Pater Gratia Oriental Art

Sold Ceramics

 

Sold Chinese Imari 1700-1800

 

Tea, Coffee and Chocolate wares

 

Page 2

Chinese porcelain producers developed new types of decorations in the early 18th century, Chinese Imari being one of them. It is characterised by a combination of underglaze blue and overglaze red and gold. Details are sometimes in black and green enamels. This development was a reaction to the success of Japanese Imari porcelain with a similar colour scheme. Sometimes Chinese imitations are direct copies of Japanese examples but more often Chinese Imari is decorated with typical Chinese motifs that are closely related to the underglaze-blue patterns of the period. However, the use of red and gold makes Chinese Imari more lavish. Landscapes, flowering plants, birds and mythical creatures are recurring motifs. Depictions of humans are less frequent and apart from armorial pieces, European designs are quite rare. The shapes fit into the normal export assortment. Chinese Imari was not only in demand in the West, but also in south-east Asia, India, and the Ottoman Empire. In the VOC (Dutch East India Company, 1602–1799) records it is called 'Chinese-Japanese' and in addition to blue and white and enamelled wares, this was a standard type in the Company's assortment that was bought in Canton until the end of the 18th century.

2012070
2012070

Sold Ceramics - Sold Chinese Imari 1700-1800 - Tea, Coffee and Chocolate wares - Page 2

 

Object 2012070

 

Teapot

 

China

 

1700-1720

 

Height including the cover 90 mm (3.54 inch), diameter handle to spout 105 mm (4.13 inch), diameter of mouthrim 27 mm (1.06 inch), diameter of footring 33 mm (1.30 inch), weight with cover 140 grams (4.94 ounce (oz.)), weight cover 11 grams (0.39 ounce (oz.))

 

Teapot on footring, the body of elongated barrel shape, a straight spout and C-shaped handle. domed flat cover with a round knob. Chinese Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, overglaze iron-red and gold on both sides with a shaped panel filled with two cockerels facing each other separated by a flowering plant growing from a taihu (garden) rock. On the handle, the spout and In between both panels, just under the spout, a single flower spray. The cover is decorated with a flower spray and a single butterfly.

 

The motif of cockerels was popular on ko-akae and ko-sometsuke. The cock represents yang, the masculine principle, and a pair of fighting cocks symbolises courage and martial spirt. Bottles with this design have been found in tombs dated to 1628 and 1634. (Jörg 2011/2, p.17, cat. 6 & 7)

 

For other objects decorated with two cockerels facing each other, please see:

For a Chinese teapot similarly decorated with two cockerels, please see:

Japanese Imari was exported to Europe from the last quarter of the 17th century by the Dutch. The Chinese began copying Imari porcelain - far more cheaply, just as adeptly and in an ever larger range of shapes - in the early 18th century. The early 18th century has left little written documentary evidence of Chinese Imari. It was often entered as Japanese in inventories such as those drawn up at Dresden, whilst in shipping lists it was not described in sufficient detail to be identified. Dutch private traders began importing enormous quantities of imari of around 1720. Their shapes were likewise often geared towards European source material in silver, stoneware or glass. (Düsseldorf 2015, pp.222-223)

 

Conditions: 

Teapot: Some popped bubbles of glaze, caused by the firing process, and a glaze chip to the handle.

Cover: Various chips to the rim.

 

References:

Jörg 2011/2, cat. 6 & 7

Düsseldorf 2015, pp.222-223 & cat.126

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2010728
2010728

Sold Ceramics - Sold Chinese Imari 1700-1800 - Tea, Coffee and Chocolate wares - Page 2

 

Object 2010728

 

Milk jug

 

China

 

1710-1720

 

Height including the cover 135 mm (5.31 inch), diameter 92 mm (3.62 inch), diameter of mouthrim 52 mm, (2.05 inch), diameter of footring 48 mm (1.89 inch), weight with cover 270 grams (9.52 ounce (oz.)), weight cover 43 grams (1.52 ounce (oz.))

 

Milk jug on footring, pear shaped body with handle, small triangular spout at the rim. The C-shaped handle is placed opposite the spout. Domed cover with round knob. Chinese Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, overglaze iron-red and gold with various flowering plants. Round the mouthrim and the rim of the cover a zig-zag lines pattern border with half flower-heads. On the handle a single flowering stem. The cover has been pierced.

 

For an identically shaped and decorated milk jug, please see:

Condition: Two tiny fleabites to the tip of the spout and some spots of popped bubbles of glaze to the handle, caused during the firing process.

 

Reference:

Museum De Lakenhal, inv.nr. B 371

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2011383
2011383

Sold Ceramics - Sold Chinese Imari 1700-1800 - Tea, Coffee and Chocolate wares - Page 2

 

Object 2011383

 

Teapot

 

China

 

1700-1720

 

Height 106 mm (4.17 inch), diameter ear to spout 141 mm (5.55 inch), diameter of mouthrim 51 mm (2.01 inch), diameter of footring 51 mm (2.01 inch)

 

Teapot on footring, ribbed body and cover, straight spout and C-shaped handle. Domed cover with round knob. Chinese Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, overglaze iron-red and gold with flowering chrysanthemum plants growing from pierced rockwork, on the reverse side flowering peony plants also growing from pierced rockwork. Around the neck and top of the cover a lotus shaped panel border in relief filled with flower heads. On the cover two flower sprays, on the handle and spout, single flowering stems.

 

Condition: Two tiny fleabites to the tip of the spout, a chip to the inside of the mouthrim and some very tiny spots on the rim of the cover, caused by popping bubbles of glaze during the firing process.

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2010235
2010235

Sold Ceramics - Sold Chinese Imari 1700-1800 - Tea, Coffee and Chocolate wares - Page 2

 

Object 2010235

 

Coffee cup

China

1720-1750

 

Height 73 mm (3.50 inch), diameter of rim 70 mm (2.36 inch), diameter of footring 34 mm (1.38 inch)

 

Coffee cup with handle on footring with an underglaze brown-edged rim (jia mangkou). Chinese Imari decorated in underglaze blue, iron-red and gold. On the cylindrical wall two medallions filled with flowering plants behind a fence, in between the medallions branches of flowering plants.

 

Condition: A chip to the rim and a frit to the inner footring

 

References:

Jörg 1982/1, fig. 46

Jörg 1986/1, fig. 56

Sargent 2012, p.183

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2011040
2011040

Sold Ceramics - Sold Chinese Imari 1700-1800 - Tea, Coffee and Chocolate wares - Page 2

 

Object 2011040

 

Tea caddy

 

China

 

1720-1730 

 

Height with silver mounts 147 mm (5.78 inch), height base to shoulder 85 mm (3.35 inch), dimensions 53 mm (2.09 inch) x 91 mm (3.58 inch)

 

Tea caddy of rectangular form with canted corners and flat shoulder with a short upright neck. The edge in underglaze light brown (jia mangkou). Unglazed base. The original cover is missing en replaced by Dutch silver mounts (marked). Chinese Imari decorated in underglaze blue and overglaze iron-red and gold with on the sides and top with a continuous riverscape with pagodas, trees, mountains and clouds. The silver marks explained: the marker’s mark: J3, the sword mark was used (1814-1905) as the standard mark on articles too small for the full hallmarking.

 

Condition: Some very tiny glaze frits to the edges.

 

Reference:

Sargent 2012, p.183

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2012029
2012029

Sold Ceramics - Sold Chinese Imari 1700-1800 - Tea, Coffee and Chocolate wares - Page 2

 

Object 2012029

 

Teapot

 

China

 

1710-1730

 

Height with cover 127 mm (5.00 inch), height without cover 92 mm (3.62 inch), diameter handle to spout 182 mm (7.17 inch), diameter of mouthrim 58 mm (2.28 inch), diameter of footring 55 mm (2.17 inch), weight with cover 485 grams (17.11 ounce (oz.)), weight cover 87 grams (3.07 ounce (oz.))

 

A ribbed teapot and cover of globular shape on footring. Straight spout with a curved C-shaped handle. Domed cover with a pointed knob. On the spout fitted with an unmarked silver mount. The edge of the cover in underglaze brown (jia mangkou). Chinese Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, overglaze iron-red, and gold. On the body on both sides two fan-shaped reserves filled with a bird perched on a flowering prunus branch flanked by two groups of flowering plants. Under the spout and in between the handle two small round reserves filled with a single flower spray. Around the neck florets between scrolls. The cover is similarly decorated with two large reserves containing a bird perched on a flowering prunus branch and two small round reserves filled with a single flower spray. In between the panels a flower spray, On the handle and spout flower sprays.

 

An identical teapot can be found in the collection of the Jan Menze van Diepen Foundation at Slochteren, the Netherlands (JMD-P-0850)

 

For a similarly shaped and identically decorated teapot, please see:

Condition: A firing tension hairline to the handle and a restored finial. 

 

References:

Sargent 2012, p.183

lakenhal.nl, inv.nr. B 366

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2011420
2011420

Sold Ceramics - Sold Chinese Imari 1700-1800 - Tea, Coffee and Chocolate wares - Page 2

 

Object 2011420

 

Tea caddy

China

1710-1730

 

Height with cover 114 mm (4.48 inch), height without cover 98 mm (3.86 inch), dimensions 90 mm (3.54 inch) x 56 mm (2.20 inch), diameter of mouthrim 25 mm (0.98 inch), weight with cover 274 grams (9.67 ounce (oz.)), weight cover 13 grams (0.46 ounce (oz.))

Tea-caddy of rectangular form with canted corners, a flat shoulder with a upright unglazed neck. The original cover is missing and replaced with a contemporary mahogany version. The flat base is unglazed. Chinese Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, overglaze iron-red, and gold. cover. On the body and the flat shoulders decorated with various flowering plants. Round the foot, shoulder and neck a meander pattern border.

 

For an identically shaped and decorated tea caddy, please see:

Condition: Two chips and glaze rough spots on various edges.

 

Reference:

Suchomel 2015, cat. 227

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2010713
2010713

Sold Ceramics - Sold Chinese Imari 1700-1800 - Tea, Coffee and Chocolate wares - Page 2

 

Object 2010713

 

Miniature teapot

 

China

 

c.1740

 

Height 67 mm (2.64 inch), diameter handle to spout 102 mm (4.02 inch), diameter of mouthrim 35 mm (1.38 inch), diameter of footring 32 mm (1.26 inch)

 

Miniature teapot on footring, straight spout and C-shaped handle. domed low cover with a round knob. Chinese Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, overglaze iron-red and gold one side with two cockerels facing each other separated by a flowering plant growing from a taihu (garden) rock, on the other side with a single plant. On the spout and handle sprays of florets between scrolls. A banana plant covers almost the entire cover.

 

The motif of cockerels was popular on ko-akae and ko-sometsuke. The cock represents yang, the masculine principle, and a pair of fighting cocks symbolises courage and martial spirt. Bottles with this design have been found in tombs dated to 1628 and 1634. (Jörg 2011/2, p.17, cat. 6 & 7)

 

For other objects decorated with two cockerels facing each other, please see:

This teapot was most likely part of a child's tea set. These toy tea sets were indeed used by children for entertaining guests at tea parties as a common element of their socialization training. Such occasions, however, would have been held under the supervision of adults. (Pardue 2008, p.2)

 

Condition: A firing flaw to the footring and a frit to the inner mouthrim.

 

References:

Pardue 2008, p.2

Jörg 2011/2, cat. 6 & 7

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2010115
2010115
Sold Ceramics - Sold Chinese Imari 1700-1800 - Tea, Coffee and Chocolate wares - Page 2

 

Object 2010115

 

Tea caddy

 

China

 

1700-1720

 

Height with cover 105 mm (4.13 inch), dimensions 75 mm (2.95 inch) x 60 mm (2.36 inch)

 

Tea caddy of moulded fan-shaped form. On the flat shoulder an unglazed cylindrical mouth with a lid fitting (original) cover. The base is unglazed. Chinese Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, overglaze iron-red and gold in low relief with four moulded panels, one with a garden wall, a porch and a window, in low relief, flowering plants and a pine-tree, two with a pavilion on a shore in a river scape in low relief and one with a bridge between two pieces of land and large rockwork with flowering plants in low relief. On the flat shoulder the unglazed cylindrical mouth is flanked by flowering plants. On the side of the cover two flowering branches and on top a pavilion near a shore with mountains in the background.

 

Only grown in China and Japan during the 17th Century, tea became known in the Netherlands early because the Dutch East India Company (VOC) shipped small quantities home. Its use as a beverage was established slowly, and was probably started by retired VOC employees who had become accustomed to drinking tea in the East. At a tea party, the expensive beverage was served in small teapots, one for each guest, filled with the leaves of the type he or she preferred. The tea was poured into small cups, while the teapot was refilled with hot water from a metal or sometimes ceramic kettle. (Jörg 2011/2, p.131)

 

Judging from its shape this tea caddy was once part of a set of seven with one centre piece surrounded by six others and probably on a matching tray. These seven individual tea caddies were filled with various blends so each tea drinker could choose the type he or she preferred.  Such a complete must have been regarded as luxury tea wares for the upper classes.

 

Condition: Some glaze fritting to two side edges.

 

Reference:

Jörg 2011/2, p.131

 

Price: Sold.

 

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