Pater Gratia Oriental Art

Recent Acquisitions

On this page you'll find my latest acquisitions, It may, however, take some time for all objects to load.

 

This way you can quickly browse through my recently acquired objects without having to browse through all the various categories.

 

After four weeks each object in 'Recent Acquisitions' will be moved to their specific category.

 

Latest updates:

 

Recent Acquisitions; March 1, 2021.

Bargain SALE Chinese Porcelain; February 22, 2021

Bargain SALE Japanese Porcelain; February 27, 2021

 

Two new categories named 'Bargain SALE Chinese porcelain' and 'Bargain SALE Japanese porcelain' have been created. The categories can be found in the left side menu.

 

In these categories Chinese and Japanese export porcelain objects for sale are now offered at a significantly reduced price.

 

If you are interested in a purchase, or want more information, one of the objects in these categories please feel free to contact me at: patergratiaorientalart@hotmail.com

2012387
2012387

Japanese Figures 1690-1800

 

Object 2012387

 

Figure of a small seated dog

 

Japan

 

18th century

 

Height 75 mm (2.95 inch), dimensions 42 mm (1.65 inch) x 35 mm (1.38 inch), weight 54 grams (1.90 ounce (oz.)),

 

Small figure of a seated dog with a curled tail and a collar. A small hole in the unglazed base with a vague textile imprint. Decorated in overglaze iron-red, orange, yellow, black and green enamel and gold. The dog has enamelled patches, a collar with a pendant, and whiskers around the beak.

 

Apparently, porcelain figures of humans and animals (leaping carp, cats, dogs and birds) were a successful export item. The Dutch ordered figures from the very start of the Japanese porcelain trade making use of an already existing market for such figures. The origin of the shapes of the models is still a puzzle, although it seems logical that the Japanese potters used Japanese sources when making the moulds, perhaps referring to the indigenous doll tradition, to prints or to carved figures. These 'exotic' figures played their part in the export assortment, and were either bought by the Dutch East India Company, (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie (VOC)), privately by Dutch merchants, or by the Chinese. Three main groups of figures can be discerned: figures in the Kakiemon palette, Imari figures and figures after European models. Enamelled figures come in many shapes and varieties and were included in the export assortment from the beginning of the Dutch porcelain trade.

 

This amusing figure of a small seated dog fits comfortably into the group of animals and figures that reached Europe in the early 18th century and were regard as exotica.(Jörg 2003/1, p.283)

 

No comparable figure of a seated small dog could be found in literature.

 

For a similarly decorated figure seated on an animal, please see:

Condition: A small and shallow glaze rough spot to the tip of the nose.

 

Reference:

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 357

  

Price: Sold.

 

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2012330
2012330

Kakiemon / Kakiemon style wares- Kakiemon style wares

 

Object 2012330

 

Dish

 

Japan

 

1685-1700 

 

Height 34 mm (1.34 inch), diameter of rim 210 mm (8.27 inch), diameter of footring 132 mm (5.20 inch), weight 410 grams (14.46 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on footring. On the base four spur-marks in a Y-pattern. Decorated in Kakiemon type enamels with a peony spray within a double circle in underglaze blue. On the sides two groups of rocks with flowering plants. On the reverse three flower sprays. Round the foot three underglaze blue lines, on the base a wide circle in underglaze blue. 

 

The enamelling is the main characteristic of Kakiemon and Kakiemon-style porcelain. As Imari, the enamel colours also developed out of the early enamels and became more transparent in time. In fact, the differences are minimal; it is the combination and the way of painting that makes it 'Kakiemon'. The vivid overglaze blue, the soft bluish-green, the brownish to light yellow, the light aubergine and especially the bight vermilion-red are characteristic. Black and gold are often used for details. Outlines are done in thin black lines drawn by a skilled and steady hand. A coffee-brown iron oxide is used on the edge of rims but never in the main decoration. (Jörg 2003/1, p.68)

 

Fitski states that Kakiemon production can be divided into two groups: pieces made in Nangawara which we call 'Kakiemon' and pieces made in Uchiyama, for which we use the appellation 'Kakiemon style'. This dish is representative of a group of pieces, mainly dishes, without the  milky-white nigoshide body which is the main characteristic of Kakiemon.  In this case, the porcelain is greyish with some impurities or kiln grit on the front and back. Such pieces were not made by the Kakiemon kiln, but by contemporary competitors and are therefore referred to as Kakiemon style. (Fitski 2011, pp.70-71, p. 90 & p.97)

 

For very similarly decorated dishes, please see:

Condition: Two hairlines to the rim.

 

References:

Shono 1973, cat. 86

Kyushu 1990, cat. 334

Kyushu 2003, cat. 1984

Impey 2002, cat. 85, 86 & 87

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 67

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2011600
2011600

Famille Verte wares 1680-1725

 

Object 2011600

 

Bowl

 

China

1700-1720

 

Height 74 mm (2.91 inch), diameter of rim 150 mm (5.91 inch), diameter of footring 60 mm (2.36 inch), weight 333 grams (11.75 ounce (oz.))

 

Bowl on footring, straight sides and an underglaze brown-edged rim (jia mangkou). Decorated in famille verte enamels, iron-red and gold with four roundels filled with various flowering plants. Round the rim four reserves filled with fish swimming among aquatic plants alternating with flower sprays and tree trunks reserved on a frogs' spawn ground. On the bottom a lotus flower head surrounded by aquatic plants. (Sargent 2012, p.183)

 

Fish are among the earliest known subjects on Chinese ceramics appearing in the Neolithic period of the fifth to fourth millennium BC. Fish are rich in symbolic meaning and are a symbol of wealth and abundance. Because of the phonetic similarity between the word yu, meaning fish, and yu, meaning abundance, images of fish in Chine came to be considered emblematic of wealth and prosperity. The reproductive power of fish is regarded as a symbol of regeneration and fecundity. And because fish are thought to swim in pairs, they are reputed to be the emblem of the joys of union, particularly of the sexual kind. (Ströber 2011, p.102)

 

From 1745 onward, Dutch East India Company VOC records mention "fish bowls". The name "fish bowl" is somewhat misleading, since it reminds one of goldfish. But naturally here a dish is meant, intended especially to serve fish. In papers from 1752/3 we encounter both terms: the same object is sometimes called "fish bowl", at other times a "fish dish". They are always easily recognisable by the decoration: four carp among water plants. Once again, there are three types: blue-and-white, Imari and enamel colours. The blue-and-white kind has been purchased on the merchants own initiative, for it does not occur in the order for 1750. There are four smaller dishes to match each fish dish, of course with the same pattern, to be used for shrimps or butter, according to the order for 1750. (Jörg 1986/1, pp.82-85)

 

For others objects, decorated with fish swimming among aquatic plants, earlier sold or for sale, please see:

Condition: Firing flaws to the footring and some wear to the decoration on the bottom 

 

References:

Jörg 1986/1, pp.82-85

Ströber 2011, p.102

Sargent 2012, p.183

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2012316
2012316

Japanese wares with Western Shapes or Designs 1653-1800

 

Object 2012316

 

Saucer

 

Japan

 

c.1700

 

Height 22 mm (0.87 inch), diameter of rim 128 mm (5.04 inch) x 103 mm (4.06 inch), diameter of footring 80 mm (3.15 inch) x 62 mm (2.44 inch), weight 76 grams (2.68 ounce (oz.))

 

Saucer or pattipan of lobed oval shape on a four-lobed footring. Decorated in underglaze blue with a European landscape with trees, a house and a bridge with two men and a horseman. Round the rim a dark blue border. The reverse in undecorated. Marked on the base with a six-character Chenghua mark.

 

Frederik van Frijtom (c.1632-1702)

 

Frederik van Frijtom (c.1632-1702) was a delft faience painter who specialised in plates, dishes and plaques with landscapes in blue. The elements that characterise his work include the wide blank rims of his plates and dishes, the detailed painting of trees and landscapes, and a specific way of drawing clouds, outlining them with small bows. His work shows idyllic, pastoral scenes with people riding horses, fishing from a boat, walking or hunting. Other Delft factories made pieces with similar scenes (and related scenes feature in the work of Dutch engravers and artists of that period), but Van Frijtom produced pieces of outstanding quality. He seemed to have made single items only, because no two pieces of the same design are known. (Jörg 2003/1, p.211)  

 

It is unknown when and where Van Frijtom was born. He married Lijntge Stevens, a spinster from Pernis, in Delft in 1652. They lived in 'In den gulden Brack' in the Molslaan in Delft, and had several children. He was doing well and bought real estate in Delft several times. After his wife died he married again with Elisabeth Verschouw, under a prenuptial agreement. His works are known from 1652 to 1702. He made paintings, often landscapes, mostly on panel and sometimes on canvas. However, he specialized for the Delft pottery industry in plate decorations and tile paintings. He found original decorative possibilities without using the usual symbols. A will in 1701 showed that he was ill. After his death in 1702, twelve porters carried him to his grave in the Nieuwe Kerk in Delft. (Wikipedia)

  

Frederik van Frytom life and work of a Dutch pottery decorator p.26

 

Reproduced from: Frederik van Frytom 1632-1702. Life and work of a Delft pottery-decorator. (A. Vecht, Scheltema & Holkema N.V., Amsterdam, 1968), p.26. This autogragph is not included in this sale/offer. (copyright in bibliographic data and images is held by the publisher or by their respective licensors: all rights reserved) 

 

The Frederik van Frijtom (c.1632-1702) style.

 

The Groninger Museum has two interesting, very rare early plates, each with a design clearly taken from a Delftware example, and it is tempting to connect them to the models brought over from The Netherlands in 1662. The Japanese copied not only the decoration from the Delft pieces, but also the flat base without a footring. They may represent a short-lived fashion, as it is difficult to find other examples of Dutch style decorations in the second half of the 17th century, apart from the pieces mentioned above. 

Then, unexpectedly, there was a varied output of pieces painted with Dutch landscapes, ships and harbour scenes in underglaze blue - no polychrome examples are known. Shapes include teapots. teacups and saucers, pattipans (saucers for teapots and milk jugs), plates and bowls. This type of decoration has been labelled the 'Frijtom' style.

 

This saucer or pattipan (a stand for a teapot or milk jug, or used as spoon tray) belongs to another category within the 'Frijtom' Group. The shape and decoration imitate a Delftware model in the Prinsenhof Museum, Delf, painted in the Frijtom style and dated to 1684, as part of a set of five different saucers. The motif of the horseman, the main element of the design, is also seen on other export ware. Two teacups with this design are in the Amsterdam Rijksmuseum (Arita 2000, cat.70); two others from the Gerry Collection are in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (Ford 1989).

 

F&C, p. 244 cat 314a

 

In his Fine & Curious on page 244, cat. 314a Jörg shows an example of an Dutch Delftware saucer, on the flat surface, within a blue line, a water landscape with a wooden bridge on which there is a horseman followed by two other men. To the right in the distance tall trees and a farmhouse. Blue border. Marked on the base: MB 1684, Prinsenhof Museum, Delft TDA126c. Reproduced from: Fine & Curious. Japanese Export Porcelain in Dutch Collections, (C.J.A. Jörg, Hotei Publishing, Amsterdam, 2003), p.244, cat. 314a. This saucer is not included in this sale/offer. (copyright in bibliographic data and images is held by the publisher or by their respective licensors: all rights reserved) 

 

It is a curiosity that these Japanese dishes / saucers were in turn copied in England at the Bow factory from c.1752 and there is even a Chinese version in the Ashmolean Collection. (Ayers, Impey & Mallet 1990, p.114Impey 2002, p.228 )

 

For an identically shaped and decorated saucers, please see:

 For an originally shaped and decorated Delftware saucer, please see:

Condition: Poor, professionally restored after being broken in two pieces, also a filled chip to the reverse rim.

 

References:

Vecht 1968, cat.42

Stamford 1981, cat. 36 & cat. 38 

Ayers, Impey & Mallet 1990, p.114

Arita 2000, cat. 69

Impey 2002, p.228 

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 314 & cat. 314a

 

Price: € 399 - $ 483 - £ 349

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2012346
2012346

Japanese Imari 1690-1800

 

Object 2012346

 

Bowl

 

Japan

 

1700-1720

 

Height 98 mm (3.86 inch), diameter of rim 222 mm (8.74 inch), diameter of footring 109 mm (4.29 inch), weight 901 grams (31.78 ounce (oz.))

 

Octagonal bowl on footring, spreading sides, everted rim, the edge upturned with indented corners. Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, iron-red, green, turquoise, yellow and gold. In the centre a roundel with a maple tree growing from rockwork near a fence with scattered flower heads floating in a pond. Round the rim reverse decorated pomegranates in iron-red on an underglaze blue ground with a diaper pattern in gold alternating with flower sprays tied with a knotted string. The outside with eight panels alternately filled with flowering plants growing from rockwork near a fence, a roundel filled with a banded hedge and flowering chrysanthemum and grasses reserved on an underglaze blue ground with a diaper pattern in gold, two copulating peacocks on a branch of a maple tree and a roundel filled with a geometrical/swastika pattern reserved on an underglaze blue ground with a diaper pattern in gold. Round the rim a border with upturned pointed leaves. Near the footring a wave pattern border. Round the foot a wavy scroll pattern border. On the base a two characters (shop/painter mark?) in iron-red in a double circle in underglaze blue and the remains of two rectangular paper labels.

 

A classical piece of Imari. The use of light green and turquoise enamels is characteristic of good quality Imari of the early 18th century. The border division is a remnant of the kraak-style period, re-interpreted and used in a different way. (Jörg 2003/1, p.118)

 

For similarly decorated objects, please see:

Condition: Two firing flaws and three tiny spots with loss of enamel.

 

References:

Impey 2002, cat. 331

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 127

Kyushu 2003, cat. 1922

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2012385
2012385

Japanese Imari 1690-1800

 

Object 2012385

 

Covered bowl

 

Japan

 

2nd half 18th century

 

Height including the cover 82 mm (3.23 inch), height excluding the cover 64 mm (2.60 inch), diameter of rim bowl 116 mm (4.41 inch), diameter of footring bowl 46 mm (1.65 inch), diameter of ring knob cover 37 mm (1.34 inch), diameter of rim cover 105 mm (4.09 inch), weight bowl 184 grams (4.82 ounce (oz.)), weight cover 84 grams (2.79 ounce (oz.)). 

 

Bowl on footring, narrow spreading rim, domed cover with ring knob. Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, iron-red, green and black enamel and gold with groups of flowering bamboo, pine and prunus. Near the footring a pointed lotus leaves pattern border. Inside the bowl and cover flowering bamboo plants and a blossoming prunus spray, round the rims zig zag lines pattern borders. On the outside of the cover flowering bamboo, pine and prunus plants and round the outside of the ring knob a lotus leaves pattern border. Marked on the base of the bowl and in the centre of the covers ring knob with a fuku ['luck'] mark within a double-lined square in seal script.

 

The lavish decoration on the inside of the cover is unusual and rarely found on Japanese export porcelain. The decorative pattern of the, rather coarse, blossoming prunus branches is characteristic for the later second half of the 18th century.

 

Condition: A firing flaw to the outer rim of the bowl and a frit to the outer ring knob.

 

Price: € 299 - $ 361 - £ 265

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2012343
2012343

Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - Dishes

 

Object 2012343

 

Dish

 

Japan

 

1700-1720

 

Height 53 mm (2.09 inch), diameter: 295 mm (11.61 inch), diameter of footring: 142 mm (5.59 inch), weight 1,033 grams (36.44 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on footring, spreading flat rim. On the base four spur-marks in a Y-pattern. Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, iron-red, green and gold. In the centre a roundel with a flower vase filled with flowering branches and four roundels filled with butterflies and bees and surrounded by a an upturned leaf shape-pattern. The sides with a ground of dense leafy scrolls in underglaze blue outlined in gold. Overlapping four large shaped panels alternating with four small shaped panels all filled with flower sprays. Groups of pomegranates alternate with groups of flowering chrysanthemum. On the reverse three wide spread chrysanthemum sprays. (Jörg 2003/1, pp.91-92)

 

The Imari style developed somewhere between 1670 and 1690, undoubtedly stimulated by the orders from the Dutch who liked the bright colours, the strong designs and the complex compositions. 'They got a of lot of decoration for their money', a collector once remarked and I think it was this, too, that appealed so much to buyers of Imari in The Netherlands and elsewhere in Europe. In fact, the Imari style conformed to the fashion for polychromy and gilt-work in Europe at the time. The 17th century was ' The Golden Age' for The Netherlands. It was a period of great economic and cultural expansion and its impact was felt well into the 18th century. The richly decorated Imari pieces fitted perfectly into the baroque interior and appealed to the taste of the rich bourgeoisie, enhancing their social status. 

 

Condition: Some wear to the decoration and some popped bubbles of glaze, caused by the firing process, to the rim.

 

Reference:

Jörg 2003/1, pp.91-92

 

Price: € 899 - $ 1,091 - £ 795

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2012382
2012382

Japanese Imari 1690-1800

 

Object 2012382

 

Bowl

 

Japan

 

1690-1710

 

Height 89 mm (3.50 inch), diameter of rim 195 mm (7.68 inch), diameter of footring 81 mm (3.19 inch), weight 575 grams (20.28 ounce (oz.))

 

Lobbed bowl on footring, spreading sides, lobed rim. Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, iron red, green, turquoise, yellow, gray and gold. Inside on the sides a large chrysanthemum spray, two sprays of a flowering plant and a large butterfly. In the centre a Chilon (sea-dragon) in a double concentric band. The inside sprays continue on the outside. The lower half with a foliate scroll border in underglaze blue. Round the foot a band with wavy lines in red. On the base a single concentric band.

 

An identically shaped, sized and decorated bowl incised with the Johanneum mark 'N=12' and signum square is in the collection of Augustus the Strong in Dresden and registered in the inventory of the collection in 1721 under number P.O. (Porzellan Ostasien) 4792. 

 

For this identically, shaped, sized and decorated bowl, please see;

Impey states that this bowl is unusual in that the blue-and-white decoration and the enamelled decoration are so totally separated. The enamelling is more typical of the type with no underglaze blue, both in style and in palette. (Impey 2002, p.200)

 

The shape of the bowl is mirrored by its decoration of a kiku-flower. Apart from the unusual, Chinese-style broad band round the foot and the Chilon (sea-dragon) in the centre, no underglaze blue was used in the decoration, allowing the enameller complete freedom. (Jörg 2003/1, p.96)

 

For an identically shaped and sized and similarly decorated bowl from the collection of the Duke of Northumberland, please see;

For another identically shaped and sized and similarly decorated bowl, please see;

Condition: Perfect with some firing flaws.

 

References:

Oxford 1981, cat. 227

Reichel 1981, cat. 65

Impey 2002, cat. 327

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 92

Ashmolean Museum Oxford

SKD Online collection

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2012381
2012381

Japanese Tea, Coffee and Chocolate wares 18th Century

 

Object 2012381

 

Teacup

 

Japan

 

1700-1720

 

Height 45 mm (1.77 inch), diameter of rim 75 mm (2.95 inch), diameter of footring 30 mm (1.18 inch), weight 55 grams (1.94 ounce (oz.))

 

Teacup on footring. Imari decorated in underglaze blue, overglaze iron-red, green, yellow, light aubergine, black enamel and gold with a continuous scene of a standing female figure, facing left, wearing a red kimono dress. To her right an open building with wooden roof, with a seated figure, a flowering cherry tree and a closed zig-zag shaped garden fence  with a group of flowering plants and two birds in flight amongst flowering cherry branches On the bottom a flower spray in a single concentric band round the inner rim floral scrolls in gold on an underglaze blue ground. 

 

This teacup belongs to the so-called five colour Imari group (gosai). This colour scheme consists of red, green, purple (aubergine) and/or yellow enamels with gold and underglaze blue. Soame Jenyns proposes that the lavish use of golden detailing on the underglaze blue was perhaps meant to hide the imperfections caused by blurring in the firing, a common characteristic of Japanese porcelain. Arts states (he quotes Soame Jenyns on this) that landscapes and human figures are less commonly found on five colour Imari.

 

Suchomel illustrates an Imari bowl with lid decorated with a very similar blossoming cherry tree motif (sakura). The cherry blossom is regarded as the most important flower of Japan, together with the chrysanthemum. One of the names of Japan is in fact "land of the cherry blossom". The cherry blossom is emblematic of purity of life and the samurai spirit. 

 

Jörg states that It is often not easy to distinguish between export and non-export wares, Imari was certainly not exclusively made for export. This particular type of Imari porcelain was highly esteemed in Japan. In this case, the existence of an identical decorated saucer in a Japanese collection could signify that these saucers were originally meant for the Japanese home market.

 

For this identically decorated saucer, please see:

Although the cups have roughly the same height and diameter, the diameter and the height of the saucers vary considerably (please see sizes above). Differences in measurements between the same plates or sets are not uncommon in Japanese porcelain. However, another interesting possibility is that the sets with small size saucers might have been used for serving tea while the larger versions were used for serving coffee.

 

Interestingly the design was also used for overdecorating in the Netherlands, 'Amsterdams Bont' in the early 18th century, Espir shows a plain white Chinese chocolate cup and saucer overdecorated 1708-1720 with the original Japanese design in a Kakiemon style, for this chocolate cup and saucer please see:

A very similar decorated small plate, again with a blossoming cherry tree, fenced garden and identical blue rim with golden scrollwork, however without the exceptional Japanese figures, is described in Impey’s 'Japanese Export Porcelain', cat. 330. Interestingly, he mentions that the Ashmolean Museum also has a Worcester cup and saucer of that same pattern in the Marshall collection.

 

Impey records a very similar decorated small plate, again with a blossoming cherry tree, fenced garden and identical blue rim with golden scrollwork, however without the exceptional Japanese figures. Interestingly, he mentions that the Ashmolean Museum also has a Worcester cup and saucer of that same pattern in the Marshall collection

 

Conditions: Perfect.

 

References:

Jenyns 1979, p.52 & p.54

Arts 1983, p.58 & p.141

Nagatake 1991, cat.18

Suchomel 1997, cat. 232

Impey 2002, cat. 330

Jörg 2003/1, p.91

Espir 2005, cat 14

 

Price: Sold.

 

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More pictures of object 2011955 another identically shaped and decorated, sold teacup and saucer >> 

More pictures of object 2011470 another identically shaped and decorated, sold saucer >>

2012383
2012383

Japanese Imari 1690-1800

 

Object 2012383

 

Small bowl

 

Japan

 

c.1700

 

Height 56 mm (2.20 inch), diameter of rim 95 mm (3.74 inch), diameter of footring 41 mm (1.61 inch), weight 105 grams (3.70 ounce (oz.))

 

Small bowl on footring, spreading sides with an everted rim. Imari decorated in underglaze blue, iron-red, green, yellow, gray black enamel and gold with a flowering prunus and chrysanthemum spray between iris and flowering wisteria plants four peony flower sprays. On the bottom a flower spray in a double concentric band in underglaze blue. Round the inner and outer rim a double concentric band in underglaze blue. Round the foot an upturned pointed leaves-pattern border in iron-red. Marked on the base with the Chinese four character mark featuring zhi 'Da Ming nian zhi', made during the Great Ming Dynasty. (Davison 1994, cat. 852)

 

The absence of underglaze blue, may or may not follow kiln practice. Evidence from potsherds at kiln-sites does not suggest that some kilns made either the one or the other, rather that all kilns seem to have made both. On the other hand, there is a tendency in most examples for those pieces without underglaze blue to be more finely decorated and to bear more refined enamels; this may mean that they were emulating the Kakiemon, and therefore it seems more likely that this would have been the practice of some kilns and not others. (Impey 2002, p.191)

 

The Chinese marks only showing the dynasty (Ming) but not the name of the reign (e.g. Wanli) is not often seen (normally the Emperor’s reign is more significant). However they were found among the provincial wares for during few eras, such as Zhengde, Wanli, Tianqi, and Chongzhen. I think it is possible that they meant to avoid offending the government by not quoting the name of Emperor on commercial ware. (I am indebted to Mr. S. Fan for this information)

 

For other similarly decorated objects please see:

Condition: Perfect.

 

References:

Davison 1994, cat. 852

Impey 2002, p.191 & pp.195-195

 

Price: € 749 - $ 910 - £ 665

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2010200
2010200

Southeast Asia / Other Ceramics

 

Object 2010200

 

Jarlet

 

Annamese (Vietnamese)

 

c.1500

 

Height 92 mm (3.62 inch), diameter 88 mm (3.46 inch), diameter of rim 29 mm (1.14 inch), diameter of footring 49 mm (1.93 inch), weight 269 grams (9.49 ounce (oz.))

 

Octagonal jarlet on footring with angled shoulder and a short upright neck. Crackled glaze. Decorated in underglaze blue with octagonal shaped panels filled with flowering plants alternating with rectangular shaped panels filled with a zig-zag-lines pattern. Round the shoulder panels with flower sprays alternating with panels with zig-zag lines. Round the shoulder an overlapping pointed lotus leaf-pattern border.

 

Similarly shaped and decorated jarlets were found amongst the salvaged cargo of the The Lena Shoal junk shipwreck which sank around 1490 during the Ming-Dynasty in the reign of the Emperor Hongzhi. The Lena shipwreck was discovered in 1997 at a depth of 48 meters.  She was wrecked on a reef and sank off the island of Busuanga, in the Philippines, one of about 7,000 islands, reefs and sandbanks in the area. It contained more than 5,000 objects, mostly Asian ceramics, but also small bronze guns, lacquer toilets, bronze bracelets, lead and iron ingots, woks, copper containers, spices, glass beads and elephant tusks. (source: UNESCO)

 

For similarly shaped and decorated jarlets, please see:

Condition: Some firing flaws to the footring caused by the firing process.

 

Reference:

Lammers en Ridho 1974, cat. 5A90/1945

 

Price: € 299 - $ 363 - £ 270

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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