak Porcelain wares 1570-1645

 

Object 2012293

 

Dish

 

China

 

1620-1640

 

Height 36 mm (1.42 inch), diameter of rim 213 mm (8.39 inch), diameter of footring 114 mm (4.49 inch), weight 233 grams (8.22 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on footring, slightly scalloped flat rim. Decorated in underglaze blue with a geometric squares pattern each square includes a flower head painted in reverse encircled by an eight pointed scalloped medallion. On the sides and rim large panels filled with peach and auspicious symbols alternating with narrow panels with a diaper pattern and dots. On the reverse broad panels filled rounded shapes and narrow panels with hastily-drawn lingzhi.

 

According to Rinaldi this dish can be classified as a Border VII.3 dish. Borders in this group show a great variety in their decorative motifs. The most common bears the sunflower motif alternating with large and simply drawn symbols. Dishes with similar border were found among the shards from the São Gonçalo. The seven broad panels filled rounded shapes on the reverse of this specific dish are unusual because most dishes of the border VII 3. type have no more than four to six circles / rounded shapes on the reverse. (Rinaldi 1989, pp.106-108)

 

For similarly dishes decorated with geometrical patterns, please see;

Condition: Some firing flaws and chips to the rim and inner footring.

 

References:

Rinaldi 1989, Pl. 97

Sjostrand & Lok Lok 2007, Serial No. 2623, 2628, 7951, 7957

  

Price: Sold.

 

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2012301
2012301

Famille Verte 1680-1725

 

Object 2012301

 

Dish

 

China

 

c.1700 

 

Height 33 mm (1.30 inch), diameter of rim 197 mm (7.76 inch), diameter of footring 98 mm (3.86 inch), weight 305 grams (10.76 ounce (oz.))

 

Lobed dish on a footring, with spreading sides, and a lobed rim. Decorated in powder blue, underglaze blue and famille verte enamels with foaming waves and four shells, a halved sun or moon amidst clouds overhead. The eight panels on the sides show, alternately, some of the 'hundred antiquities' in enamels, lotuses reserved on a red ground, flowering plants with a bird perched on a branch in underglaze blue, and a pavilion with a pine tree in gold on a powder blue ground. On the reserve five underglaze blue flower sprays, a double circle on the base.

 

This dish showcases the virtuosity of the porcelain producer, who used various decorative techniques in different media for which three kiln firings were needed. (Jörg 2011/2, p. 58, cat. 57)

 

For an identically shaped, sized and decorated dish, please see:

Condition: Some fleabites and frits to the rim.

 

Reference: 

Jörg 2011/2, cat. 57

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2012298 & 2012299
2012298 & 2012299

The Hatcher Junk (1643-1646) 

 

Objects 2012298 & 2012299

 

Two winecups

 

China

 

c.1643

  

Provenance: The Hatcher Collection, Christie’s Amsterdam, 12 and 13 June 1984.

 

Object 2012298 (with the original orange/red Christie's Amsterdam circular paper auction label which reads: Hatcher Collection Christie's June '84): Height 38 mm (1.50 inch), diameter of rim 62 mm (2.45 inch), diameter of footring 22 mm (0.87 inch), weight 28 grams (0.99 ounce (oz.))

 

Object 2012298: Height 37 mm (1.46 inch), diameter of rim 60 mm (2.36 inch), diameter of footring 21 mm (0.82 inch), weight 26 grams (0.92 ounce (oz.))

 

Two winecups on footring of conical shape with a slightly flaring rim. Decorated in underglaze blue one with a double line border around the foot and a single line around the rim, the other with a single line around the foot and a single line around the rim. Marked on the base with the six-character mark: Da Ming Cheng hua nian zao, (Made during the Chenghua reign of the Great Ming Dynasty (AD1465-1487)), in a single circle, underglaze blue. On the bottom of one winecup the original orange/red Christie's Amsterdam circular paper auction label which reads: Hatcher Collection Christie's June '84.

 

The Hatcher Junk

 

1643-1646

 

The Hatcher Cargo was recovered from the wreck of a Chinese junk in the South China seas port of Batavia (today Jakarta) by Captain Michael Hatcher in 1983, and was later sold in the Netherlands. They were a small part of what, at the time, was the largest cargo of Chinese porcelain ever recovered in good condition from the sea. Captain Michael Hatcher and his crew brought up about 25,000 pieces of unbroken porcelain from the Hatcher junk those sold through four sales at Christies Amsterdam. The very wide diversity and quality of many of the pieces created great interest, and the date was established by the existence in the find of two pieces with the Chinese cyclical date for 1643.

 

Captain Michael Hatcher and his crew brought up about 25,000 pieces of unbroken porcelain from the Hatcher junk. Those sold through four sales at Christies Amsterdam. Captain Hatcher returned to the site in 1985 and salvaged over 2,000 more pieces, most of which were sold through a London dealer, Heirloom and Howard. The great majority of the 25,000 pieces were Jingdezhen blue and white, but there were also interesting groups of celadon, blanc-de-Chine, coloured wares and provincial blue-and-white. (Sheaf & Kilburn 1988, pp.8-19)

 

The ship was almost certainly sailing from China to the Dutch base at Batavia from where cargoes were purchased and transhipped to Dutch East Indiamen for their journey to Europe.

 

The range of shapes of wares available in the Hatcher junk illustrates what a south Asian porcelain trading vessel of the mid-17th Century might be expected to contain. The cargo also includes objects which normally did not reach the West. This wreck should be seen in its historical context. There was a Dutch pewter jug found in the wreck, which certainly suggests a connection with the Dutch East India Company, (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie, VOC), headquarters at Batavia. The native Ming dynasty was overthrown in 1644 and the resulting civil war substantially upset Chinese trade with the VOC and other western powers. The rebellion interrupted Junk trade to the VOC headquarters at Formosa, the entrepot for ceramics bound ultimately for Batavia. The contents of this wreck suggest a considerable conservatism in the production of Chinese domestic blue-and-white for the first half of the 17th Century. Types of kraak porcelain which were discovered in the Witte Leeuw wreck (which sank in 1613) are closely mirrored in the porcelain of this ship, 30 to 40 years later, it is often said that the Dutch were very conservative in their porcelain taste during the first half the 17th century. It may well be that the VOC went on buying kraak type wares, and the reason why such large amounts of dishes, bowls and jars survived especially in the Netherlands, is that, in fact, there was no export porcelain alternative readily available which the VOC could buy in quantity from Chinese trading Junks. Many of the smaller pieces offered from this wreck bear earlier reign-marks, mostly of the late Ming Emperors none unfortunately of Tianqi or Chongzheng, but equally none with Kangxi marks or cyclical dates for the earliest years of the Manchu Qing dynasty. (Amsterdam 1985, pp.7-8)

 

There were 7,800 cups in a very wide range of shapes and decorations on the Hatcher junk, but no kraak ones. The fashion for drinking tea and coffee had recently spread from the Middle East to Europe, and cups in new styles were in great demand. However, we cannot assume from their absence on the Hatcher junk that they were no longer made, and it may equally well be that the demand for them continued to match the kraak dishes, bowls and flasks on European dinner tables. (Sheaf & Kilburn 1988, p.39)

 

About twenty similarly shaped winecups were salvaged from the wreck of the East Indiaman Witte Leeuw which sank in 1613. The discovery of such fine wares having been made for export before 1612 was rather surprising. It has always been believed that such porcelain belonged either to Imperial ware, of which only pieces trickled to Europe during that time, or that they dated from a later period. Proof that this type of ware had come to Europe at the beginning of the 17th century comes from Ms Gordon Lee of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. In the J.G. Johnson collection there is a still life painting by Christoffel van den Berghe (working in Middelburg from 1617-1642), dated 1617 on which two winecups are painted which are exactly the same as those from the Witte Leeuw. A second historical source was found in the inventory of the Art Cabinet of Gustavus Adolf of Sweden which was put together before 1634. In it, there are three winecups of the same type as those from the Witte Leeuw. Furthermore, at excavations at the James River Basin in Virginia, Dr. Julia B. Curtis saw that several sherds excavated from various tenant settlements near Jamestown are of the same type as the wine ups from the Witte Leeuw. The settlements date from 1618-1650. The East Indiaman the Banda, sunk at Mauritius in 1615 (two years after the Witte Leeuw) had on board a private cargo of Chinese porcelain. Among the wares a large quantity of these winecups was found. (Pijl-Ketel 1982)

 

 

 

Christoffel van den Berghe, Dutch (active Middelburg), active c.1617 - after 1628 Philadelphia Museum of Art, (source: www.philamuseum.org) The painting is not included in this 2011773 offer.

 

The shape is typical Chinese and resembles the well-known winecup or in Japan, sake cup. On VOC lists with porcelain, the name 'pimpelkens' occurs frequently. A 'pimpelken'  could be a small cup or glass from which brandewijn (a kind of brandy) was drunk. On ships, they were also used as a measure for rations (for instance fruit juice against scurvy). The name 'pimpelkens' therefore probably refers to such types of winecups. (Pijl-Ketel 1982)

  

In total 2,184 winecups were sold by Christie's Amsterdam on 12 and 13 June 1984 divided over the lots: 71-96, 379-420B and 500-509. (Amsterdam 1984/2)

 

For identically winecups, please see:

For similarly shaped winecups, please see:

Condition:

2012298: Perfect.

2012299: Perfect.

 

References:

Pijl-Ketel 1982, pp. 143-144 & inv.no: NG 1977-34W & NG 1977-128W

Sheaf & Kilburn 1988, pp. 32-37

Amsterdam 1984/2, lot 71-96. lot 379-420B & lot 500-509

Davison 1994, cat. 1335

www.philamuseum.org

 

Price: € 499 - $ 590 - £ 453

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

More pictures >>

2012295
2012295

Polychrome wares other since 1722

  

Object 2012295

 

Teacup and saucer

 

China

 

1730-1735

 

Height of teacup 33 mm (1.30 inch), diameter of rim 55 mm (2.17 inch), diameter of footring 22 mm (0.87 inch), weight 26 grams (0.92 ounce (oz.))

Height of saucer 20 mm (0.79 inch), diameter of rim 98 mm (3.86 inch), diameter of footring 54 mm (2.13 inch), weight 43 grams (1.51 ounce (oz.))

 

Small teacup and saucer on footring, spreading sides and everted rims. Polychrome decorated in iron-red, black and gold with two butterflies facing each other on the sides three flower sprays. The reverse is undecorated. The teacup is decorated en suite.

 

The butterfly is the symbol of joy, marital bliss, summer and happiness and a favourite subject in poems and paintings. Sometimes it is called the 'Chinese Cupid' after a story about a young student. When he was chasing a butterfly he entered a garden where he met the beautiful daughter of a retired magistrate. He was so taken with her charms that he decided to work hard at his studies and to become a success so that he could ask for her hand in marriage. The butterfly dancing among blossom chalices may symbolize the man who refreshes himself with the love of a woman. (Hartog 1990, p.149 & p.151)

 

Condition:

Teacup: A fleabite and a frit to the rim.

Saucer: Some wear to the decoration.

 

Reference:

Hartog 1990, p.149 & p.151

 

Price: € 199 - $ 234 - £ 180

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2012296
2012296

Batavia Brown (Capucin wares) 1700-1800 - Tea, Coffee and Chocolate wares

 

Object 2012296

 

Teapot

 

China

 

1730-1750

 

Height 131 mm (5.16 inch), diameter handle to spout 175 mm (6.89 inch), diameter of footring 55 mm (2.17 inch), weight with cover 416 grams (14.67 ounce (oz.)), weight cover 84 grams (2.96 ounce (oz.))

 

Teapot of globular shape on footring, straight spout with a curved C-shaped handle. Domed cover and a pointed knob. Batavia Brown covered with underglaze dark brown. Decorated in underglaze blue. On the body two fan-shaped reserves containing a bird perched upon a flowering branch and two small reserves filled with a single flower spray. The cover is similarly decorated en suite.

 

In the Netherlands, porcelain decorated in this type of underglaze brown has historically been called "Batavia Brown" or "Capucijnergoed" ("Chick-pea ware", after the legume). The first name may have been coined because most goods exported to The Netherlands from the East were sent via Batavia and has nothing to do with a Batavian production or decoration, It is a very common type with the decoration usually contained within medallions. Occasionally, a gold decoration has been painted on the brown glaze. The brown colour is achieved by using iron oxide as a pigment, which like underglaze blue, needs to be fired at high temperatures. Considerable quantities were exported to the Western and Inter-Asian markets from c.1700. The pieces are rarely refined and can be considered as articles for everyday use by the middle-classes. (Jörg 2002/2, p.120

  

Condition: Perfect.

 

Reference:

Jörg 2002/2, p.120

 

Price: € 499 - $ 589 - £ 448

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2012294
2012294

Kakiemon / Kakiemon-style wares - Kakiemon

 

Object 2012294

 

Saucer

 

Japan

 

c.1680

 

Height 18 mm (0.71 inch), diameter of rim 115 mm (4.53 inch), diameter of footring 68 mm or (2.67 inch), weight 81 grams (2.86 ounce (oz.)) 

 

Saucer on footring. The spreading rim slightly foliated. On the base a single spur-mark. Kakiemon decorated in underglaze blue and enamels with a flowerpot (kabon) on a low table filled with a flowering peony plant. On the sides four panels filled with peony sprays growing from rockwork. The panels are divided by basket work. The reverse is undecorated.

 

Kakiemon with underglaze blue.

 

A major product of the Kakiemon kiln was blue-and-white with spaces for an unspecific enamelled pattern. Sherds of both pieces with a border decoration in underglaze blue with an empty well and with pieces with a well decoration but with a wide rim decorated only with blue-and-white rockwork that does not demand a specific pattern have been found at the Kakiemon kiln-site. Few pieces have been found that demand a specific decoration in enamel. These pieces are never on the nigoshide body, which never bears underglaze blue. (Impey 2002, p.124)

 

According to Impey in his book Japanese export porcelain, the panelling in red is unusual in Kakiemon but is paralled in the very large bowl at the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen in Dresden. (Impey 2002, p.134, cat. 183)

 

The flowerpot (kabon) motif was used on the first Japanese export porcelain in the mid-17th century and comes from Chinese Kraak porcelain. It also occurs on Kakiemon-style pieces, often in combination with a kraak-style border divided into sections. (Fitski 2011, p.149

 

For an identically Kakiemon decorated teacup in the collection of the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford, please see:

 For the very large bowl at Staatliche Kunstsammlungen in Dresden, please see:

Condition: Enamel loss to the central decoration and a frit to the rim.

 

References:

Reichel 1981, pl.23

Impey 2002, p.124, p.134 & cat. 183

Fitski 2011, p.149 & cat. 33 

  

Price: Sold.

 

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2012292
2012292

Shipwreck Porcelains - The Nanking Cargo, 1752

 

Object 2012292

 

Bowl

 

China

 

1752

 

Provenance: The Nanking Cargo sale, Christie's Amsterdam, 28 April - 2 May 1986

 

Height 72 mm (2.83 inch), diameter of rim 148 mm (5.83 inch), diameter of footring 60 mm (2.36 inch), weight 347 grams (12.24 ounce (oz.))

 

Bowl on footring, straight rim. Chinese Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, iron-red and gold with a scholar crossing a bridge connecting rocky islets with retreats and pine in a river landscape. Round the inner rim a trellis-pattern border in iron-red. On the base the original deteriorated circular paper Christie's The Nanking Cargo sale lot 318? label proving it has been one of 1,365 bowls sold divided over the lots 3168-3188. (Amsterdam 1986, p. 131)

 

On Monday January 3, 1752, the Dutch East India Company, (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie, VOC) ship Geldermalsen, struck a reef on her return journey to the Netherlands and sank in the South China Sea. Of the crew 32 survived and 80 went down with the ship and her cargo of tea, raw silk, textiles, dried wares, groceries, lacquer and porcelain. 

 

The cargo of Chinese porcelain was originally potted in Jingdezhen, Jiangzi province then shipped to Nanking for delivery to the VOC vessel Geldermalsen for final transportation to the Netherlands. The Geldermalsen struck a reef on her return journey to the Netherlands and sank in the South China Sea on January 3, 1752. The cargo was recovered by Captain Michael Hatcher and his team in 1985 and sold by Christie's Amsterdam on 28 April - 2 May 1985 as 'The Nanking Cargo. Chinese Export Porcelain and Gold' two hundred and thirty-five years later. (Jörg 1986/1. pp.39-59).

 

An interesting detail is that Captain Michael Hatcher found the wreck of the Geldermalsen on the same reef as he earlier, in 1983, found the wreck of a Chinese junk. both wrecks were about a mile apart. This Chinese Junk wreck came to be known as "The Hatcher Junk" she had a cargo of Kraak and Transitional porcelain objects that were dated c.1643. (Sheaf & Kilburn 1988, p.27)

 

The design on this bowl is known as the 'Scholar on Bridge' pattern in blue and enamels, small size. In total 1,365 bowls with the 'Scholar on bridge' pattern in blue and enamels, small size, were sold divided over the lots: 3168--3188. (Amsterdam 1986)

 

Condition: Two hairlines and three very tiny fleabites and a frit all the rim. On the Christie's The Nanking Cargo auction label only the three numbers 318? of four in total are still visible.

 

References:

Amsterdam 1986, lot 3168-3188

Jörg 1986/1, fig. 80

Sheaf & Kilburn 1988, Pl.188

 

Price: € 199 - $ 215 - £ 174

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2012276
2012276

Japanese Blue and White wares 17th Century

 

Object 2012276

 

Bowl

 

Japan

 

1680-1700

 

Height 70 mm (2.76 inch), diameter of rim 125 mm (4.92 inch), diameter of footring 44 mm (1.73 inch), weight 218 grams (7.69 ounce (oz.))

 

Bowl on footring, straight sides. Decorated in underglaze blue with dense leafy scrolls and three large peony flower heads. Round the footring a border with circles and asterisks. On the base pine, prunus and bamboo sprays in a double concentric band. Round the inner rim a continuous tree trunk meandering through clouds and mountains. Marked on the base with the Chinese general four-character mark 'Riches and honour equal to everlasting spring' [Wanli and Chongzhen]. (Davison 1994, cat. 1148)

 

The Three Friends of Winter (shôchikubai) are pine, Prunus mune and bamboo. Both pine and bamboo remain green throughout the winter, while the early blossoms of the Prunus mune are harbingers of spring. In China, the combination of the positive characteristics attributed to each motif represented the ideal character of the Confucian scholar. They became a subject in Japanese painting in the 15th century, and are also found on Kakiemon porcelain. (Fitski 2011, p.154)

 
The dense leafy scrolls and three large peony flower heads design on this bowl is very similar to that found on the earlier sold six teacups and saucers (objects 2011624A/F). These six teacups and saucers date from a period in which export porcelain tea sets, comprising of teacups and saucers, tea caddies, milk jugs, sugar and slop bowl, were not yet available. This type of bowl could very well have served as a slop bowl (used to rinse the teacups) during that time. 

 

Condition: Perfect.

 

References:

Davison 1994, cat. 1148

Fitski 2011, p.154

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2010680
2010680

Polychrome wares other since 1722

 

Object 2010680

 

Teacup and saucer

 

China

 

1740-1750

 

Height of teacup 38 mm (1.50 inch), diameter of rim 73 mm (2.87 inch), diameter of footring 37 mm (1.46 inch), weight 40 grams (1.41 ounce (oz.))

Height of saucer 21 mm (0.83 inch), diameter of rim 115 mm (4.53 inch), diameter of footring 66 mm (2.60 inch), weight 53 grams (1.87 ounce (oz.))

 

Teacup and saucer on footrings, slightly everted rims. Polychrome decorated in bianco sopra bianco with

a Chinese landscape with two pavilions among rocks and bushes. A huntsman in a pink coat and black hat and leggings carrying a stave runs after his black hound which is chasing a leaping stag. In the foreground two huntsmen in pink and blue oriental robes, each carrying a stave, are engaged in conversation. Round the rim is a bianco sopra bianco border,. The reverse is undecorated. The teacup is decorated en suiteOn the base of the teacup an old oval paper collectors label that reads: "525 Lo Litratse".

 

There are two patterns found on English and Chinese porcelain that can be dated to the early 1750s. One is with grisaille vine leaves and pink grapes the other is with the staghunt; a popular English chinoiserie pattern dating to the early 1750s and possibly to the late 1740s. it is frequently seen on Chinese porcelain painted in England and also on a small number of pieces thought to have been decorated in China in the late 1740-50s. The pattern was used widely by English factories: in famille rose enamels on Worcester 'scratch cross' (1753-56), on Gilbody (1754-58) and Chaffers (1758-62) of Liverpool, also on Derby (1758) and Lowestoft porcelain (1765-70). Worcester cups were decorated with the pattern in London in 1765-70, and Chamberlain reintroduced it at Worcester c.1792 called the 'Hunting pattern in compartments'. The scene is set in a Chinese landscape with two pavilions among rocks and bushes. A huntsman in a pink coat and black hat and leggings carrying a stave runs after his black hound which is chasing a leaping stag. In the foreground two huntsmen in pink and blue oriental robes, each carrying a stave, are engaged in conversation. Round the rim is a gilt spearhead border, A feature found on both Chinese and English porcelain examples is white enamel scrollwork and flowerheads surrounding the scene. This is known as bianco sopra bianco, a term applied to opaque white enamel decoration on tin glazed earthenware in Europe and copied in China on export porcelain as rim decoration, as a filler between panels or as all over decoration. Less subtle than anhua  'hidden' decoration, its success was short lived and was fashionable only from the 1730s until about 1750. Jill McNeile has studies the staghunt pattern and learned to distinguish between Chinese and English bianco sopra bianco scroll work. She has observed that many of the Chinese porcelain pieces decorated with the staghunt in England have Chinese bianco sopra bianco scrollwork either overall so that the English enamels are on top of the white enamel, or filling the spaces between the panels containing the English staghunt scenes, occasionally augmented by English bianco sopra bianco. These apparently have been exported with blank panels. Plain white porcelain decorated with white enamel would have been seen as very dull and probably unsaleable in England so it is not surprising that they were invariably over-decorated. Other variations seen are in the gilt border which is often in ruyi form, in the colour of the rocks which can be a combination of yellow and dark pink or maroon instead of black, and in the colour of the orchid-like flower inside some cups; Chinese painted flowers thought to be gold and English pink. Although there are many different versions of the staghunt on Chinese porcelain, as some closely resemble English factory decoration it is difficult not to conclude that both Chinese and English porcelain were often decorated by the same enamellers. (Espir 2005, pp.227-229)

 

The painting on this set is done in a fine and delicate way with soft enamel colours. When comparing this set to the English over-decorated set published in Helen Espir's book European Decoration on Oriental Porcelain 1700-1830, (H. Espir, Jorge Welsh Books, London, UK, 2005), p.228, cat. 30, one can only conclude that this set is probably one of the sets that Espir mentioned as being 'a small number of pieces thought to have been decorated in China in the late 1740s-50s'.

 

Bianco sopra bianco, (Italian: white on white), is a decorative technique of white enamel over white or undecorated glazed porcelain, usually to create a lace-like effect. It was common around 1740-1750. (Kroes 2007, p.653)

 

For a Chinese teacup and saucer, over-decorated in England with the stag-hunt design, please see:

For other objects overdecorated with the stag-hunt design, please see:

Condition:

Teacup: Some tiny fleabites and two frits to the rim

Saucer: Some tiny fleabites and two frits one with a short connected hairline to the rim.

 

References:

Jörg 1995, cat. 32

Espir 2005, pp.227-229 & cat. 30

Kroes 2007, p.653

Salisbury 2014, cat. 419

Emden 2015/1, cat. 127

Emden 2015/2, cat. 127

 

Price: € 349 - $ 415 - £ 311

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2012285
2012285

Blue and White Kangxi Period 1662-1722

 

Object 2012285

 

Rosewater sprinkler

 

China

 

c.1700

 

Height 184 mm (7.24 inch), diameter 80 mm (3.15 inch), diameter of mouthrim 5 mm (0.20 inch), diameter of footring 43 mm (1.69 inch), weight 256 grams (9.03 ounce (oz.))

 

Rosewater sprinkler on tall, spreading foot with deep recessed glazed base. A globular body with a long tapering neck. Decorated in underglaze blue with panels filled with flowering plants growing from taihu (garden) rocks. On the foot and neck groups of leaves alternating with four lozenges. Round the mouthrim a zig-zag lines pattern border.

 

The shape draws on Persian metalwork designs from the 16th and 17th centuries. Fragrant rosewater (gulaul) was used for refreshment, cleaning and scenting at both religious and secular events in the Islamic world. In Western settlements all over Asia they were widely-used as well. (Düsseldorf 2015, p.276

 

Rose water sprinklers, known as gulabpash, have been used in India since the Mughal period for the purpose of refreshing oneself by moistening one's face, washing hands after a meal or for sprinkling a visitor as a gesture of welcome. Dutch traders discovered them in India and subsequently ordered porcelain bottles in various designs to be made in China. These bottles were partly sold in the Ottoman Empire, where local silversmiths fashioned artistic stoppers for them. Today, rose water bottles are found in the Sultan's Collection in Istanbul as well as in some Dutch museums, for example the Princessehof in Leeuwarden or the Museum Boijmans van Beuningen. (Suebsman 2019, p.74)

 

Perfumation and thurification have a very long history and can be traced back to prehistoric times. For thurification various types of incense burners were and are used until this day. For perfumation, rose-water was used that was stored and applied in specially made sprinklers. (META-Museum: Chinese Export Silver for the Islamic World, (A. von Ferscht, www.chinese-export-silver.com))

 

Rosewater sprinklers were are known to be decorated in underglaze blue, in 'Red & Gold' or 'Rouge de Fer' , or the body was (partly) covered in powder blue, Batavia brown or some other monochrme colour. At first they were only exported and used as such in Batavia later on in the West they were often fitted with metal or silver mounts. In the Netherlands they served as curiosities and decorative items. (Jörg & Van Campen 1997, p136)

 

Condition: Some flaked of pieces of glaze on the bulge, some caused by popped bubbles of glaze during the firing process.

 

References:

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, cat. 140

Düsseldorf 2015, p.276

Suebsman 2019, p.74

www.chinese-export-silver.com

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2012168
2012168

Japanese Blue and White wares 17th Century

 

Object 2012168

 

Ewer / jug

 

Japan

 

c.1670-1690

 

Height 283 mm (11.14 inch), diameter 162 mm (8.38 inch), diameter of mouthrim 63 mm (2.48 inch) x 70 mm (2.76 inch), diameter of footring 94 mm (3.70 inch), weight 1,524 grams (53.76 ounce (oz.))

 

Oviform ewer / jug on footring, cylindrical neck, cup-shaped mouth with pinched spout. Curved pierced handle. Decorated in underglaze blue with three shaped panels reserved on a ground of karakusa scrolls. In each panel and on the neck a flowering peony. Round the mouth a ruyi-border. The handle with a karakusa scroll.

 

This is a common type in the export assortment. Two sizes are known 220 mm (8.66 inch) and 280 mm (11.02 inch) high. The division into panels on a karakusa ground is distinctively Japanese and also occurs on other types of ewers, mugs, bottles and vases. (Jörg 2003/1, p.161)

  

The shape of this ewer / jug derived from a European stoneware model. The piercing on the handles of this and similar shapes is original, and was intended for the silver or other metal mount that would customarily have been added in Europe. (Impey 2002 )

 

These tall long-necked jugs with landscapes in three panels separated by Mohammedan scrolls on their bodies, floral ornament on their neck and ju-i motifs, round their lips, are reminiscent of 16th- and 17th-century Ming Porcelain in decoration and probably date from 1674-1684. Some smaller jugs are similarly decorated with flowers, landscapes or figures in panels. (Lunsingh Scheurleer 1971

 

For identically shaped and decorated ewers, please see:

Condition: A firing tension hairline.

 

References:

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1971, p.75, cat. 71a, 71b & 72

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1980, p.379, cat. 394. p.444, cat. 518 & p.445, cat 521

Daendels 1981, p.67, cat. 94

Impey 2002, p.54, cat. 32

Jörg 2003/1, p.161, cat. 182

Kyushu 2003, cat. 1541 & 1817

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2012275
2012275

Japanese Tea, Coffee and Chocolate wares 18th Century

 

Object 2012275

 

Teacup

 

Japan

 

Early 18th century

 

Height 48 mm (1.89 inch), diameter of rim 72 mm (2.83 inch), diameter of footring 32 mm (1.26 inch), weight 52 grams (1.83 ounce (oz.))

 

Teacup footring, curved sides with petalled rims. Polychrome decorated in iron-red, gold and other overglaze enamels with a single stylised chrysanthemum flower encircled by a floral border in gold on an iron-red ground alternating with panels filled with flowering plants. On the inner wall scattered flower heads.

 

The design is also known on Chinese export porcelains of around c.1710-25 and on Worcester wares of around 1770.

 

For an identically decorated Japanese saucer, please see:

For similarly decorated Chinese objects, please see:

Condition: A frit with a connected V-shaped hairline to the rim.

 

References:

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1982/2, cat. 145

Goddio & Guyot de Saint Micheal 1999, cat. 125 & 126

Impey 2002, cat. 372

Jörg 2011/2, cat. 159

Emden 2015/1, cat. 33

Emden 2015/2, cat. 33

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2012274
2012274

Polychrome wares other since 1722

 

Object 2012274

 

Teacup and saucer

 

China

 

1710-1725

 

Height of teacup 40 mm (1.57 inch), diameter of rim 69 mm (2.71 inch), diameter of footring 21 mm (0.82 inch), weight 47 grams (1.65 ounce (oz.))

Height of saucer 24 mm (0.94 inch), diameter of rim 108 mm (4.25 inch), diameter of footring 58 mm (2.28 inch), weight 65 grams (2.29 ounce (oz.))

 

Teacup and saucer on footrings, curved sides with petalled rims. Polychrome decorated in iron-red, gold and other overglaze enamels with a single stylised chrysanthemum flower encircled by a floral border in gold on an iron-red ground. On the sides eight panels of two or three petals wide. The smaller panels have an orange ground with gold diaper and central chrysanthemum flower repeated in the centre, the others have flowering prunus and chrysanthemum. The reverse is undecorated. Marked on the base with the symbol mark: Artemisia leaf, in a double circle, underglaze blue. The teacup is decorated en suite.

 

The decorating design used on this Chinese teacup and saucer clearly derived from Japanese Imari saucers. The design is also known on Worcester wares of around 1770.

 

For identically decorated objects, please see:

For an identically decorated Japanese saucer, please see:

Condition:

Teacup: A chip to the inner footring.

Saucer: A chip to the reverse rim.

 

References:

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1982/2, cat. 145

Goddio & Guyot de Saint Micheal 1999, cat. 125 & 126

Impey 2002, cat. 372

Jörg 2011/2, cat. 159

Emden 2015/1, cat. 33

Emden 2015/2, cat. 33

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2010796
2010796

Japanese Tea, Coffee and Chocolate wares 18th Century

 

Object 2010796

 

Teapot

  

Japan

 

1700-1720

 

Height 86 mm (3.39 inch), diameter handle to spout 137 mm (5.39 inch), diameter of mouthrim 48 mm (1.89 inch), diameter of footring 48 mm (1.89 inch), weight with cover 214 grams (7.55 ounce (oz.)), weight cover 36 grams (1.27 ounce (oz.))

 

Teapot on footring, curved handle, straight spout. Flat cover with round knob. Imari decorated in underglaze blue, iron-red and gold with on each side groups of various flowering plants. On the handle and spout florets between scrolls. The cover is decorated en suite.

 

Condition: A restored spots to the tip of the spout and the underside of the handle.

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2012280
2012280

Shipwreck Porcelains - The Nanking Cargo, 1752

 

Object 2012280

 

Bowl

 

China

 

1752

 

Provenance: The Nanking Cargo sale, Christie's Amsterdam, 28 April - 2 May 1986

  

Height 73 mm (2.87 inch), diameter of rim 150 mm (5.91 inch), diameter of footring 56 mm (2.20 inch), weight 320 grams (11.29 ounce (oz.))

 

Bowl on footring, straight underglaze brown-edged rim (jia mangkou). Chinese Imari decorated in underglaze blue, and overglaze iron-red with the "Peony Rock" pattern. Painted with peony, chrysanthemum, bamboo and flowering peach issuing from a rocky terrace on the exterior and a camellia spray in the interior below a trellis-pattern border. On the bowl the original Christie's The Nanking Cargo sale label and the original Christie's lot 3154 label proving it has been one of 240 bowls sold in lot 3154.

 

On Monday January 3, 1752, the Dutch East India Company, (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie, VOC) ship Geldermalsen, struck a reef on her return journey to the Netherlands and sank in the South China Sea. Of the crew 32 survived and 80 went down with the ship and her cargo of tea, raw silk, textiles, dried wares, groceries, lacquer and porcelain. 

 

The cargo of Chinese porcelain was originally potted in Jingdezhen, Jiangzi province then shipped to Nanking for delivery to the VOC vessel Geldermalsen for final transportation to the Netherlands. The Geldermalsen struck a reef on her return journey to the Netherlands and sank in the South China Sea on January 3, 1752. The cargo was recovered by Captain Michael Hatcher and his team in 1985 and sold by Christie's Amsterdam on 28 April - 2 May 1985 as 'The Nanking Cargo. Chinese Export Porcelain and Gold' two hundred and thirty-five years later. (Jörg 1986/1. pp.39-59).

 

An interesting detail is that Captain Michael Hatcher found the wreck of the Geldermalsen on the same reef as he earlier, in 1983, found the wreck of a Chinese junk. both wrecks were about a mile apart. This Chinese Junk wreck came to be known as "The Hatcher Junk" she had a cargo of Kraak and Transitional porcelain objects that were dated c.1643. (Sheaf & Kilburn 1988, p.27)

 

Near all the gold and iron-red decoration have worn off. (Amsterdam 1986, p.128 

 

In total 2,779 bowls with the 'Peony Rock' landscape pattern, were sold divided over the lots: 3126-3157. (Amsterdam 1986)

 

Condition: A firing flaw to the footring.

 

References:

Amsterdam 1986, lot 3126-3157

Jörg 1986/1, fig. 82

Sheaf & Kilburn 1988, Pl. 189

Sargent 2012, p.183

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2012278
2012278

Japanese Blue and White wares 17th Century

 

Object 2012278

 

Cream dish

 

Japan, Arita presumably Sarugawa

 

1670-1690

 

Height 39 mm (1.53 inch), diameter of rim 172 mm (6.77 inch), diameter of footring 83 mm (3.27 inch), weight 253 grams (8.92 ounce (oz.))

 

Cream dish on footring with a straight rim and a glazed base. On the base four spur-marks in a Y-pattern. Decorated in underglaze blue in a Chinese kraak style with in the centre a decoration of two branches with fruit, one with pomegranates and one with finger-lemon fruit also called 'Buddha's-hand citron' (Citrus medica). On the sides and rim large panels filled with stylised peonies and precious objects alternating with narrower panels filled with florets. The reverse is undecorated.

 

The pomegranate and Buddha's Hand citron (Citrus medica) symbolically represent fertility and happiness, together with the peach (longevity) they are being named 'The three Abundances'. (Arts 1983, p.140)

 

Although the border division copies kraak porcelain, the decoration of the two large branches filling the centre seems to be based on Chinese prototypes of the later Transitional-early Kangxi period. The Japanese potter combined two styles to create a hybrid, fashionable Japanese novelty. Dishes and plates of this design which were apparently popular, were made in different sizes. (Jörg 2003/1, p.28

 

For identically decorated dishes please see;

Condition: A few fleabites to the footring.

 

References:

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1971, cat. 8

Woodward 1974, cat. 26(b)

Jenyns 1979, cat. 16a

Arts 1983, p.140

Hartog 1990, cat. 153

Suchomel 1997, cat. 25

Jörg 1999, cat. 27

Impey 2002, cat. 128

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 8

Kyushu 2003, cat. 2595

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2012277
2012277

Japanese Tea, Coffee and Chocolate wares 18th Century 

 

Objects 2012277

 

Saucer

 

Japan

 

1700-1720

 

Height 22 mm (0.86 inch), diameter of rim 107 mm (4.21 inch), diameter of footring 43 mm or (1.69 inch), weights 70 gram (2.47 ounce (oz.))

 

Saucer on footring, straight rim. Decorated in underglaze blue with a riverscape with a pagoda on a rocky riverbank, mountains, trees, fisherman in boats and an island appearing in the background. The reverse is undecorated.

 

The design on this saucer woith the overall decoration was probably copied from a Chinese saucer dating from the Kangxi period.

 

Teacups and saucers were especially developed for export, as Chinese and Japanese teacups did not have saucers. They were probably inspired by earlier Turkish and Islamic examples. VOC- records show that the Japanese made teacups and matching saucers from the very beginning of the export trade.

 

Jörg mentions that there are very few examples in Dutch collections of Arita tea wares in underglaze blue, they are quite rare. One of the reasons probably is that Japanese potters couldn’t compete with the much cheaper Chinese tea wares.

 

One of the best known examples of Japanese Arita tea ware are the teacups and saucers decorated with  the coat of arms of the Dutch family Huydecoper. Another equally rare set of teacups and saucers, with a more stylized decoration of scrolling vine with birds, is in the collection at the Japanese replica of Huis Ten Bosch, near Nagasaki, dated 1670-90. More interesting for comparison however are some tea cups found during excavations in Amsterdam, dated 1660-80, with an identical decoration. The later date of c.1700 of our set is mainly based on the clear inspiration by later Chinese Kangxi flower scrolls. (Arita 2000, p. 57 cat. 87), (Jörg 2003/1,pp. 191-192 &  p.231, cat. 293)

 

For Arita teacups and saucers decorated in underglaze blue with identical decoration, please see:

For other Arita teacups and saucers decorated in underglaze blue, please see:

Condition: Perfect.

 

References:

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1971, cat. 190

Arita 2000, p.57, cat. 87, p.122, cat. 252 & 253 & pp.212-213, cat. 16a/b   

Jörg 2003/1, p.191 & cat. 293

Emden 2015, Fig. 4

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2012273
2012273

Chinese wares over-decorated in the West 1700-1800 - Dutch over-decorated Amsterdams Bont wares

 

Object 2012273

 

Dish

China

1740-1750

 

Height 20 mm (0.79 inch), diameter of rim 165 mm (6.50 inch), diameter of footring 84 mm (3.31 inch), weight 188 grams (6.63 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on footring, flat underglaze brown-edged rim (jia mangkou). Decorated in 'Red & Gold' or 'Rouge de Fer' with iron-red, black enamel and gold on the glaze with an overall design of flowering peony in various stages of bloom. Over-decorated in iron-red, black and green overglaze enamel, in the Netherlands, Amsterdams Bont, c.1750-1770 with a basket filled with flowering plants, hanging ribbons and two insects in flight. Around the rim an ornamental border. The reverse is undecorated.

 

Not many originally decorated in 'Red & Gold' or 'Rouge de Fer' objects were used for over-decorating in the Netherlands, Amsterdams Bont, c.1750-1770. In the book 'Melk en Bloed. Exquisite porcelain from the Middle Kingdom', (D. Suebsman, Norden 2019), not a single object is mentioned.

 

For an identically in 'Red & Gold' or 'Rouge de Fer' decorated cream dish, please see:

Condition: One firing flaw to the inner footring and two firing flaws to the rim one with a fleabite. A hairline to the rim.

 

References:

Jörg 2002/2, cat. 80

Sargent 2012, p.183

 

Price: € 199 - $ 215 - £ 174

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2012271 & 2012272
2012271 & 2012272

Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - Dishes

 

Object 2012271 & 2012272

 

Two dishes

 

Japan

 

1700-1720

 

2012271: Height 41 mm (1.61 inch), diameter 255 mm (10.04 inch), diameter of footring 130 mm (5.12 inch), weight 671 grams (23.67 ounce (oz.))

2012272: Height 44 mm (1.73 inch), diameter 258 mm (10.16 inch), diameter of footring 130 mm (5.12 inch), weight 591 grams (20.85 ounce (oz.))

 

Two dishes on footrings, flat rims. On the bases three and four spur-marks. Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, iron-red and gold with a bamboo water conservation system beneath a flowering wisteria. The sides with three alternating wide and narrow shaped panels reserved on a blue ground filled with flowering chrysanthemum and peonies near a fence. The reverses with three chrysanthemum sprays.

 

For a larger identically decorated dish, please see;

At the end of the 18th century Dutch porcelain manufacturers Loosdrecht en Amstel Porcelain copied Oriental porcelain designs probably as replacements for broken objects from existing Chinese or Japanese services. Amstel porcelain copied this specific Japanese Imari design at the end of the 18th century. (Jörg 2003/1, p.105), (Jörg 1983, p.32)

 

For an identically decorated Amstel porcelain dish, please see;

For a similarly decorated, sold dish, please see;

The crackled glaze on object 2012272 is caused by the unequal contraction of the body and the glaze during cooling in the kiln after firing. (Jörg & Van Campen 1997, p.235)

 

Condition 2012271: Perfect. 

Condition 2012272: Two firing flaws and fine crazing to the glaze, caused by the firing process.

 

References:

Jörg 1983, p.32

Ayers, Impey & Mallet 1990, cat. 324

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, p.235

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 108 & Fig. 108b

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2012268
2012268

Chinese wares over-decorated in the West 1700-1800 - Dutch over-decorated Amsterdams Bont wares

 

Object 2012268

 

Bowl

 

China

1730-1750, over-decorated in the Netherlands, Amsterdams Bont, c.1750-1770

 

Height 73 mm (2.87 inch), diameter of rim 150 mm (5.91 inch), diameter of footring 59 mm (2.32 inch), weight 268 grams (9.45 ounce (oz.))

 

Bowl on footring with a straight underglaze brown-edged rim (jia mangkou). Carved anhua (secret) decoration of leafy branches. Decorated in underglaze blue with two diaper pattern borders one near the foorting the other round the rim. On the bottom a flower head in a single concentric band. Over-decorated in iron-red, black, gold and other overglaze enamels, in the Netherlands, Amsterdams Bont, c.1750-1770 with two figures in a landscape with trees, bushes, a pond and a house. One figure is sitting under a tree his elbow resting on his leg while his hand is supporting his head. The other figure is approaching while holding a stick, his scarf is being blown up by the wind.

 

The impression of the over-decoration on this bowl is clearly of famille verte. Very few examples copying famille verte porcelains are known suggesting that there was a plentiful supply of Chinese originals and that there was therefore no gap in the market for the European decorators to fill. As Dutch and English decorators copied so few famille verte pieces it is tempting to allocate all the European decorated pieces which have a predominantly green palette to the famille verte style even though they may hardly resemble the Chinese originals. (Espir 2005, pp.97-102

 

Anhua is a Chinese term meaning 'secret or hidden decoration', it is incised or carved into the body below the glaze. (Espir 2005, p.254

 

For a similarly Dutch over-decorated Amsterdams Bont covered bowl, formerly in the Helen Espir collection, please see:

Condition: Two hairlines to the rim.

 

References:

Sargent 2012, cat. 329

Salisbury 2014, cat. 372

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2012270
2012270

Japanese Imari 1690-1800

 

Object 2012270

 

Dish

 

Japan

 

1700-1720

 

Height 38 mm (1.49 inch), diameter 242 mm (9.53 inch), diameter of footring 127 mm (5.00 inch), weight 660 grams (23.28 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on footring, flat rim. On the base three spur-marks (one with the cone still intact and attached) in a V-pattern. Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, iron-red and gold with river scape with trees, mountains and clouds surrounded by a narrow border with florets between scrolls alternating with leafy scrolls in gold on an underglaze blue ground. The sides and rim with three shaped panels filled with a bird in flight alternating with three panels filled with a flower head surrounded by leafy scrolls on a underglaze blue ground with flower heads in iron-red and leafy scrolls in gold. On the reverse three prunus sprays.

 

Condition: Some firing flaws to the rim.

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2012251
2012251

Japanese Imari 1690-1800

 

Object 2012251

 

Covered bowl

 

Japan

 

1700-1720

  

Height with cover 95 mm (3.74 inch), height without cover 65 mm (2.56 inch), diameter 132 mm (5.20 inch), diameter of footring 64 mm (2.52 inch), weight with cover 418 grams (14.74 ounce (oz.)), weight cover 198 grams (6.98 ounce (oz.))

 

Covered bowl on footring. Straight sides, domed cover with strap handle. Imari, decorated with in underglaze blue, iron-red and gold. On the box three reserves filled with flowering chrysanthemum plants growing from banded hedges, three connected bamboo sticks and a butterfly in flight alternating with a flower head on an underglaze blue ground with foliate sprays in gold. On the outer footring two concentric bands in underglaze blue. The cover is decorated en suite. The strap handle decorated in gold and iron-red is flanked by two groups of half flower heads with leafy scrolls and is surrounded by a border with three groups of wide spread leaves.

 

Until around 1650, all porcelain imported to Europe comprised blue-and-whitewares. Inspired by Chinese porcelain, Japanese potters experimented with coloured enamels. The Dutch East India Company, (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie, VOC) focused on these new colourful wares as trade articles from the moment they were made. The decorations on this porcelain are frequently derived from Chinese examples. Imari decorations were among those that developed during this experimental phase.

Imari porcelain is named after the port Imari, from where porcelain was shipped to the Dutch Factory on Deshima Island in Nagasaki. Imari objects are usually decorated with exuberant and lively depictions. Besides underglaze blue, the other two dominant colours are iron-red and gold.

In 1680, Private traders replaced the Dutch East India Company, (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie, VOC) as the main trading partner in Japan. They focused on porcelain made in European shapes. The high point of this production occurred around 1700. Besides tableware, garnitures and ornamental dishes were produced, As with Chinese porcelain, enamelled objects and porcelain were very popular.

(source: Keramiek Museum Princessehof, Leeuwarden)

 

The shape, most likely, derived from a European (silver) model, it was used as a small tureen. Jörg describes a bowl with cover on three low feet with a matching saucer this may indicate that originally the covered box also might have had a matching saucer. (Jörg 2003/1, p.110, cat. 113)

 

For similarly shaped covered bowls, please see;

Condition: Two firing tension hairlines, caused during the firing process, to the base, two frits to the footring and a hairline with fleabite to the bowl.

 

References:

London 1997, cat. 95

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 116

Keramiek Museum Princessehof

 

Price: € 249 - $ 280 - £ 223

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2011976
2011976

Brown (Capucin wares) 1700-1800 - Tea, Coffee and Chocolate wares

 

Object 2011976

 

Teacup and saucer

 

China

 

1720-1750

 

Height of teacup 43 mm (1.69 inch), diameter of rim 82 mm (3.22 inch), diameter of footring 39 mm (1.54 inch), weight 70 grams (2.47 ounce (oz.))

Height of saucer 23 mm (0.91 inch), diameter of rim 135 mm (5.31 inch), diameter of footring 72 mm (2.83 inch), weight 111 grams (3.92 ounce (oz.))

 

Teacup and saucer on footrings, slightly everted rims. Batavia Brown covered with underglaze dark brown. 

Chinese Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, overglaze iron-red and gold with a central flower spray in a roundel surrounded by wave-shaped panels filled with a riverscape alternating with a flowering plant growing from rockwork. On the rim a zig zag lines-pattern border with reserves filled with flowerheads. The teacup is decorated en suite. On the base of the saucer an old rectangular paper collectors label with the handwritten number '185' in blue ink.

 

In the Netherlands, porcelain decorated in this type of underglaze brown has historically been called 'Batavia Brown' or Capucijnergoed ('Chick-pea ware', after the legume). The first name may have been coined because most goods exported to The Netherlands from the East were sent via Batavia and has nothing to do with a Batavian production or decoration, It is a very common type with the decoration usually contained within medallions. Occasionally, a gold decoration has been painted on the brown glaze. The brown color is achieved by using iron oxide as a pigment, which like underglaze blue, needs to be fired at high temperatures. Considerable quantities were exported to the Western and Inter-Asian markets from c.1700. The pieces are rarely refined and can be considered as articles for everyday use by the middle-classes. (Jörg 2002/2, p.120)

 

Batavia Brown is known in China as shanyu huang (eel yellow) or shan yu pi (eel-skin), that belongs to the family of tea-dust glazes (chayemo). (Sargent 2012, p. 533)

 

Condition:

Teacup: Perfect.

Saucer: A tiny fleabite to the rim and some fleabites to the footring.

 

References:

Jörg 2002/2, p.120

Sargent 2012, p.533

 

Price: Sold.

 

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