Pater Gratia Oriental Art

Chinese Porcelain

 

Chine de commande

 

Western Subjects 1680-1800

 

Page 1

Chinese porcelain with a shape and/or decoration copied directly from a European model is called 'Chine de commande'. It is a special group within the much wider assortment of Chinese export porcelain. There are different varieties: the Western shape with a Chinese decoration, the Chinese shape with a Western decoration, and the Western shape with a Western decoration. Such shapes often are derived from models brought from Europe. The Chinese porcelain painter also copied the Western decorations as best as he could, mostly using European prints as his model. There is an enormous variety of designs of this type: scenes from classical mythology, historical and political events, landscapes with a view of a village or town, amorous or erotic depictions, portraits, religious scenes, etc. A specific type, 'encre de Chine', with its thin, almost drawn lines of grey-black enamel, was best suited to imitate the lines of Western engravings. The designs for commande made by the Dutch artist Cornelis Pronk, in particular the so-called 'Parasol Lady', ordered in three different colour schemes are particularly famous. The VOC (Dutch East India Company, 1602–1799) ordered these between 1735 and 1740 as an expensive exception to the variety of ordinary porcelain that the Company normally bought. Commande was popular throughout the 18th century. Decorations in underglaze blue were painted in the factory; those in enamels were done in muffle kilns in Canton, especially after c.1740.

 

Chine de comande - Western Subjects 1680-1800

 

Chine de comande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 decorated objects are, if available, categorized in the following alphabetical order:

 

- Mythological and Religious Subjects 

- Various Subjects

 

Mythological and Religious Subjects

 

 - Mythological Subjects

2010884
2010884

Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Mythological and Religious Subjects - Mythological Subjects - Page 1

 

Object 2010884

 

Milk jug

 

China

 

1740-1750

 

Height 103 mm (4.05 inch), diameter 73 mm (2.87 inch), diameter of rim 35 mm (1.38 inch), diameter of footring 40 mm (1.57 inch), weight 196 grams (6.91 ounce (oz.))

 

Milk jug on footring, pear shaped body with handle, small triangular spout at the rim. The handle is placed opposite the spout. Rim unglazed inside for cover, now missing. Decorated in encre de Chine, iron-red, gold and a pink gold wash with a mythological scene. The winged Cupid holds a crimson heart before the goddess's Venus eyes, while she, with garlands in her lap, reaches down to folds of the gown about her knee. (Howard & Ayers 1978, pp. 330-331)

 

This scene was most likely taken loosely from the same original, probably an European print of which the original has not been identified as a Meissen porcelain painted with "Venus and Cupid". In the British Museum is just such a bowl painted in the workshop of J.F. Metzsch of Bayreuth where a similar Cupid is on the right of Venus and a domed building behind her. (Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. 1, pp. 330-331)

 

Although occasionally identified as Venus and Cupid, the iconography suggests that the two figures are Flora and Zephyr. Wearing a décolleté dress and a blossom in her hair, the goddess of flowers clasps a garland as the winged god of the west wind leans toward her with a single flower in his hand. A popular subject with erotic appeal that is much depicted in Western art, the scene is reminiscent of the courtesans whose excesses were part of the Floralia-a Roman springtime festival. The version shown here could be after an engraving by Benoit Audran ! (1661-1721 copying Antoine Coypel (1661-1722). (Litzenburg 2003, p.191)

 

For an identically decorated teacup, please see:

For similarly decorated objects, please see:

Condition: Two hairlines to the rim.

 

References:

Howard & Ayers 1978, vol.1, cat. 326

New York 1985, lot 204

Hervouët 1986, cat. 13.58

Jörg 1989/2, cat. 75 

Litzenburg 2003, cat. 190

 

Price: € 599 - $ 673 - £ 523

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

More pictures >>

2010821
2010821

Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Mythological and Religious Subjects - Mythological Subjects - Page 1

 

Object 2010821

 

Teacup

 

China

 

1740-1745

 

Height 40 mm (1.58 inch), diameter of rim 75 mm (2.95 inch), diameter of footring 35 mm (1.38 inch), weight 40 grams (1.41 ounce (oz.))

 

Teacup on footring. Polychrome decorated in various overglaze enamels with a mythological scene. The winged Cupid holds a crimson heart before the goddess's Venus eyes, while she, with garlands in her lap, reaches down to folds of the gown about her knee. On the bottom a single flower spray. (Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. 1, pp. 330-331)

 

This scene was most likely taken loosely from the same original, probably an European print of which the original has not been identified as a Meissen porcelain painted with 'Venus and Cupid'. In the British Museum is just such a bowl painted in the workshop of J.F. Metzsch of Bayreuth where a similar Cupid is on the right of Venus and a domed building behind her. (Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. 1, pp. 330-331)

 

Although occasionally identified as Venus and Cupid, the iconography suggests that the two figures are Flora and Zephyr. Wearing a décolleté dress and a blossom in her hair, the goddess of flowers clasps a garland as the winged god of the west wind leans toward her with a single flower in his hand. A popular subject with erotic appeal that is much depicted in Western art, the scene is reminiscent of the courtesans whose excesses were part of the Floralia-a Roman springtime festival. (Litzenburg 2003, p.191)

 

An identically decorated milk jug was sold at:

For similarly decorated objects, please see:

Condition: A hairline with a restored frit to the rim.

 

References:

Howard & Ayers 1978, vol.1, cat. 326

New York 1985, lot 204

Hervouët 1986, cat. 13.58

Jörg 1989/2, cat. 75

Litzenburg 2003, cat. 190

 

Price: € 499 - $ 560 - £ 435

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on their exchange rate to the € price)

 

More pictures >>

 

Mythological and Religious Subjects

 

- Religious Subjects

Currently there are no Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Mythological and Religious Subjects - Religious Subjects objects for sale.

 

Various Subjects 

 

Various Subjects decorated objects are, if available, categorized in the following alphabetical order:

  • Amorous
  • Couples
  • Hunting Scenes
  • Indoor Scenes
  • Meissen Style
  • Outdoor Scenes
  • Various

 

Various Subjects

 

- Amorous

2011987
2011987

Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Various Subjects - Amorous - Page 1

 

Object 2011987

 

Milk jug

 

China

 

1740-1760

 

Height with cover 131 mm (5.16 inch), height without cover 106 mm (4.17 inch), diameter handle to spout 104 mm (4.09 inch), diameter of mouthrim 40 mm (1.57 inch), diameter of footring 40 mm (1.57 inch), weight including cover 213 grams (8.15 ounce (oz.)), weight cover 31 grams (1.09 ounce (oz.))

 

Milk jug on footring, pear shaped body with handle, small triangular spout at the rim. The C-shaped handle is placed opposite the spout. Matching cover with pointed knob. Decorated in various overglaze enamels and gold with the 'The Valentine' or 'Alter of Love' pattern, a landscape scene with two love birds bill affectionately as they perch on Cupid's quiver while his bow lies nearby in the front an altar with two flaming hearts,the scene is flanked by a pine or breadfruit tree and garlanded curtains. Round the rim a scroll-and-shell border. The cover is decorated en suite.

 

According to Motley this is a well known pattern found on a small range of Chinese export pieces. The origins are not clear but it seems to have been done for Lord Anson in 1743 and is based on a drawing by Sir Piercy Brett (c.1710-1781) who was Lieutenant on Anson's flagship HMS Centurion on his voyage round the world. (1740-1744) Anson made Brett captain of the Centurion while they were in Canton, 30 Sept 1743, and he did many drawings of the voyage. The earliest version of this pattern has a breadfruit tree and a palm tree then appear in the centre of an export armorial dinner service with the arms of Anson. In this service the tree has garlands of flowers and many of the elements of this pattern are present: the flaming hearts on the altar, the dog, the shepherd's crook, the birds, the bow and arrows. Sometimes drawn back curtains are added which are very suggestive of an erotic voyeurism, resembling the drapes of a four poster bed. Such use of suggestive array was popular for an eighteenth century audience and would have been readily comprehensible to an educated eighteenth century eye. The use of pastoral imagery and symbolism as code for amorous activities was ubiquitous then. The Valentine design appears on its own in a number of English ceramic wares of the eighteenth century and it was used on Chinese export porcelain, armorial and pseudo-armorial objects as well. (Motley 2014)

 

Howard states that the idea for the Valentine pattern, by Piercy Brett, was certainly inspired by Anson and Piercy's stay on Tenian Island to collect breadfruit trees for the British West Indian colonies. An illustration in Anson's Voyages shows a very similar breadfruit tree an palm while other allusions are to absent loved ones. The Valentine pattern had a popularity which saw it produced in underglaze blue with hounds and puppies and with Chinese-looking shepherds in European clothes seated beneath pine trees. It was copied at Worcester and elements appear on Chinese snuffbottles and rim cartouches for a decade after the Anson's service. It became in fact part of the repertoire of Chinese workshops in Canton. (Howard 1994)

 

The Valentine design remained long in vogue; for in 1778 we still find it described as 'a burning altar, and two small doves on a quiver with a bow, and accessories' in the catalogue of a sale held in that year at Amsterdam of the stock of the porcelain-shop of Martha Raap. (Lunsingh Scheurleer 1974, p.158)

 

For identically, polychrome decorated objects, please see:

 For similarly decorated objects, please see:

Condition: Some popped bubbles of glaze to the tip of the spout and a chip with some frits and fleabites to the rim of the cover. A shallow frit to the footring.

 

References:

Goldsmith Phillips 1956, p.146 & plate 67

Beurdeley 1962,cat. 109

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1974, p.158 & cat. 295

Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. 1, cat. 204, & vol. 2, cat. 355

Hervouët 1986, cat. 7.118 & 7.119

Huitfeldt 1993, p.57 & pp.110-111

Howard 1994, cat. 77-80

Litzenburg 2003, cat. 158

Kerr 2011, pp.65-66 & p.135, nt. 12

Motley 2014, p.82, cat. 61

 

Price: € 1.499 - $ 1.684 - £ 1.308

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

More pictures >>

2011831
2011831

Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Various Subjects - Amorous - Page 1

 

Object 2011831

 

Teacup

 

China

 

1745-1750

 

Height 39 mm (1.53 inch), diameter of rim 74 mm (2.91 inch), diameter of footring 31 mm (1.22 inch), weight 35 grams (1.23 ounce (oz.))

 

Teacup on footring, slightly everted rim. Decorated in encre de Chine, green enamel and gold with a seated young woman with a monkey on her lap. She is dressing him up like a doll. On the rim a border of panels edged in strapwork, floral festoons and foliate-scrolls after an early 18th century laub- und bandelwerk Viennese design. Round the inside rim a single concentric band. 

 

On the, now missing, matching saucer the paw of the animal rests on a small shelf to which it is connected by a long chain, this detail is not portrayed on the teacup probably due to its size. 

 

In 1722 Père d'Entrecolles reported that the Chinese were experimenting with painting in black, so far unsuccessfully. Black or schwarzlot, decoration, was also then just being developed in Europe, and in fact the German Hausmaler was putting it primarily on Chinese imported in the white, rather than on wares from the newly established Meissen factory. It must have been these hybrids that were sent back to Canton for imitation at the time of Père d'Entrecolle's letter, but the perfection of the technique and its translation into commercial export porcelain came only later, under the direct influence of the Du Paquier period (1719-1744). Encre de Chine lent itself perfectly to the copying of Western engravings in thin, black lines. (Jörg & Van Campen 1997, p. 273)

 

Unique to the Viennese Du Paquier porcelain factory was the laub- und bandelwerk border, based on two series of engravings by Paul Decker (d.1713). Continually modified and varied its essential elements were strapwork, palmettes, trelliswork cartouches, and foliate scrolls combined into a rhythmical pattern of baroque formality. Other China trade versions of the laub- und bandelwerk border, such as the more usual one with the addition of peacock and with panels of quilting rather than trellis- or scale work, are farther removed from their Viennese factory prototypes, and are perhaps derived from Hausmaler variants. (Corbeiller 1974, pp.68-69)

 

In European iconography the monkey is a symbol of sexual desire and lust. This decoration therefore had an explicit erotic connotation and in all likelihood an amorous meaning for those who used the tea set. The source of this design which is very rare on Chine de commande, is still unknown. (Jörg 1989/2, p.213

  

For an identically in encre de Chine, green enamel and gold decorated coffee cup and saucer, please see:

For a similarly in encre de Chine, green enamel and gold decorated saucer with a similarly border design, please see:

For a similarly in encre de Chine and various enamels decorated jug, please see:

For other Chine de commande decorated objects using monkeys for an explicit erotic connotation, please see:

Condition: A firing flaw to the rim and three firing flaws to the inner wall.

 

References:

Corbeiller 1974, pp.68-69  

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1980, Abb. 201.

Hervouët 1986, cat. 6.63 & 6.64

Jörg 1989/2, cat. 74 & 83 

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, p. 273

 

Price: € 1.499 - $ 1,684 - £ 1,308

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

More pictures >>

 

Various Subjects

 

- Couples

Currently there are no Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Various Subjects - Couples objects for sale.

 

Various Subjects

 

- Hunting Scenes 

Currently there are no Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Various Subjects - Hunting Scenes for sale.

 

Various Subjects

 

- Indoor Scenes

2011914
2011914

Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Various Subjects - Indoor Scenes - Page 1

 

Object 2011914

 

Saucer

 

China

 

c.1735

 

Height 17 mm (0.67 inch), diameter of rim 118 mm (4.65 inch), diameter of footring 69 mm (2.72 inch), weight 46 grams (1.62 ounce (oz.))

 

Saucer on footring with straight sides and a slightly spreading rim. Decorated in encre de Chine and gold with two European figures wearing Oriental clothes in an Oriental interior with a door. One figure is standing wearing an elaborate robe holding a sprig of coral, the other with a dog on a leash beside a large vase decorated with a monster head (t'au-t'ie). The vase is filled with a sprig of coral, sprays of fungus and peacock feathers. Beside to the vase a wine pot and a pure depiction of an ancient bronze 'Hu', a water jug. On the inside rim a leafy scroll border reserved with flower heads. 

 

Much of the Chine de commande made in the second quarter of the 18th century is decorated in encre de Chine, a grey-black enamel that could be thinly applied and which lent itself to copies of Western engravings and etchings. It is not ink as the French term implies, as ink burns during firing. (Jörg 2002/2, p.149)

 

This scene is interesting because the Chinese painter choose to portrait these two European figures in the symbolism of his own country by placing two large peacock feathers, two coral branches and two fungi in a large vase, the first being a symbol of high rank, the other two stand for longevity. (Lunsingh Scheurleer 1974, p. 222)

 

Spruit states that in her opinion the figures depicted in this scene are "tribute carriers", figures carrying something precious on their way to present the objects to the Emperor and by doing so acknowledging his power. In a museum in Taiwan there is a painting on silk by Yen Li-pên (618-907) on which we can see local rulers with their servants on their way to bring grace to the Emperor. These figures are depicted with exotic hair, clothes and precious objects such as coral, animals and plants. The barefoot servants who carry the objects wear the same slave wrist collars as our little boy (also barefoot). The he-goat is similarly spotted as the dog. Perhaps we can state that Yen Li-pên's painting on silk and this 18th-century decoration are two testimonials of a familiar motif, because they were the "tribute carriers", surely for the 18th-century porcelain decorators. So it seems very likely that the nameless porcelain decorator who decorated this teacup somewhere in a Canton workshop during the mid 18th-century, depicted an image that he could relate to, most likely from images he had seen on prints or in books of 18th-century Chinese "tribute carriers". (Spruit 1967, pp.179-183)

  

  

 

 

 

 

Painting Yen Li-pên

Reproduced from: "Een decor in encre de Chine", L. Spruit in; ANTIEK, II-4, November 1967, pp. 179-183, Chinese Export Porcelain. Chine de Commande, (D.F. Lunsingh Scheurleer, Faber and Faber Limited, London, 1974), p.222, cat. 222.

 

For, previously sold, identically decorated objects, please see:

For identically decorated objects, in encre de Chine or polychrome, please see:

Condition: A fleabite with a short connected hairline to the rim.

 

References:

Williamson 1927 

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1966, cat. 213

Spruit 1967, pp.179-183

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1974, cat. 222

Hervouët 1986, cat. 5.8

London 1990, lot 154

Jörg 2002/2, p.149

 

Price: € 749 - $ 811 - £ 622

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

More pictures >>

2011224
2011224

Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Various Subjects - Indoor Scenes - Page 1

 

Object 2011224

 

Coffee cup

 

China

 

1750-1760

 

Height 65 mm (2.56 inch), diameter of rim 58 mm (2.28 inch), diameter of footring 27 mm (1.06 inch), weight 82 grams (2.89 ounce (oz.))

 

Coffee cup with handle on footring. Decorated in encre de Chine, iron-red and gold with a woman wearing a half-opened nightdress revealing her breasts, hands, buttocks and legs, clipping her toenails while being watched by a servant. in an oval shaped medallion, round the rim a stylised spear-head-pattern border.

 

The decoration on this coffee cup had an explicit erotic connotation for those who used the coffee / tea set. The source of this design on Chine de commande, is still unknown. A very similar design of a naked lady seated in a chair extending her foot towards a tub into which a boy empties a pitcher is, according to Hervouët, after a print by Duflos entitled 'The Bath'. (Jörg 1989/2, p.218

 

Perhaps the 'The Bath' design was made by Duflos as one of a series and the design on this coffee cup was made after another, yet unknown, print from this series.

 

For identically decorated objects, please see:

Condition: A restored chip with a connected (sealed) hairline to the rim.

 

References:

Jansen 1976, cat. 339

Hervouët 1986, cat. 6.38

Jörg 1989/2, p.218

 

Price: € 399 - $ 443 - £ 346

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

More pictures >>

 

Various Subjects

 

- Meissen Style

The maritime commerce scenes on the original Meissen ware were often copied from etchings after Johann Wilhelm Baur (16078-1640). Chinoiseries predominated from quite early on at the Meissen Manufactory, but from about 1730 there was a shift to depicting European settings. (Emden 21015/1, p.101)

2011704B
2011704B

Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Various Subjects - Meissen Style - Page 1

 

Object 2011704E

 

Saucer

 

China

 

1750-1775

 

Height 24 mm (0.95 inch), diameter of rim 121 mm (4.76 inch), diameter of footring 71 mm (2.80 inch), weight 78 grams (2.75 ounce (oz.)

 

Saucer on footring, spreading sides and rim. Decorated in various overglaze enamels, and gold after the style of Meissen porcelain with a European harbour with a large fortress, mountains houses, boats with fisherman and trees. On the quay two men hunting for ducks. On the sides and rim a decorative pattern of scrollwork. The reverse is undecorated.

  

Chine de commande

 

This French expression is used for Chinese porcelain, of which the shape and mainly the decorations are derived from Western examples. Decorations, often European prints (engravings) were cheap and easily brought along by ship to Asia. They were then meticulously copied on order in China, at first in blue and white, but very soon (from approximately 1715 onwards) also in enamel colours. This often-involved porcelain featuring family coats of arms – how fancy this looked on a dinner table – though all kinds of other depictions were also popular. Scenes from the Bible and classical antiquity, depictions of ships, harbours, landscapes as well as city views were all quite common too. Slightly erotic scenes were also much favoured. (The World at Home: Asian porcelain and Delft pottery held from 17 June 2017 to 10 March 2019 at the Groninger Museum, The Netherlands) 

 

The design on this saucer is a direct copy from a Meissen original, including the decorative pattern of scrollwork which is typical of Meissen porcelain of the period 1720-1740. The very detailed and refined painting, so faithfully copying the original, illustrates the craftsmanship of the Chinese porcelain painter and the quality that could be reached in export porcelain. However, Chine de commande, like this must have cost a good deal more than the ordinary enamelled wares for export. (Jörg 1989/2, p.226)

 

For an identically decorated dish, in the collection of the Rijksmuseum Amsterdam please click here.

 

For an identically decorated dish, please see: 

Condition: A glaze firing flaw to the base.

 

References:

Hervouët 1986, 15.20

Jörg 1989/2, cat. 89

The World at Home: Asian porcelain and Delft pottery held from 17 June 2017 to 10 March 2019 at the Groninger Museum, The Netherlands.

 

Price: € 199 - $ 235 - £ 184

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

More pictures >>

 

Various Subjects

 

- Outdoor Scenes

2011671
2011671

Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Various Subjects - Outdoor Scenes - Page 1

 

Object 2011671

 

Dish

 

China

 

c.1750

 

Height 25 mm (0.98 inch), diameter of rim 216 mm (8.50 inch), diameter of footring 121 mm (4.76 inch), weight 302 grams (10.65 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on footring with a flat octagonal shaped underglaze brown-edged rim  (jia mangkou) with indented corners. Decorated in underglaze blue after a Delft tile with an unusual (Dutch) building, a large tree, a seated figure and railings leading down to a river shore with a sampan. The sides are undecorated. On the rim a continuous flower scroll. The reverse is undecorated.  

 

Howard states that the influence of other ceramics on Chinese Export porcelain increased after 1740. Silver and sometimes turned wood, European shapes had been copied from the late 17th Century onwards. In this case it is clear that a Delft tile very similar to the one illustrated was taken to China as a pattern. The Chinese copied the unusual building, the tree behind, the Dutch figure, the railings leading down to the shore - but they added their own river shore on the other bank and a sampan in between to 'balance' the scene. Such new ideas in the trade, where British merchants were concerned, usually developed from the Private Trade. The Dutch, on the other hand, were more adventurous with special designs for large company orders, although these frequently proved expensive". (Howard 1997, p. 59

 

tile

 

(Dutch Delft tile, reproduced from: A Tale of Three Cities Canton, Shanghai & Hong Kong. Three Centuries of Sino-British Trade in the decorative Arts. (D.S. Howard, Sotheby's, London 1997), p.59, cat. 56, not included in this sale/offer)

 

Of this design using the Dutch tile two versions are known, one has the Dutch figure and the sampan, on the other version this Dutch figure has been replaced by two dogs and the sampan has been erased.   

 

For an identically decorated dish, please see:

For an similarly decorated dish with the two dogs and the erased sampan, please see:

2010784 1

 

(Sold Ceramics - Sold Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Various Subjects - Outdoor Scenes - Object 2010784 not included in this sale/offer)

 

Condition: Two fleabites and a frit to the rim.

 

References:

Howard 1997, cat. 56

Sargent 2012, p.183

 

Price: € 699 - $ 785 - £ 610

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

More pictures >>

2011138A
2011138A

Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Various Subjects - Outdoor Scenes - Page 1

 

Object 2011138A

 

Teacup and Saucer

 

China

 

1725-1740

 

Height of teacup 35 mm (1.38 inch), diameter of rim 64 mm (2.52 inch), diameter of footring 32 mm (1.26 inch), weight 24 grams (0.85 ounce (oz.))

Height of saucer 16 mm (0.63 inch), diameter of rim 101 mm (3.98 inch), diameter of footring 50 mm (1.97 inch), weight 36 grams (1.27 ounce (oz.))

 

Teacup and saucer on footrings. Decorated in underglaze blue. In the centre of the saucer, a spray of asters in the upper half of the design, the lower half shows a small house and a separate tall chimney while two partridge-like birds fly in the sky. Around the rim a stylised laurel border. On the reverse three flower sprays. Both teacup and saucer are marked on the base with the symbol mark: Chinese bee, symbol of industry and prosperity, underglaze blue. The teacup is decorated en suite.

 

In the Netherlands this specific design is called koekoek uit ´t huisje or 'cuckoo outside of the cottage'. The origin has never been explained. There are a number of variations and the popularity of the design ensured its reordering over a considerable period. The design is exactly as painted on cups and saucers of c.1695, recovered off the Vung Tau peninsula from the wreck of a Chinese vessel sailing to Batavia. In Sotheby's auction catalogue “Made in Imperial China. 76.000 pieces of Chinese Export Porcelain from the Ca Mau shipwreck, circa 1725. seven teacups and thirty-two saucers identically decorated were sold as the “Garden Pavilion“ pattern and described as “decorated with a small pavilion, its chimney smoking, flanked by birds perched on a giant column and bush, the rim with a stylised laurel pattern border“. Sotheby's adds that the pattern exists in early Meissen. (Lunsingh Scheurleer 1966, p.102), (Howard 1994, p.44), (Amsterdam 2007, p.124, lots 461-462)

 

For identically decorated teacups and saucers, please see:

For an identically decorated dish, please see:

For a similarly decorated sold dish, please see:

Condition teacup: Two fleabites and a tiny shallow rough spot to the rim.

Condition saucer: A few tiny fleabites to the rim, two with a tiny connected hairline.

 

References:

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1966, cat. 141

Frank 1969, p.76.

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1974, cat. 147

Williams 1976, pp.37-38

Hervouët 1986, cat. 10.7

Hartog 1990, cat. 98

Howard 1994, cat. 10

Amsterdam 2007, p.124, lots 461-462

Emden 2015/1, cat. 13

Emden 2015/2, cat. 13

 

Price: € 299 - $ 335 - £ 261

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

More pictures >>