Pater Gratia Oriental Art

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Sold Japanese Imari 1680-1800 

 

Imari with no Underglaze Blue, Iron-red and Gold only

 

Page 1

In category 36 'Coloured Imari with no underglaze blue, iron-red and gold only' of his Japanese export porcelain, Impey states that the implication of this singular restriction of palette, without the use of underglaze blue, is that these may be the product of a single enamelling workshop, but may or may not be the product of a single kiln. The restriction is probably one of choice, for it would hardly be cheaper, if at all, to use a wider range of enamels, and no cheaper to use underglaze blue. (Impey 2002, pp.220-221)

2011948
2011948

Sold Ceramics - Sold Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - Imari with no Underglaze Blue, Iron-red and Gold only - Page 1

 

Object 2011948

 

Teapot

 

Japan

 

1680-1700

 

Height with cover 95 mm (3.74 inch), height without cover 75 mm (2.95 inch), diameter ear to spout 141 mm (5.55 inch), diameter of mouthrim 37 mm (1.46 inch), diameter of footring 37 mm (1.46 inch), weight with cover 159 grams (5.61 ounce (oz.)), weight cover 17 grams (0.60 ounce (oz.))

 

Teapot on footring. Slightly bent spout, C-shaped handle. Domed cover with a round knob. Decorated in iron-red, pink wash and gold with on one side flowering peony plants and on the other side flowering chrysanthemum plants. On the shoulder a border of chrysanthemum petals in low relief alternately decorated with iron-red, pink wash and a floret, around the neck a pointed leaves pattern border.

Round the foot a marubatsu pattern border (modern Japanese for 'naughts and crosses' or 'Os and Xs')

The cover is decorated en suite with similar chrysanthemum petals in low relief. The handle and spout with florets between scrolls.

 

Condition: A fleabite to the inside of the rim of the cover.

 

Reference:

Impey 2002, pp.220-221

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2011456
2011456

Sold Ceramics - Sold Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - Imari with no Underglaze Blue, Iron-red and Gold only - Page 1

 

Object 2011456

 

Miniature garniture

 

Japan

 

1690-1720

 

Height baluster beaker vases 72 mm (2.83 inch) / 69 mm (2.72 inch) / 69 mm (2.72 inch), diameter 34 mm (1.34 inch) / 32 mm (1.26 inch) / 32 mm (1.26 inch), diameter of mouthrim 18 mm (0.71 inch) / 16 mm (0.63 inch) / 18 mm (0.71 inch), diameter of footring 25 mm (0.98 inch) / 21 mm (0.83 inch) / 22 mm (0.87 inch), weight 41 grams (1.45 ounce (oz.)) / 42 grams (1.48 ounce (oz.)) / 46 grams (1.62 ounce (oz.))

Height baluster jars with cover 82 mm (3.23 inch) / 93 mm (3.66 inch), height baluster jars without cover 67 mm (2.64 inch) / 70 mm (2.76 inch), diameter 54 mm (2.13 inch) / 51 mm (2.01 inch), diameter of mouthrim 31 mm (1.22 inch) / 29 mm (1.14 inch), diameter of footring 31 mm (1.22 inch) / 29 mm (1.14 inch), weight 98 grams (3.46 ounce (oz.)) / 96 grams (3.39 ounce (oz.))

 

Miniature garniture consisiting of two covered baluster jars and three baluster beaker vases on footrings. The oviform jars with wide, upright necks. Domed covers and pointed knobs (one knob has fallen sideways during the firing process). All with a takefushi shaped foot and decorated in overglaze iron-red and gold with flowering carnation alternating with a clump of flowering daisies. Round the necks pointed leaves-pattern borders. The covers are decorated en suite.

 

Porcelain miniatures were popular in The Netherlands, where they were used to furnish doll's houses, which were not children's playthings but professionally furnished replicas of townhouses. In general, miniatures were included in groups of decorative porcelain placed on shelves, brackets and consoles in the Dutch interior, or in the porcelain rooms of the grand houses, such as those still in Pommersfelden and Charlottenburg. Germany. (Jörg 2003/1, p.190)

 

For a similarly decorated miniature salt and chamber-pot, please see:

Condition:

Covered baluster vases: A firing flaw to a pointed knob. A fleabite to a rim and a chip to an inner rim.

Baluster beaker vases: Some firing flaws. A chip and a fleabite to a rim, an tiny glaze hairline and a "S"-shaped glaze hairline to a rim.  

 

References:

Jörg & Flecker 2001, pp.50-52

Impey 2002, pp.220-221

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 191, 193 & 238

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2011285-2
2011285-2

Sold Ceramics - Sold Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - Imari with no Underglaze Blue, Iron-red and Gold only - Page 1

 

Object 2011285-2

 

Miniature dish 

 

Japan

 

c.1700

 

Height 10 mm (0.39 inch), diameter of rim 65 mm (2.56 inch), diameter of footring 28 mm (1.10 inch)

 

Miniature dish on footring, wide flat rim. Decorated in overglaze iron-red and gold with a  two flower sprays. The reverse is undecorated.

 

This miniature dish, most likely, part of a miniature table ware comprising set. It would have been ordered as Japon de commande by special request.

 

Pardue states that miniature objects like these were most likely part of a larger set for the domestic (i.e., preparing food & serving it) education of children, primarily females. On the other hand, an adult lady could have employed it if she were interested in dolls and miniature things. (Pardue 2008, pp.49-58)

 

For a similarly decorated miniature ewer, most likely a part from the same miniature table ware comprising set, please see:

For a similarly decorated miniature salt and chamber-pot, please see:

Condition: A fleabite to the rim.

 

References:

Impey 2002, pp.220-221

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 191, 193, 214 & 238

Pardue 2008, pp.49-58

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2011285-1
2011285-1

Sold Ceramics - Sold Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - Imari with no Underglaze Blue, Iron-red and Gold only - Page 1

 

Object 2011285-1

 

Miniature ewer 

 

Japan

 

c.1700

 

Height 52 mm (2.04 inch), diameter 42 mm (1.65 inch), diameter of mouthrim 23 mm (0.91 inch), diameter of footring 26 mm (1.02 inch)

 

Miniature, pear-shaped ewer on footring, side loop handle and triangular spout set at right angles, Decorated in overglaze iron-red and gold with a flowering chrysanthemum and peony spray flanking a initialled 'O' for the Dutch word olie or oil. On the handle leafy scrolls.

 

A specific group of ewers is decorated with the letters 'O'', 'A', or 'S' indicating their contents: 'O' stands for olie (oil), 'A' for azijn (vinegar), 'L' for limoen (lemon), the 'S' or 'Z' for soya or zoja (soy). They were used at the dinner table in The Netherlands. (Jörg 2003/1, p.176Arts adds the letter 'C' for conserven (?) (preserves). (Arts 1983, p.50) This ewer was made following a European glass or silver original and was, most likely, part of a cruet comprising set.

 

This miniature condiment jug was, most likely, part of a miniature table ware comprising set. It would have been ordered as Japon de commande by special request.

  

Pardue states that miniature objects like these were most likely part of a larger set for the domestic (i.e., preparing food & serving it) education of children, primarily females. On the other hand, an adult lady could have employed it if she were interested in dolls and miniature things. (Pardue 2008, pp.49-58)

 

For a similarly decorated miniature dish, most likely a part from the same miniature table ware comprising set, please see:

For a similarly decorated miniature salt and chamber-pot, please see:

Condition: Perfect.

 

References:

Arts 1983, Plate 22

Impey 2002, pp.220-221

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 191, 193, 214 & 238

Pardue 2008, pp.49-58

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2010790
2010790

Sold Ceramics - Sold Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - Imari with no Underglaze Blue, Iron-red and Gold only - Page 1

 

Object 2010790

 

Miniature, possibly apothecary, bottle

 

Japan

 

1690-1720

 

Height 57 mm (2.24 inch), diameter 35 mm (1.38 inch), diameter of mouthrim 8 mm (0.32 inch), diameter of footring 23 mm (0.91 inch), weight 36 grams (1.27 ounce (oz.))

 

Miniature, possibly apothecary, oviform bottle on footring, tapering neck with a horizontal rib. Flanged mouthrim. Imari decorated in overglaze iron-red and gold with two flowering chrysanthemum sprays. Above the ribbed neck a pointed leaves pattern border.

 

The use of this miniature, possibly apothecary bottle is unknown, It is too large to be placed in a doll's house. It may have been solely for decorative purposes. (Jörg 2003/1, p.165)

 

In O. Impey's "Japanese Export Porcelain. Catalogue of the Collection of the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford", Category 36, is devoted to coloured Imari with no underglaze blue, red and gold only. The implication of this singular restriction of palette, without the use of underglaze blue, is that these may be the product of a single enamelling workshop, but may or may not be the product of a single kiln. The restriction is probably one of choice, for it would hardly be cheaper, if at all, to use a wider range of enamels, and no cheaper to use underglaze blue. (Impey 2002, pp.220-221)

 

Condition: A frit and three fleabites to the mouthrim and a firing flaw to the waist and neck.

 

References:

Impey 2002, pp.220-221

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 191, 193 & 238

 

Price: Sold.

 

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