Pater Gratia Oriental Art

Sold Ceramics

 

Sold Chine de commande

 

Western Subjects 1680-1800 

 

Various Subjects

 

Page 1

In the Sold Ceramics - Sold Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Various Subjects category the sold objects are categorized in the following alphabetical order: 

  • Amorous
  • Couples
  • Hunting Scenes
  • Indoor Scenes

 

Sold Amorous

 

2010701
2010701

Sold Ceramics - Sold Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Various Subjects - Amorous - Page 1

 

Object 2010701

 

Saucer

 

China

 

1725-1730

 

Height 19 mm (0.75 inch), diameter of rim 101 mm (3.97 inch), diameter of footring 58 mm (2.28 inch)

 

Saucer on footring, slightly everted rim. Polychrome decorated in various overglaze enamels and gold with a European couple in a landscape with mountains, clouds and pagodas watching, naughty chicken.

 

The subject on this saucer clearly has a hidden meaning, symbolizing sexual desire or hinting at forthcoming pleasures. The decorative function was more important than their practical usefulness, they were certainly never used when entertaining guests at a tea party. These kinds of amorous themes were immensely popular between 1720 and 1770. (Jörg 1989/2, p.190)

 

Condition: A restored rim.

 

Reference:

Jörg 1989/2, p.190

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2010185B
2010185B

Sold Ceramics - Sold Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Various Subjects - Amorous - Page 1

  

Object 2010185B

 

Teacup and saucer

 

China

 

1730-1735

 

Height of teacup 35 mm (1.38 inch), diameter of rim 68 mm (2.67 inch), diameter of footring 33 mm (1.29 inch)

Height of saucer 19 mm (0.75 inch), diameter of rim 107 mm (4.21 inch), diameter of footring: 62 mm (2.44 inch)

 

Teacup and saucer on footrings, everted rims with six small indentations. Polychrome decorated in overglaze blue, black and green enamel and 'Red & Gold' / 'Rouge-de-fer' with a European couple seated in beside an open bird-cage within a fenced garden. The teacup is decorated en suite

 

The decoration is know as the 'Liberty and Matrimony' design.

 

The cage with the bird was a well-known symbol of chastity and virginity in European art, and this design showing a couple and an open cage therefore had an erotic meaning. The Source of this decoration is a painting 'Le Dénicheur d’oiseaux' (The Bird Hunter), by the Frenchman Jean Baptiste Joseph Pater  Howard and Ayers state that the European original is commonly known as ´The Bird Seller´ but the meaning is allegorical, and a more appropriate title might be ´The Tender Trap´. The indented rim is characteristic of a group of well-enamelled tea-wares of a thin, pure body produced during the Yongzheng and Qianlong reigns. (Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. 2, p.360), (Hervouët 1986, p.90). (Jörg 1989/2, p.198), (Jörg & Van Campen 1997, p.213)

 

For similarly decorated objects, please see:

Condition:

Teacup: A Y-shaped hairline

Saucer: Two hairlines to the rim.

 

References:

Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. 2, cat. 349

New York 1985, lot 219

Hervouët 1986, cat. 4.26

Jörg 1989/2, cat. 75.

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, cat. 237

New York 2000, lot 256

 

Price: Sold.

 

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Not illustrated objects 2010185A/C/D, three other identically shaped, sized and decorated teacups and two saucers.

2010275
2010275

Sold Ceramics - Sold Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Various Subjects - Amorous - Page 1

 

Object 2010275

 

Teacup and saucer

 

China

 

1730-1735

 

Height of teacup 35 mm (1.38 inch), diameter of rim 75 mm (2.95 inch), diameter of footring 35 mm (1.38 inch)

Height of saucer 20 mm (0.79 inch), diameter of rim 115 mm (4.53 inch), diameter of footring 72 mm (2.84 inch)

 

Teacup and saucer on footrings, everted rims with six small indentations. Polychrome decorated in overglaze blue and black enamel and 'Red & Gold' / 'Rouge-de-fer' with an all over design of three monkeys opening a cage containing two birds, surrounded by flower sprigs. The teacup is decorated en suite.

 

In European iconography the monkey is a symbol of sexual desire and lust, while the cage with a bird inside alludes to chastity. This decoration therefore had an explicit erotic connotation. The source of this design which is very rare on Chine de commande, is still unknown. The indented rim is characteristic of a group of well-enamelled tea-wares of a thin, pure body produced during the Yongzheng and Qianlong reigns. (Jörg 1989/2, p.196), (Jörg & Van Campen 1997, p.213)

 

For an identically decorated teacup and saucer, please see: 

Condition:

Teacup: Two hairlines and a tiny fleabite to the rim.

Saucer: Perfect.

 

References:

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, cat. 237

Jörg 1989/2, cat. 74

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2011743
2011743

Sold Ceramics - Sold Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Various Subjects - Amorous - Page 1

 

Object 2011743

 

Teacup

 

China

 

1730-1735

 

Height 37 mm (1.46 inch), diameter of rim 74 mm (2.91 inch), diameter of footring 35 mm (1.38 inch), weight 39 grams (1.38 ounce (oz.))

 

Teacup on footring, slightly everted rim. Decorated in encre de Chine with gold and blue enamel with two cartouches showing a women who appears to be breastfeeding her child. In between the cartouches blue leafy scrolls. On the bottom a peony flower spray. Around the inner rim a foliate and floral scroll border.

 

This intriguing scene is copied from an unknown print. The woman seems to be breastfeeding her child. If it was the mother one would expect her just to be looking lovingly at her child.... instead the lady is looking away and smiling somewhat mischievous. This could point to a hidden (erotic?) meaning of the scene. 

 

For an Identically decorated teapot, please see:

Condition: Two frits to the rim, a Y-shaped hairline to the rim and a glaze hairline to the bottom. Some wear to the blue enamels.

 

Reference:

Amsterdam 1999, lot 335

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2012044
2012044

Sold Ceramics - Sold Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Various Subjects - Amorous - Page 1

 

Object 2012044

 

Teapot

 

China

 

1740-1760

 

Height with cover 130 mm (5.12 inch), height without cover 91 mm (3.58 inch), diameter handle to spout 185 mm (7.28 inch), diameter of mouthrim 58 mm (2.28 inch), diameter of footring 58 mm (2.28 inch), weight including cover 393 grams (13.86 ounce (oz.)), weight cover 78 grams (2.75 ounce (oz.))

 

Teapot of globular shape on footring. Straight spout with a curved C-shaped handle. Matching domed cover with pointed knob. Decorated in various overglaze enamels and gold with the 'The Valentine' or 'Alter of Love' pattern, a landscape scene with two love birds bill affectionately as they perch on Cupid's quiver while his bow lies nearby in the front an altar with two flaming hearts, the scene is flanked by a garlanded palm and pine or breadfruit tree. In the sky a bird, a butterfly and flocks of birds in flight. The cover is decorated en suite.

 

According to Motley this is a well known pattern found on a small range of Chinese export pieces. The origins are not clear but it seems to have been done for Lord Anson in 1743 and is based on a drawing by Sir Piercy Brett (c.1710-1781) who was Lieutenant on Anson's flagship HMS Centurion on his voyage round the world. (1740-1744) Anson made Brett captain of the Centurion while they were in Canton, 30 Sept 1743. Brett made many drawings during the voyage. The earliest version of this pattern have a breadfruit tree and a palm tree then appear in the centre of an export armorial dinner service with the arms of Anson. In this service the tree has garlands of flowers and many of the elements of this pattern are present: the flaming hearts on the altar, the dog, the shepherd's crook, the birds, the bow and arrows. Sometimes drawn back curtains are added which are very suggestive of an erotic voyeurism, resembling the drapes of a four poster bed. Such use of suggestive array was popular for an eighteenth century audience and would have been readily comprehensible to an educated eighteenth century eye. The use of pastoral imagery and symbolism as code for amorous activities was ubiquitous then. The Valentine design appears on its own in a number of English ceramic wares of the eighteenth century and it was used on Chinese export porcelain, armorial and pseudo-armorial objects as well. (Motley 2014)

 

Howard states that the idea for the Valentine pattern, by Piercy Brett, was certainly inspired by Anson and Piercy's stay on Tenian Island to collect breadfruit trees for the British West Indian colonies. An illustration in Anson's Voyages shows a very similar breadfruit tree and palm while other allusions are to absent loved ones. The Valentine pattern had a popularity which saw it produced in underglaze blue with hounds and puppies and with Chinese-looking shepherds in European clothes seated beneath pine trees. It was copied at Worcester and elements appear on Chinese snuffbottles and rim cartouches for a decade after the Anson's service. It became in fact part of the repertoire of Chinese workshops in Canton. (Howard 1994)

 

The Valentine design remained long in vogue; for in 1778 we still find it described as 'a burning altar, and two small doves on a quiver with a bow, and accessories' in the catalogue of a sale held in that year at Amsterdam of the stock of the porcelain-shop of Martha Raap. (Lunsingh Scheurleer 1974, p.158)

 

For identically, polychrome decorated objects, please see:

For similarly decorated objects, please see:

Condition: A firing tension hairline to the handle (caused by the firing process), fleabite to the tip of the spout and a chip to the tip of the knob.

 

References:

Goldsmith Phillips 1956, p.146 & plate 67

Beurdeley 1962,cat. 109

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1974, p.158 & cat. 295

Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. 1, cat. 204, & vol. 2, cat. 355

Hervouët 1986, cat. 7.118 & 7.119

Huitfeldt 1993, p.57 & pp.110-111

Howard 1994, cat. 77-80

Litzenburg 2003, cat. 158

Kerr 2011, pp.65-66 & p.135, nt. 12

Motley 2014, p.82, cat. 61

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2011808
2011808

Sold Ceramics - Sold Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Various Subjects - Amorous - Page 1

 

Object 2011808

 

Teapot

 

China

 

1740-1760

 

Height with cover 100 mm (3.94 inch), height without cover 77 mm (3.03 inch), diameter handle to spout 154 mm (6.06 inch), diameter of mouthrim 55 mm (2.17 inch), diameter of footring 50 mm (1.97 inch), weight including cover 279 grams (9.84 ounce (oz.)), weight cover 57 grams (2.01 ounce (oz.))

 

Teapot of globular shape on footring. Straight spout with a curved C-shaped handle. Domed pierced cover and pointed knob. Encre de Chine decorated with the 'The Valentine' or 'Alter of Love' pattern, a landscape scene with two love birds bill affectionately as they perch on Cupid's quiver while his bow lies nearby in the front an altar with two flaming hearts, flanked by a breadfruit tree with a shepherd's pipes. The cover is decorated en suite.

 

According to Motley this is a well known pattern found on a small range of Chinese export pieces. The origins are not clear but it seems to have been done for Lord Anson in 1743 and is based on a drawing by Sir Piercy Brett (c.1710-1781) who was Lieutenant on Anson's flagship HMS Centurion on his voyage round the world. (1740-1744) Anson made Brett captain of the Centurion while they were in Canton, 30 Sept 1743, and he did many drawings of the voyage. The earliest version of this pattern has a breadfruit tree and a palm tree then appear in the centre of an export armorial dinner service with the arms of Anson. In this service the tree has garlands of flowers and many of the elements of this pattern are present: the flaming hearts on the altar, the dog, the shepherd's crook, the birds, the bow and arrows. Sometimes drawn back curtains are added which are very suggestive of an erotic voyeurism, resembling the drapes of a four poster bed. Such use of suggestive array was popular for an eighteenth century audience and would have been readily comprehensible to an educated eighteenth century eye. The use of pastoral imagery and symbolism as code for amorous activities was ubiquitous then. The Valentine design was used on its own as well as on armorial and pseudo-armorial objects. (Motley 2014)

 

Howard states that the idea for the Valentine pattern, by Piercy Brett, was certainly inspired by Anson and Piercy's stay on Tenian Island to collect breadfruit trees for the British West Indian colonies. An illustration in Anson's Voyages shows a very similar breadfruit tree and palm while other allusions are to absent loved ones. The Valentine pattern had a popularity which saw it produced in underglaze blue with hounds and puppies and with Chinese-looking shepherds in European clothes seated beneath pine trees. It was copied at Worcester and elements appear on Chinese snuffbottles and rim cartouches for a decade after the Anson's service. It became in fact part of the repertoire of Chinese workshops in Canton. (Howard 1994)

  

For similarly decorated objects, please see:

Condition:Perfect.

 

References:

Goldsmith Phillips 1956, plate 67

Beurdeley 1962,cat. 109

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1974, cat. 295

Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. 1, cat. 204, & vol. 2, cat. 355

Hervouët 1986, cat. 7.118 & 7.119

Howard 1994, cat. 77-80

Litzenburg 2003, cat. 158

Motley 2014, p.82, cat. 61

britishmuseum.org

  

Price: Sold.

 

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Sold Couples

 

2010413
2010413

Sold Ceramics - Sold Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Various Subjects - Couples - Page 1

 

Object 2010413

 

Teacup

 

China

 

1725-1735

 

Provenance: R&G McPherson Antiques, London, UK, number 22060.

 

Height 38 mm (1.50 inch), diameter of rim 75 mm (2.95 inch), diameter of footring 35 mm (1.38 inch

 

Teacup on a footring with spreading sides and an everted rim. The base is glazed. Decorated in overglaze green enamel, iron-red, black and gold with a European couple and their dog walking in a Chinese garden, on the inner rim a narrow diaper pattern border with four reserves filled with a flower spray. On the base a circular paper label that reads 'R&G McPherson Antiques London W8, number 22060'.

 

Since Williamson (1927) this couple was named as such, referring to the Dutch Governor-General Diederik Durven (governor-general 1729-1931) and his wife Anna Catharina de Roo. Speculation has also led to the figures being misidentified as King Louis XIV of France and la marquise de Montespan or Madame de Maintenon.  

As Howard and Ayers rightly point out, there is no proof of this identification and it is much more likely that the design was based on a print or drawing, depicting a ‘happy Frisian couple’ of Dutch tradition in a general way. They also state that both D.F. Lunsingh Scheurleer and M. Beurdeley are also in agreement that the subject is Dutch rather than French (Jörg 1989/2, p.76), (Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. I, pp. 145-146 & plate 127

 

Sargent suggests a depiction of a “Sailor’s Farewell”, a theme which was used extensively on Western art of all media, and consequently it was fairly commonly depicted on export decorative arts including porcelain, reverse paintings on glass and lacquer. (Sargent 2012, pp.193-195

 

As it turns out, Howard & Ayers were right on the mark with their suggestion of a ‘happy Frisian couple’. In his Emden catalogue (2015), after he had made a closer study of the couple’s attire, Suebsman points out that both the man and woman are wearing clothing of the sort worn up to the mid-19th century at weddings in the Frisian community of Hindeloopen. Now but a small village, in the Dutch Golden Age Hindeloopen was a flourishing port town in which a considerable amount of trade was conducted.  

 

Bridal couple in Hindeloopen costume, taken from Th. Melkenboer, De Nederlandse Nationale Klederdrachten, Amsterdam 2017, plate 63.

 

Bridal couple in Hindeloopen costume, taken from Th. Melkenboer, De Nederlandse Nationale Klederdrachten, Amsterdam 2017, plate 63. 

 

The bridegroom has a tricorn (driesteek) on his head and is wearing a long coat with several knots, breeches and low shoes, whilst the bride sports a white net veil (witmoer). Her coat (wentke) was made not from local material but invariably from choice Indian chintz, usually embellished with exotic patterns in a brownish red. She carried her bag to the right to indicate that she was now spoken for. The dog on the plate is probably to be interpreted as a symbolical reference to the couple’s fidelity to one another.  

Couples and families in similar costume also exist in the form of blanc de Chine and polychrome figures from the late 17th and 18th centuries. A drawing of one such couple is documented on a coromandel lacquer chest-of-drawers illustrated in Hervouët & Bruneau. (Emden 2015/1, p. 97 cat. 72)

 

For an identically decorated teacup, please see: 

For identically decorated objects, please see: 

Condition: Three minute rim fleabites.

 

References:

Williamson 1927, pp.141-149

Beurdeley 1962, cat. 192

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1966, cat. 194

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1968, cat. 218

Gordon 1977, cat. 73

Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. I, pp. 145-146 & plate 127

Hervouët 1986, cat. 7.31

Jörg 1986/2, pp.517-521

New York 1985, lot 77

Jörg 1989/2, cat. 76 & 77

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1989, p.220-221, Afb.G

Kassel 1990, cat. 350

Antonin & Suebsman 2009, cat. 94

Schölvinck 2010, p.58

Sargent 2012, cat. 91

Emden 2015/1, p. 97 cat. 72

 

Price: Sold.

 

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Sold Indoor Scenes

 

2010460
2010460

Sold Ceramics - Sold Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Various Subjects - Indoor Scenes - Page 1

 

Object 2010460

 

Teacup

 

China

 

c.1735

 

Height 38 mm (1.50 inch), diameter of rim 72 mm (2.84 inch), diameter of footring 25 mm (0.98 inch)

 

Teacup on footring, slightly everted rim. Decorated in encre de Chine and gold with two European figures wearing Oriental clothes in an Oriental interior with a door.  One figure is standing wearing an elaborate robe holding a sprig of coral, the other with a dog on a leash beside a large vase decorated with a monster head (t'au-t'ie). The vase is filled with sprays of fungus and peacock feathers. Beside to the vase a wine pot and a pure depiction of an ancient bronze 'Hu', a water jug. On the bottom a decoration of an orchid (Cymbidium virescens), the Lan Hua a motif commonly seen on fine Chinese export porcelain of around 1740. On the inside rim a leafy scroll border reserved with flower heads. 

 

This scene is interesting because the Chinese painter choose to portrait these two European figures in the symbolism of his own country by placing two large peacock feathers, two coral branches and two fungi in a large vase, the first being a symbol of high rank, the other two stand for longevity. (Lunsingh Scheurleer 1974, p. 222)

 

Spruit states that in her opinion the figures depicted in this scene are "tribute carriers", figures carrying something precious on their way to present the objects to the Emperor and by doing so acknowledging his power. In a museum in Taiwan there is a painting on silk by Yen Li-pên (618-907) on which we can see local rulers with their servants on their way to bring grace to the Emperor. These figures are depicted with exotic hair, clothes and precious objects such as coral, animals and plants. The barefoot servants who carry the objects wear the same slave wrist collars as our little boy (also barefoot). The he-goat is similarly spotted as the dog. Perhaps we can state that Yen Li-pên's painting on silk and this 18th-century decoration are two testimonials of a familiar motif, because they were the "tribute carriers", surely for the 18th-century porcelain decorators. So it seems very likely that the nameless porcelain decorator who decorated this teacup somewhere in a Canton workshop during the mid 18th-century, depicted an image that he could relate to, most likely from images he had seen on prints or in books of 18th-century Chinese "tribute carriers". (Spruit 1967, pp.179-183)

 

For identically, in encre de Chine or polychrome, decorated objects please see:

Condition: A tiny restored frit to the rim.

 

References:

Williamson 1927 

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1966, cat. 213

Spruit 1967, pp.179-183

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1974, cat. 222

Hervouët 1986, cat. 5.8

London 1990, lot 154

 

Price: Sold.

 

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More pictures of object 2011831, an identically decorated, sold saucer >>