Pater Gratia Oriental Art

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Sold Batavia Brown (Capucin wares) 1700-1800

 

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Page 1

In the Netherlands, porcelain decorated in this type of underglaze brown has historically been called "Batavia Brown" or "Capucijnergoed" ("Chick-pea ware", after the legume). The first name may have been coined because most goods exported to The Netherlands from the East were sent via Batavia and has nothing to do with a Batavian production or decoration, It is a very common type with the decoration usually contained within medallions. Occasionally, a gold decoration has been painted on the brown glaze. The brown colour is achieved by using iron oxide as a pigment, which like underglaze blue, needs to be fired at high temperatures. Considerable quantities were exported to the Western and Inter-Asian markets from c.1700. The pieces are rarely refined and can be considered as articles for everyday use by the middle-classes. (Jörg 2002/2, p.120

2011296
2011296

Sold Ceramics - Sold Batavia Brown (Capucin wares) 1700-1800 - Other wares - Page 1

 

Object 2011296

 

Dish

 

China

 

1740-1760

 

Height 30 mm (1.18 inch), diameter of rim 226 mm (8.90 inch), diameter of footring 122 mm (4.80 inch)

 

Dish on a footring with a glazed base and a flattened rim. Batavia Brown covered with underglaze light brown. Decorated in 'Red & Gold' / 'Rouge-de-fer' with encre de Chine and gold on the glaze. In the centre a reserved four pointed scalloped cartouche, a central roundel is decorated with a riverscape with a pavilion, rocky banks and trees, the roundel is surrounded by flowering peony plants alternating with flowering chrysanthemum plants. The scalloped reserves on the rim are filled with flowering peony plants alternating with reserved roundels, filled with riverscapes. The reverse is undecorated.

 

The combination of an object covered in Batavia Brown with 'Red & Gold' / 'Rouge-de-fer' and encre de Chine and gold on the glaze is unusual and rare.

 

For an identically shaped and decorated dish, please see:

Condition: A firing flaw to the exterior wall and a fleabite to the rim..

 

References:

Huitfeldt 1993., p.132

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, cat. 143 & cat. 251

 

Price: Sold.

 

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More pictures of object 2011298, another identically shaped, sized and decorated, sold dish >>

2011750 & 2011751
2011750 & 2011751

Sold Ceramics - Sold Batavia Brown (Capucin wares) 1700-1800 - Other wares - Page 1

 

Objects 2011750 & 2011751

 

A pair of miniature 'doll's house' vases

 

China

 

1750-1770

 

2011750 height 72 mm (2.83 inch), diameter 43 mm (1.69 inch), diameter of mouthrim 10 mm (0.39 inch), diameter of footring 24 mm (0.94 inch), weight 50 grams (1.76 ounce (oz.))

2011751 height: 72 mm (2.83 inch), diameter 42 mm (1.65 inch), diameter of mouthrim 10 mm (0.39 inch),

diameter of footring 24 mm (0.94 inch), weight 51 grams (1.80 ounce (oz.))

 

A pair of pear-shaped miniature 'doll's house' vases on a flat unglazed base. Covered with an even underglaze dark brown. Decorated in overglaze green, pink and black enamel with flowerheads and scrolls in two leaf-shaped panels.

 

At the beginning of the 18th century, there was a fashion among wealthy Dutch ladies to have models made on the scale of a house, the so called "doll's houses". The rooms of these doll's houses were furnished with miniature pieces of porcelain, furniture, paintings, upholstery and all other sorts of objects that would have belonged to the interior of a wealthy home. These doll's houses were very costly and certainly not meant for children to play with but were proudly displayed for friends and visitors and regarded as extremely luxurious items - counterparts of the cabinets of curiosities that were a fashionable hobby of rich men. Only a few of these doll's houses have been preserved. One example can be found in the Gemeentemuseum in The Hague showing an 18th century room with porcelain miniatures in cupboards and on brackets along the wall. In reality the majority of these "miniature doll's house vases" would have been part of the interior. A good example of an authentic porcelain room is the famous cabinet in Pommersfelden Castle, Germany, where groups of pieces on brackets are surrounded by these miniature vases lining the borders of the consoles. (Jörg & Flecker 2001, pp.50-51)

 

Condition:

2011750: Perfect.

2011751: Perfect.

 

Reference:

Jörg & Flecker 2001, pp.50-51

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2010113
2010113

Sold Ceramics - Sold Batavia Brown (Capucin wares) 1700-1800 - Other wares - Page 1

 

Object 2010113

 

Bowl

 

China

 

1740-1760

 

Height 70 mm (2.76 inch), diameter of rim 147 mm (5.79 inch), diameter of footring 63 mm (2.48 inch)

 

Bowl on footring. The outside Batavia Brown covered with underglaze dark brown. The inside Chinese Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, iron-red and gold. On the bottom a single flowering peony encircled by a single, concentric band. On the sides three flowering peony sprays in various stages of bloom. Around the rim a trellis pattern border with four reserves filled with a single flowering peony.

 

Batavia brown was very popular in the Netherlands and the Dutch East Indies. On this bowl the Batavia brown decoration method is combined with the popular Chinese Imari decorating style. (Jörg & Van Campen 1997, p.137)

 

Condition: Perfect.

 

References:

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, cat. 143

Jörg 2002/2, p.120, cat. 82.

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2010899
2010899

Sold Ceramics - Sold Batavia Brown (Capucin wares) 1700-1800 - Other wares - Page 1

 

Object 2010899

 

Vase

 

China

 

1740-1760

 

Height 197 mm (7.76 inch), diameter 101 mm (3.98 inch), diameter of mouthrim 29 mm (1.14 inch), diameter of footring 58 mm (2.28 inch)

 

Vase on a footring. Fitted with an unmarked Indonesian silver engraved mount. Batavia Brown covered with underglaze dark brown. Polychrome decorated in various, famille rose, overglaze enamels. On the body leaf-shaped reserves filled with flowering chrysanthemum and peony plants alternating with two smaller reserves filled with a single flowering plant.

 

This vase probably had an Indonesian provenance and was collected by a (former) owner when he or she lived in the Dutch East Indies. The mount, enhancing the shape, indicate the value such pieces had in local Indonesian communities, where they were often regarded as pusaka, holy and venerated heirlooms. (Jörg 2003/1, p.65)

 

Condition: Perfect.

 

References:

Jacquemart & Le Blant 1862, pp.77-105

Jörg 2002/2, cat. 82

Jörg 2003/1, p.65

Jörg 2003/2, cat. 8

 

Price: Sold.

 

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201026
201026

Sold Ceramics - Sold Batavia Brown (Capucin wares) 1700-1800 - Other wares - Page 1

 

Object 201026

 

Bowl

 

China

 

1740-1760

 

Height 70 mm (2.76 inch), diameter of rim 147 mm (5.79 inch), diameter of footring 61 mm (2.40 inch)

 

Bowl on a footring with a glazed base and a straight rim. The outside is covered with so-called Batavia-Brown, underglaze dark brown. Decorated in underglaze blue on the bottom with a single flowering peony encircled by a single, concentric band and on the sides two flowering plants. Around the rim a trellis pattern border with four reserves filled with a flower spray.

 

On this bowl the Batavia Brown decoration method is combined only with an underglaze blue decorating style. 

 

Condition: Perfect.

 

Reference:

Jörg 2002/2, cat. 82

 

Price: Sold.

 

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