Pater Gratia Oriental Art

Sold Ceramics

 

Sold Japanese Blue and White wares 17th Century

 

Dishes

 

Page 2

The knowledge and expertise required to make porcelain was already present in Japan as far back as the early 17th century. According to legend a Korean potter discovered clay suitable for making porcelain near Arita on the island of Kyushu in the south of Japan in around 1605. Porcelain made from this clay, called shoki-Imari, was intended for the foreign market and soon acquired a surprisingly characteristic Japanese style of decoration, first with a blue underglaze decoration and later in enamel colours. The experience of the manufacturers with enamel colours turned out to be of great importance later. (source: Groninger Museum, Groningen) 

 

When Japanese potters started to make porcelain. It was inspired by underglaze blue porcelain manufactured in kilns of Southern China. By the mid-17th century, Chinese porcelain went into decline due to social unrest and accompanying dynastic change. Dutch merchants, from their base on the small island of Deshima, near Nagasaki, were permitted to trade with Japan. Responding to European demand, the Dutch encouraged the fledgling Japanese porcelain industry to fill the gap left by China.

 

The porcelain the Dutch brought to Europe in the 17th century was in most cases consciously designed to cater to western tastes. To ensure that they would find a ready market, the Dutch often made wooden or earthenware models of designs and sent those to Japan to be copied. 

 

Flasks, ewers and large dishes are examples for shapes made for the Dutch. They are painted in underglaze blue or a palette of enamels dominated by red, green and blue with flowers, figures and landscapes which would not follow traditional Japanese aesthetics. Vessels with landscape designs are often inspired by 17th century Chinese Transitional style. Plates decorated with designs organized by panels imitate the successful blue-and-white Chinese Kraak ware. To make these export wares even more attractive for the Dutch clients numbers of early Japanese export wares are painted with a stylized tulip, referring to the tulipomania, the great Dutch craze of the 1630s. (source: Keramiek Museum Princessehof, Leeuwarden)

2012390
2012390

Sold Ceramics - Sold Japanese Blue and White wares 17th Century - Dishes - Page 2

 

Object 2012390

 

Dish

 

Japan

 

1680-1700

 

Height 64 mm (2.52 inch), diameter of rim 345 mm (13.58 inch), diameter of footring 190 mm (7.48 inch), weight 1,242 grams (43.81 ounce (oz.))

 

Deep dish on footring, spreading sides. On the base five spur-marks in a X-pattern. Decorated in underglaze blue with large branches of peaches and 'Buddha's hand' or finger-lemon fruit, covering the whole surface. Around the rim, a single line. On the reverse three peach sprays, a double line round the footring, a single line within.

 

Dishes of this shape and size with identical design are also known with a central small circle filled with the VOC (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie) monogram. The VOC (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie) monogram is repeated on the base. This type, marked on both sides, is mentioned in the Batavia order of 1686 where it is stated that it was destined for the Governor-General's residence. The monogram is remarkably small. Dishes with a similar design, but without the monogram are well known. (Jörg 2003/1, p.228)

 

FC cat 289 p228 klein

 

In his Fine & Curious on page 228, cat. 289 Jörg shows an example of a dish with an identical design and a central small circle filled with the VOC (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie) monogram (this dish is not included in this sale/offer). Reproduced from: Fine & Curious. Japanese Export Porcelain in Dutch Collections, (C.J.A. Jörg, Hotei Publishing, Amsterdam, 2003), p.40, cat. 22. (copyright in bibliographic data and images is held by the publisher or by their respective licensors: all rights reserved) 

 

The design on this dish was selected by the Dutch for the Arita potters to copy with the addition of the VOC (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie) monogram. A large branch of three peaches is combined with another of three finger citrons in a symbolic union signifying a long and happy life. The finger citron is a fragrant, inedible fruit also known as Buddha's hand because it evokes one of the hand positions in Buddhist ritual. It is an indispensable offering to the Chinese God at New Year and is one of the three symbolic fruits. Anyone fortunate enough to witness a Chinese spring when he parched brown earth is miraculously clothed in a mantle of delicate pink blossoms will readily understand why the peach, the second symbolic fruit, is believed to possess more vitality than any other tree and represents longevity and immortality. This symbolism, as is often the case, is reinforced by the spoken language for the Chinese sound shou implies both peach and longevity.

The contrast between the soft rounded flesh of the peaches and the hard inedible fingers of the citron is vividly caught and exemplifies the fidelity to nature characteristic of much Transitional art.

It is fully understandable that the Dutch were attracted by both the originality and beauty of this design but they betrayed a lack of judgement in selecting it for the addition of their monogram.

To achieve its full effect decoration of this type requires an uninterrupted 'canvas'; it is totally unsuited to additions, and, no matter how skilled the artist, a cypher cannot be incorporated with complete success.

Japanese versions of this pattern were made with and without the monogram and inevitably the unmonogrammed are the more attractive. In Japanese hands the design, even at its best, lacks both the botanical fidelity and the rhythmic coherence. Almost certainly the Japanese potter had a Chinese example before him when he made the first of his copies. Not only is the main motif faithfully reproduced but the shape and size as well, and even the three branches of fruiting peach found on the outer walls are included.

An unmonogrammed dish at the Princessehof Museum, Leeuwarden is a handsome piece of fine quality. It is carefully and forcefully painted but when compared to the Chinese prototypes it is clear that the Japanese copyist, by a slight rearrangement, has faild to capture the subtle rhythm of the originals which he has further dissipated by introducing a number of small, leafless. spiky twigs beloved of the Japanese. By these apparently minor changes a harmonious and tranquil design has become restless. (Woodward 1974, pp.71-73

  

The 'Fingered citron or Buddha's hand' (Citrus medica) is a small, open citrus with distinctive fruit, native to the foothills of the Himalayas. Around 320 BC, Greeks and Romans used the fruit as a source of fragrance and the leaves as a moth repellent. The fruit has also been used for centuries to perfume clothes and rooms, as ornaments in religious ceremonies and is appreciated for its medicinal qualities. This explains why the Chinese treated it as a precious decorative object in the old days. When the pomegranate ripens it opens up and exposes lots of seeds inside. Chinese people like it's pretty appearance, signifying many offspring /children to come. (I am indebted to Mr S. Fan for this information)

 

For identically shaped, sized and in underglaze blue decorated dishes, please see:

For identically shaped, sized and decorated dishes, with the VOC (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie) monogram. please see:

For a similarly in underglaze blue decorated dish, please see:

Similarly decorated dishes were also found amongst the cargo of the Ca Mau shipweck, c.1725, please see:

For an identically shaped, and similarly in famille verte enamels decorated dish, please see:

Condition: A hairline in the centre.

 

References:

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1971, cat. 55 & 56

Woodward 1974, pp.71 tm 73, cat. 101,102,103 & 104

Ayers, Impey & Mallet 1990, cat. 33

Jörg 2002/2, cat. 75

Impey 2002, cat. 35

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 289

Amsterdam 2007, lot 757

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2012037
2012037

Sold Ceramics - Sold Japanese Blue and White wares 17th Century - Dishes - Page 2

 

Object 2012037

 

Dish

 

Japan

 

1670-1700

 

Height 76 mm (2.99 inch), diameter 443 mm (17.44 inch), diameter of footring 208 mm (8.19 inch), weight 3,056 grams (107.80 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on footring, flat rim. On the base six spur-marks in a star-pattern. Decorated in underglaze blue with a flower basket with scalloped overhead handle filled with a blossoming tree. On the sides scrolling branches of pine, prunud and bamboo (shõ-chiku-bai). The rim with scrolling foliage and pine filling the ground. On the reverse two large flowering peony sprays.

 

The decoration with prunus, pine and bamboo (shõ-chiku-bai) is also known as the 'Three Friends of Cold Winter'. The design originated in China. It is the combination of pine, bamboo and prunus, symbolically representing Confucius, Buddha and Lao Tse. Once the 'three friends' were standing around a jar containing vinegar. Each of them tasted the liquid. Lao Tse, the gentle, called it, sweet, Buddha, the meditator, called it bitter and Confucius called it sour. But they eventually agreed that it was all the same liquid. This legend represents the idea that the three 'religions' originated from the same source. The 'friendship' of the three trees is further suggested by the property they have in common of strength during hard times. The bamboo bends with the wind but never breaks, the prunus flowers even when there is still snow and the pine is an evergreen. Together they symbolically represent long life and happiness. (Arts 1983, p.140)   

 

In Japan porcelain is being produced since c.1600. Due to the internal conflicts in China during the second half of the 17th century kilns were destroyed, the porcelain production staggered and supply routes were cut off. In order to keep up with the ever-growing demand for porcelain from the homeland the VOC, switched to Decima, Japan. Since 1641 a Dutch trading post was based on this artificial Island in the Bay of Nagasaki. With expanding Japanese production, due to Dutch demand, the decorative elements, the designs and the more freely way in which they were applied by the porcelain decorators became more Japanese. It marked a clear change from the traditional Japanese interpretation of Chinese kraak designs. The powerful centre design and both continuous scrolls on this specific dish are good examples of that change. (Jörg 2003/1, p.260)

 

Condition: A short scratch to the glaze on the base.

 

References:

Arts 1983, p.140

Jörg 2003/1, p.260

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2011892
2011892

Sold Ceramics - Sold Japanese Blue and White wares 17th Century - Dishes - Page 2

 

Object 2011892

 

Dish

 

Japan

 

1660-1690

 

Height 110 mm (4.33 inch), diameter of rim 619 mm (24.37 inch), diameter of footring 305 mm (12.01 inch)

 

Large dish on footring. Wide spreading flat rim. On the base six spur-marks. Decorated in underglaze blue with birds and a flowering plant growing from rockwork in a circular cartouche. The sides and rim in Chinese kraak style (fuyõ-de with six equal wide panels) outlined with two lines each filled with flowering plants and two birds. The reverse is undecorated.

 

These kind of extremely large dishes (550 mm (21.65 inch) inches and up) were probably used for display as luxury items and were not meant for daily use. In Japan large dishes and bowls were only used in exceptional cases, such as certain initiation rites of the nobility. These large dishes came into fashion in the second half of the 17th century. They are proof of the fact that by that time the technical skills of the Japanese potters had developed to a very high level as firing these massive dishes required great technical skill. (Ostkamp 2011, p.12 & p.31, note 39).

 

This type of border with six equal panels generally containing plants is best known from the plates with the East India Company monogram in a landscape adapted to incorporate. Sometimes these equal panels are outlined with two lines as on K'ang Hsi porcelain. (Lunsingh Scheurleer 1971, p.14 & p.50)

 

For smaller, identically decorated, dishes please see;

Condition: Near perfect, only a firing flaw in the centre and a shallow chip to the footring.

 

References:

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1971, p.14, p.50 & cat. 24

Kyushu 1990/1, cat. 62 & cat. 63

Ostkamp 2011, p.12 & p.31, note 39

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2012377 & 2012378
2012377 & 2012378

Sold Ceramics - Sold Japanese Blue and White wares 17th Century - Dishes - Page 2

 

Objects 2012377 & 2012378

 

A pair of dishes

 

Japan

 

1670-1690

 

2012377: height 32 mm (1.26 inch), diameter of rim 215 mm (8.46 inch), diameter of footring 109 mm (4.29 inch), weight 382 grams (13.47 ounce (oz.))

2012378: height 35 mm (1.38 inch), diameter of rim 210 mm (8.27 inch), diameter of footring 111 mm (4.37 inch), weight 368 grams (12.98 ounce (oz.))

 

Two dishes on footrings, flat rims. On the bases four spur-marks in a Y-pattern. Decorated in underglaze blue with insects, birds and a flowering plant growing from rockwork. The sides and rim in Chinese kraak style (fuyõ-de with six equal wide panels) outlined with two lines each filled with flowering plants, insects and two birds. On the reverses four wide spread flower sprays.

 

This type of border with six equal panels generally containing plants is best known from the plates with the East India Company monogram in a landscape adapted to incorporate. Sometimes these equal panels are outlined with two lines as on K'ang Hsi porcelain. (Lunsingh Scheurleer 1971, p.14 & p.50)

 

The four wide spread flower sprays on the reverse rim are a rare decorating design on dishes of this period it seems to have been copied from Chinese wares from the Kangxi period.

 

For smaller, identically decorated, dishes please see;

Condition: 

2012377: Perfect with some kiln grit adhering to the inner footring caused by the firing process.

2012378: Perfect with two firing flaws, caused by the firing process.

 

References:

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1971, p.14, p.50 & cat. 24

Kyushu 1990/1, cat. 62 & cat. 63

Ostkamp 2011, p.12 & p.31, note 39

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2011979ABC
2011979ABC

Sold Ceramics - Sold Japanese Blue and White wares 17th Century - Dishes - Page 2

 

Object 2011979ABC

 

Three dishes

 

Japan, Arita presumably Sarugawa

 

1670-1690

 

2011979A: height 31 mm (1.22 inch), diameter of rim 216 mm (8.50 inch), diameter of footring 105 mm (4.13 inch), weight 422 grams (14.89 ounce (oz.))

2011979B: height 33 mm (1.30 inch), diameter of rim 213 mm (8.39 inch), diameter of footring 102 mm (4.02 inch), weight 414 grams (14.60 ounce (oz.))

2011979A: height 34 mm (1.34 inch), diameter of rim 213 mm (8.39 inch), diameter of footring 100 mm (3.94 inch), weight 365 grams (12.88 ounce (oz.))

 

Three dishes on footrings, flat rims. On the bases of two dishes a single spur-mark and on the base of the third dish three spur-marks in a V-pattern. Decorated in underglaze blue with flowering chrysanthemum and fruiting pomegranate branches. The sides divided into panels filled with flower sprays. The reverses are undecorated.

 

Condition: 

2011979A: Perfect.

2011979B: A tiny fleabite to the rim.

2011979C: Perfect.

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2011909
2011909

Sold Ceramics - Sold Japanese Blue and White wares 17th Century - Dishes - Page 2

 

Object 2011909

 

Dish

 

Japan

 

1670-1700

 

Height 33 mm (1.30 inch), diameter of rim 277 mm (10.91 inch), diameter of footring 143 mm (5.63 inch), weight 624 grams (22.01 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on footring, flat rim. On the base four spur-marks (all still attached) in a Y-pattern. Crackled glaze. Decorated in underglaze blue with prunus flower sprays, a bare branch and a bird on rockwork in a low flowerpot, the flower pot is flanked by two small bamboo plants. This has been placed in a sketchily painted landscape near a lake. On the sides and rim large-scale spiralling karakusa scrolls with lotus flowers The reverse is undecorated.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On the base four spur-marks (all still attached) in a Y-pattern, making the centre of the dish slightly convex and the lower part of the flat rim slightly bending down.

 

The flowerpot evokes Chinese kraak porcelain where this motif sometimes occurs differently. Otherwise the motifs, the composition and the style are decidedly Japanese. For example, by giving the large spiny karakusa scroll (kara meaning Chinese and kusa meaning grass) a bold continuous frame, the centre decoration is made the focus of attention and has more depth than is usual on kraak porcelain. This dish exemplifies the rapid change in Japanese export porcelain from meticulously imitating Chinese examples towards a more unrestrained, Japanese decorative style. (Jörg 2003/1, p.181

 

For identically decorated dishes, please see;

Condition: Overall fine crazing to the glaze. A chip with a short connected hairline to the rim.

 

References:

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1971, cat. 37

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1977, cat. 253

London 1997, cat. 27

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 123, & p.260

 

Price: Sold.

 

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More pictures of object 2012388, a smaller identically, shaped and decorated, sold, dish >>

2011506
2011506

Sold Ceramics - Sold Japanese Blue and White wares 17th Century - Dishes - Page 2

 

Object 2011506

 

Dish

 

Japan

 

1670-1700

 

Height 60 mm (2.36 inch), diameter of rim 360 mm (14.17 inch), diameter of footring 180 mm (7.09 inch), weight 1.647 grams (58.10 ounce (oz.))

 

Exhibited: The Asian Galleries Reinmagined - Color Across Asia held from 21 December 2016 to 13 May 2018 at the Ackland Art Museum, The University of North Carolina at Chaphil Hill, The United States of America, Object Guide no. 28.

  

Dish on footring, flat rim. On the base five spur-marks. Decorated in underglaze blue with flowering chrysanthemums growing from behind a fence and flowering peonies growing from pierced rockwork enclosed by a triple concentric band. On the rim a border of large-scale karakusa (spiky lotus) design with flowers. The reverse is undecorated.

 

In Japan porcelain is being produced since c.1600. Due to the internal conflicts in China during the second half of the 17th century kilns were destroyed, the porcelain production staggered and supply routes were cut off. In order to keep up with the ever growing demand for porcelain from the homeland the VOC, switched to Decima, Japan. Since 1641 a Dutch trading post was based on this artificial Island in the Bay of Nagasaki. With expanding Japanese production due to Dutch demand the decorative elements the designs and the more freely way in which they were applied by the porcelain decorators became more Japanese. It marked a clear change from the traditional Japanese interpretation of Chinese kraak designs. The powerful centre design and continuous karakusa scroll (kara means Chinese, kusa means grass) on this specific dish are good examples of that change. (Jörg 2003/1, p.260)

 

Shards of a similar decorated dish were excavated from the wreck of the Swedish East Indiaman Götheborg that ran aground and sunk in 1745 less than a kilometre short of her home port.

 

For identically decorated dishes, please see;

For dishes with identical karakusa decorated rims, please see;

Condition: Perfect.

 

References:

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1971, cat. 34

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1977, cat. 253

Wästefelt et al. 1991, p.59

Suchomel 1997, cat. 23

Impey 2002, cat. 129

Jörg 2002/2, cat. 123

Jörg 2003/1, p.260 & cat. 138

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2012126
2012126

Sold Ceramics - Sold Japanese Blue and White wares 17th Century - Dishes - Page 2

 

Object 2012126

 

Dish

 

Japan

 

1680-1700

 

Height 26 mm (1.02 inch), diameter of rim 202 mm (7.95 inch), diameter of footring 105 mm (4.13 inch), weight 261 grams (9.21 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on footring, flat rim. On the base four spur-marks in a Y-pattern. Decorated in underglaze blue with a seated lady, flanked by children holding and waving a fan, in a theatre like setting. The lady observes the lodge of the theatre filled with a hundred children. The reverse is undecorated.

 

The lady depicted is most likely the Chinese goddess Guan Yin. Porcelain decorated with this design is known as 'Guan Yin in the hall of the hundred children'. Two versions of the design are known, one as described the other with a banderol filled with Chinese characters just above the box of the seated Guan Yin. The dishes were probably made from the end of the seventeenth century and for many decades. The design probably originated from China. Dishes like these were usually given to family members, whishing them rich offspring.

 

Guan Yin is the fertility goddess who left the greatest impact in the mortal world with many temples built in her honour. The ancient Chinese believed that after one prayed to her and brought a pair of embroidered shoes home, one would conceive a son soon. In some Chinese families today, she is a revered figure. Guan Yin is usually depicted as a beautiful, dignified and benevolent goddess carrying a child or holding a vase with a willow branch in it. These symbolise her duties of 'bestowing sons' and 'showering of compassion on mortal world'.

 

The Legend of Guan Yin Bringing Sons

Long ago there was a Taoist priest who needed the hearts of hundred young boys to produce the elixir of life. So he kidnapped hundred boys and locked them up in a dark room first.

Coincidentally on this night, Guan Yin was passing by and heard the cries of the children, She saw the priest sharpening his knife beside a pill on the table. Guan Yin flicked the pill away. She drew the priest out of the dark room and saved the children. However, Guan Yin did not know where the children stayed or who their parents were. Then she remembered hearing of an official in his fourties who was corrupt and childless. She thought of teaching him a lesson so she left the hundred children at his doorstep.

Upon discovering the children, the couple kept two children and decided to sell the rest for ten taels of silver per child. By dawn the next day. all the children had been taken away by many men and women. A magistrate's runner reported a young lady was responsible for it and she lived in the abode of Guan Yin. The couple knew it was the act of Guan Yin and died out of fright.

In this way, the story of Guan Yin bringing sons spread among the people. Now childless couples would pray to Guan Yin for a healthy baby. (Chinese Auspicious Culture, Beijing Foreign Language Press)

 

For a comparison between a Japanese and a Chinese version of the design, please see:

For an identically shaped, sized and decorated dish, please see:

For an identically shaped, sized and decorated dish with a banderol filled with Chinese characters, please see:

For a similarly decorated, Japanese bowl, please see:

Condition: Perfect.

 

References:

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1971, cat. 61 & 62

Daendels 1981, cat. 5a & 5b

Kyushu 1990, cat. 470

Kyushu 2003, cat. 3111

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2012237
2012237

Sold Ceramics - Sold Japanese Blue and White wares 17th Century - Dishes - Page 2

 

Object 2012237

 

Dish

 

Japan

 

1680-1700

 

Height 23 mm (0.91 inch), diameter of rim 206 mm (8.11 inch), diameter of footring 112 mm (4.41 inch), weight 332 grams (11.71 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on footring, flat rim. On the base four spur-marks in a Y-pattern. Decorated in underglaze blue with a seated lady, flanked by children holding and waving a fan, in a theatre like setting. A banderol, filled with Chinese characters is just above the box of the seated Guan Yin. The lady observes the lodge of the theatre filled with a hundred children. The reverse is undecorated.

 

The lady depicted is most likely the Chinese goddess Guan Yin. Porcelain decorated with this design is known as 'Guan Yin in the hall of the hundred children'. Two versions of the design are known, one with and one without the banderol filled with Chinese characters just above the box of the seated Guan Yin. The dishes were probably made from the end of the seventeenth century and for many decades. The design probably originated from China. Dishes like these were usually given to family members, whishing them rich offspring.

 

For an example of the version without the banderol, please see:

Guan Yin is the fertility goddess who left the greatest impact in the mortal world with many temples built in her honour. The ancient Chinese believed that after one prayed to her and brought a pair of embroidered shoes home, one would conceive a son soon. In some Chinese families today, she is a revered figure. Guan Yin is usually depicted as a beautiful, dignified and benevolent goddess carrying a child or holding a vase with a willow branch in it. These symbolise her duties of 'bestowing sons' and 'showering of compassion on mortal world'.

 

The Legend of Guan Yin Bringing Sons

Long ago there was a Taoist priest who needed the hearts of hundred young boys to produce the elixir of life. So he kidnapped hundred boys and locked them up in a dark room first.

Coincidentally on this night, Guan Yin was passing by and heard the cries of the children, She saw the priest sharpening his knife beside a pill on the table. Guan Yin flicked the pill away. She drew the priest out of the dark room and saved the children. However, Guan Yin did not know where the children stayed or who their parents were. Then she remembered hearing of an official in his fourties who was corrupt and childless. She thought of teaching him a lesson so she left the hundred children at his doorstep.

Upon discovering the children, the couple kept two children and decided to sell the rest for ten taels of silver per child. By dawn the next day. all the children had been taken away by many men and women. A magistrate's runner reported a young lady was responsible for it and she lived in the abode of Guan Yin. The couple knew it was the act of Guan Yin and died out of fright.

In this way, the story of Guan Yin bringing sons spread among the people. Now childless couples would pray to Guan Yin for a healthy baby. (Chinese Auspicious Culture, Beijing Foreign Language Press)

 

For a comparison between a Japanese and a Chinese version of the design, please see:

For an identically shaped, sized and decorated dish, please see:

For an identically shaped, sized and decorated dish with a banderol filled with Chinese characters, please see:

For a similarly decorated, Japanese bowl, please see:

Condition: Perfect.

 

References:

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1971, cat. 61 & 62

Daendels 1981, cat. 5a & 5b

Kyushu 1990, cat. 470

Kyushu 2003, cat. 3111

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2012062
2012062

Sold Ceramics - Sold Japanese Blue and White wares 17th century - Dishes - Page 2

 

Object 2012062

 

Dish

 

Japan

 

1680-1700

 

Height 38 mm (1.50 inch), diameter of rim 149 mm (5.87 inch), diameter of footring 78 mm (3.07 inch), weight 198 grams (6.98 ounce (oz.))

 

Decagonal dish on footring, moulded sides, upturned underglaze brown-edged rim. On the bas a single supr-mark. Decorated in underglaze blue with a river scene covering the whole surface. On the right-hand bank two scholars seated at a table near a flowering prunus tree, on the opposite bank a servant near a banana tree, walking towards a bridge. On the reverse, a foliate scroll. Marked on the base with a square fuku (good luck) mark in running script.

 

For a similarly decorated dish, please see:

Condition: Restored.

 

Reference:

London 1997, cat. 78

 

Price: Sold.

 

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