Pater Gratia Oriental Art

Sold Ceramics

 

Sold Japanese Imari 1690-1800

 

Tableware and other Porcelain with Western Shapes  

  

Page 1

2011850
2011850

Sold Ceramics - Sold Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - Tableware and other Porcelain with Western Shapes - Page 1

 

Object 2011850

 

Bottle

 

Japan

 

c.1700

 

Height with cover 260 mm (10.23 inch), height without cover 216 mm (8.50 inch), dimensions base 85 mm (3.35 inch) x 85 mm (3.35 inch), dimensions shoulder 96 mm (3.77 inch) x 100 mm (3.93 inch), diameter of mouthrim 25 mm (0.98 inch), weight with cover 837 grams (29.52 ounce (oz.)), weight cover 27 grams (0.95 ounce (oz.))

  

Square bottle on unglazed base, flaring slightly to the shallow domed shoulder. The shoulder slopes up to smaller square with a short central narrowing neck which flares at the base and top. An unglazed cylindrical mouth with a glazed rim. The original cover is missing and replaced by a gold plated silver cap. Imari, decorated in iron-red, gold, a pink gold-wash and oxidised silver. The sides with two panels a square lower panel with moulded basket work in low relief and a rectangular upper panel with the moulded chrysanthemum flower heads in low relief surrounded by scattered flowerheads. The panels are surrounded by black floral sprays (oxidised silver). On the shoulder two parts (six and nine petals) of a stylized chrysanthemum crest, (kiku no mon), drawn with double iron- red outline and filled with gold. The petals are decorated in iron-red, gold and a pink gold-wash, alternately filled with a swastika diaper pattern and a floral scroll. On the neck a lappet pattern border. On the base a rectangular paper label that reads: 'Nico a_18'  

 

The shape of this bottle derived from a Dutch glass ginn bottle and is also found in Chinese export porcelain of the early 17th century. Unlike earthenware, Japanese and Chinese porcelain was not porous, and such bottles had a number of uses in Europe such as for spirits and oils.The bottle could have been used in Japan as a toguri, a sake bottle. The low relief basket work of the lower panels could very well be an imitation of a braided wicker casing that was bound / tied around the original Dutch glass bottle which served as the model, to protect it from breaking. (Ayers, Impey & Mallet 1990, p.108 cat. 56), (Howard 1994, p.204), (Jörg 2003/1, p.60)

 

For a similarly shaped bottle with basket work in low relief in the lower panels, please see:

For similarly decorated objects with moulded flower heads in low relief, please see:

Condition: Two short hairlines and a chip to the mouthrim. A Y-shaped hairline to one side.

 

References:

Ayers, Impey & Mallet 1990, cat. 56

Howard 1994, p.204 

Impey 2002, cat. 357

Jörg 2003/1, p.60 & cat. 99 & 100

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2011760
2011760

Sold Ceramics - Sold Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - Tableware and other Porcelain with Western Shapes - Page 1

 

Object 2011760

 

Salt

 

Japan

 

c.1700

 

Height 68 mm (2.68 inch), diameter concave scale 45 mm (1.77 inch), diameter foot 90 mm (3.54 inch), weight 152 grams (5.36 ounce (oz.))

 

Exhibited: The Asian Galleries Reinmagined - Color Across Asia held from 21 December 2016 to 13 May 2018 at the Ackland Art Museum, The University of North Carolina at Chaphil Hill, The United States of America, Object Guide no. 68.

  

Salt, the high, domed open body on three small ball feet. The neck widening into a broad rim tapering to the slightly concave top. Imari, decorated in overglaze iron-red, green, aubergine enamels and gold. The lower part with moulded panels shaped as lotus petals in low relief, filled with carnation and prunus sprays. On the neck a zig-zag lines pattern border  and three flowering prunus sprays. The shoulder with flowerheads alternating with foliate scrolls. On top, inside the scale, a flowering carnation spray. (Jörg 2003/1, p.164)

 

Jörg compares a pair of similarly shaped and Imari decorated Japanese salts with a underglaze blue Chinese Kangxi salt. These Japanese salts are a close copy of the underglaze blue Chinese salt similarly shaped and moulded with lotus-leaf panels and dating to c.1700. Such Chinese Kangxi salts were based, in turn on Dutch ceramic models. Because of the decoration, which does not occur on Dutch salts, it can be stated that the Japanese piece was not copied directly from a Dutch model but from a Chinese example and consequently dates to c.1700. So its shape was copied from a Dutch ceramic original. In turn it was used as a model after which the Japanese salts were made. (Jörg 2003/1, p.164)

 

20114412011760

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                 A comparison between the Japanese Imari salt (2011760) and an earlier sold Chinese Kangxi salt (2011441). In shape and decoration this Chinese salt is even closer to the Japanese salt than the Chinese Kangxi example Jörg uses in his comparison.

 

In both moulding and colouring this salt was inspired by, or ancestral to Chinese famille verte wares of the Kangxi period. It may be assumed to precede composite condiment sets in the more developed 'Imari style'. which were in Europe before 1721. Japanese salt-cellars were, (according to T. Volker), first exported in 1669. (Ayers, Impey & Mallet 1990, p.206) 

 

The material and the Chinese style decoration made this salt an exotic object that was prominently placed on a richly laid table. At this time salts were ordered separately, and only much later as part of a dinner service. With many Christian connotations, salt was an important seasoning at dinner before the 19th century and salts were larger and more elaborate than they are today. (Jörg 2011/2, p.148)

 

For identically shaped and decorated salts, please see;

Condition: All three feet restored.

 

References:

Oxford 1981, cat. 221

Ayers, Impey & Mallet 1990, cat. 202

Suchomel 1997, cat. 91

Arita 2000, cat. 118  

Impey 2002, cat. 308

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 187

Jörg 2011/2, cat. 142

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2011856
2011856

Sold Ceramics - Sold Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - Tableware and other Porcelain with Western Shapes - Page 1

 

Object 2011856

 

Bottle

 

Japan

 

1700-1720

 

Height 212 mm (8.35 inch), dimensions base 85 mm (3.35 inch) x 85 mm (3.35 inch), dimensions shoulder 97 mm (3.82 inch) x 98 mm (3.86 inch), diameter of mouthrim 35 mm (1.38 inch)

  

Square bottle on unglazed base, flaring slightly to the shallow domed shoulder. The shoulder slopes up to smaller square with a short central narrowing neck which flares at the base and top. Restorations in gold lacquer on the mouthrim. Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, iron-red, green and black enamel and gold. On the sides scholars standing in a mountainous landscape reserved on an iron-red ground with floral scrolls. Round the foot and on the shoulder floral scrolls in gold on an underglaze blue ground. On the base of the neck floral scrolls and round its foot a pointed leaves pattern border in gold on an underglaze blue ground. Around the neck floral scrolls.

 

The shape of this bottle derived from a Dutch glass ginn bottle and is also found in Chinese export porcelain of the early 17th century. Unlike earthenware, Japanese and Chinese porcelain was not porous, and such bottles had a number of uses in Europe such as for spirits and oils. The bottle could have been used in Japan as a toguri, a sake bottle.  (Ayers, Impey & Mallet 1990, p.108 cat. 56, Howard 1994, p.204), (Jörg 2003/1, p.60)

 

For identically shaped and similarly decorated bottles, please see:

For a similarly shaped and decorated pair of bottles, please see:

Interestingly, this bottle has an old original Japanese gold lacquer restoration which could indicate it was used as such in Japan. Kintsugi (金継ぎ) (Japanese: golden joinery) or Kintsukuroi (金繕い) (Japanese: golden repair) is the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with lacquer dusted or mixed with powdered gold, silver, or platinum, a method similar to the maki-e technique. As a philosophy it treats breakage and repair as part of the history of an object, rather than something to disguise. (source: wikipedia.org/wiki/Kintsugi

 

For some examples of objects with gold lacquer restorations, please see:

Condition: A short hairline and restorations in gold lacquer to the mouthrim.

 

References:

Ayers, Impey & Mallet 1990, cat. 56 & 222

Howard 1994, p.204 

Suchomel 1997, cat. 151, 172

Kyushu 2003, cat. 2702, 2754 & 3198

Jörg 2003/1, p.60 & cat. 39, 99 & 100

wikipedia.org/wiki/Kintsugi

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2010505
2010505

Sold Ceramics - Sold Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - Tableware and other Porcelain with Western Shapes - Page 1

 

Object 2010505

 

Milk bowl

 

Japan

1700-1730

 

Height 70 mm (2.76 inch), diameter of rim 164 mm (6.46 inch), diameter of footring 62 mm (2.44 inch)

 

Milk bowl with near vertical sides pinched spout at the top, short flat rim, upturned edge with two arched handles. On the base a firing ring, and three conical feet. Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, iron-red and gold  On the bottom a jardinière filled with flowers including chrysanthemum and peony on a terrace. On the rim four flower sprays including chrysanthemum and peony. The reverse is undecorated. Marked on the base with a, most likely, shop or painters mark in underglaze blue.

 

Such bowls, imitating a Dutch earthenware model, were used to pour the cream off the milk. They seem to be quite rare. (Jörg 2003/1, p.176)

 

For a similarly shaped and decorated milk bowl, please see:

For an identically shaped and decorated only in underglaze blue milk bowl, please see:

Condition: A tiny glaze frit to the rim.

 

References:

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1971, cat. 187

Daendels 1981, cat. 117

Rotterdam 1986, cat. 72

Jörg 2003/1, cat..212, 213 & 213a

 

Price: Sold.

 

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201037
201037

Sold Ceramics - Sold Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - Tableware and other Porcelain with Western Shapes - Page 1

 

Object 201037

 

Mustard pot

 

Japan

 

1700-1730

 

Height with cover 124 mm (4.84 inch), height without cover 104 mm (4.09 inch), height cover 32 mm (1.26 inch), diameter mouthrim mustard pot 40 mm (1.57 inch), diameter of footring 51 mm (2.01 inch), diameter mouthrim cover 14 mm (0.55 inch), weight including cover 269 grams (9.49 ounce (oz.)), weight cover 31 grams (1.09 ounce (oz.))

 

Mustard pot of baluster shape with a spreading foot and a partially glazed, sunked in, base. Curved C-shaped handle. Wide mouth and a shallow domed cover with a central open ring knob for a wooden spoon. Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, overglaze iron-red and gold. On the foot a decoration of chrysanthemum and peony branches, around the waist a lotus leaves border and on the body two panels reserved on a ground of chrysanthemum and peony flowers scrolls, one panel is decorated with a flowering chrysanthemum plant the other with a flowering peony plant. On the shoulder scrolls of flowering chrysanthemum. The open cover is similar decorated with two panels reserved on a ground of chrysanthemum and peony flowers scrolls, one panel is decorated with chrysanthemum the other with peony flowers,

 

Mustard was extremely popular in The Netherlands where it was used to improve the taste of food and was made locally. It was not well homogenised yet, and had to be stirred before use. Small (wooden) spoons came with the pots, which consequently have either a round opening in the cover (as here) or an opening in the mouthrim. (Jörg 2003/1, p.162)

 

For an identically shaped mustard pot, please see:

Condition: Perfect.

 

References:

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1977, cat. 181

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 184

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2010141
2010141

Sold Ceramics - Sold Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - Tableware and other Porcelain with Western Shapes - Page 1

 

Object 2010141

 

Shaving bowl

 

Japan

 

1700-1730

 

Height 75 mm (2.95 inch), diameter of rim 275 mm (10.83 inch), diameter of footring 110 mm (4.33 inch)

 

Shaving bowl on footring, spreading flat, underglaze brown-edged rim (jia mangkou), a saved semicircular section and two small holes on the rim opposite the cut-out section. Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, iron-red and gold with a jardinière on a veranda filled with flowering peonies. On the rim panels filled with a riverscape on an underglaze blue ground with double chrysanthemum flower heads. On the reverse two wide spread flowering prunus sprays. 

 

Shaving bowls were used by barbers and were indispensable in the Dutch household too. They were made of earthenware, pewter, copper and even silver. They had an alternative use, namely to let blood from a vein in the arm during blood-letting, a medical procedure thought to drain bad blood from the system also performed by the barber/surgeon. In the seventeenth century, regulations were put in place in England to govern what barbers were permitted to do. Thus the became confined to bloodletting and treating external diseases. In Prussia the barbers' and the surgeons' guild joined in 1779, and it was said of great Prussian surgeons that they had risen "up from the barber's bowl'. Both purposes explain the semicircular saving. The two holes are for a cord used to suspend it from the client's neck to catch lather and water during shaving, or to hang the bowl on the wall thus implying that owners also appreciated the bowl for its decorative value as well as its function. Chinese shaving bowls usually have the holes in the footring while Japanese examples have them in the rim. (Jörg 2003/1, p.184), (Sargent 2012, p.189)

 

This shaving bowl was acquired from the son of a barber who lived and worked in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. He told me his father acquired this shaving bowl from Chinese sailor men who paid him with it for his services. His father had this shaving bowl hanging on the wall of his barbershop in the centre of Rotterdam. For some reason he took it home with him on the May 13th, 1940 this was the night before the massive bombing and wipe out of a large part of the Rotterdam's inner city by the German Luftwaffe on May 14th, 1940.

 

Condition : Perfect.

 

References:

Jörg 2003/1, p.184

Sargent 2012, p.183 & p.189

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2011845
2011845

Sold Ceramics - Sold Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - Tableware and other Porcelain with Western Shapes - Page 1

 

Object 2011845

 

Cuspidor

 

Japan

 

1700-1730

 

Height 38 mm (1.49 inch), diameter of rim 197 mm (7.76 inch), diameter of footring 135 mm (5.31 inch), weight 431 grams (15.20 ounce (oz.))

 

Cuspidor on footring. Globular body with curved handle. Very short narrow neck, the upper part shaped as a bowl with wide flaring sides. Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, iron-red and gold. On the body two flower sprays, inside the upper part a gnarled blossoming cherry branch. The reverse is undecorated. (Jörg 2003/1, p.167, cat. 195)

 

Cuspidors were indispensable in the interior especially in the East Indies where both tobacco and betel nuts were chewed. Volker mentions Japanese porcelain and copper cuspidors in the lodges of the merchants on Deshima for 1701 and 1702. Dutch metal or earthenware cuspidors will have served as models, although the same shape has been known in Chinese ceramics since the Tang period, serving as a vase for a lotus flower. Interestingly, the VOC documents make no mention of Company shipments or orders for cuspidors, and they must therefore have been shipped privately. (Volker 1959, pp.28-29)

 

For an identically shaped and decorated Cuspidor, please see;

Condition: A tiny firing flaw to the rim.

 

References:

Volker 1959, pp.28-29

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 195 

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2010660A
2010660A

Sold Ceramics - Sold Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - Tableware and other Porcelain with Western Shapes - Page 1

 

Object 2010660A

 

Ewer

 

Japan

 

1700-1730

 

Height 105 mm (4.13 inch), diameter of belly 81 mm (3.19 inch), diameter of mouthrim 32 mm (1.26 inch), diameter of footring 44 mm (1.73 inch), weight 184 grams (6.49 ounce (oz.))

 

Oviform ewer on footring, wide neck with pinched spout. Curved pierced handle placed at an angle to the spout. Imari,decorated in underglaze blue, iron-red and gold with flowering chrysanthemum and peony plants, On the handle a floret between scrolls. 

 

The piercing on the handles of this and similar shapes is original, and was intended for the silver or other metal mount that would customarily have been added in Europe. 

 

Condition: Two firing flaws.

 

Price: Sold.

 

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More pictures of object 2010470, another identically shaped, sized and decorated, sold ewer >>

2011817
2011817

Sold Ceramics - Sold Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - Tableware and other Porcelain with Western Shapes - Page 1

 

Object 2011817

 

Shaving bowl

 

Japan

 

1700-1730

 

Height 69 mm (2.71 inch), diameter of rim 275 mm (10.83 inch), diameter of footring 118 mm (4.65 inch), weight 846 grams (29.84 ounce (oz.))

 

Shaving bowl on footring with a spreading flat rim, in it a saved semi-circular section below and two small glazed holes opposite the cut-out section of the rim. On the base one large spur, its cone still intact. Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, overglaze iron-red and gold in the centre with a fence, behind it a large flowering chrysanthemum (kiku) and peony (momo). On the rim large petal shaped cartouches filled with flowers. On the reverse two wide spread flowering prunus sprays. Three circles around the foot, one on the base.

 

The first documentary evidence for scheerbeckens or shaving bowls is a 1662 invoice from the Director of the Deshima factory in Nagasaki regarding an order for 258 of these dishes for shipment to the Netherlands. After this point shaving dishes become a regular export item. 

 

Shaving bowls were used by barbers and were indispensable in the Dutch household too. They were made of earthenware, pewter, copper and even silver. Beside their function as a shaving utensil, they had an alternative use, namely to let blood from a vein in the arm during blood-letting. This was a medical procedure thought to drain bad blood from the system, which was also performed by the barber/surgeon. In the seventeenth century, regulations were put in place in England to govern what barbers were permitted to do. Thus they became confined to bloodletting and treating external diseases. In Prussia the barbers' and the surgeons' guild joined in 1779, and it was said of great Prussian surgeons that they had risen "up from the barber's bowl”. Both purposes explain the semi-circular saving. The two holes in the rim are for a cord or string. A shaving basin with the actual silk string still attached was excavated in Amsterdam. The string was used to suspend it from the client's neck to catch lather and water during shaving, or to hang the bowl on the wall thus implying that owners also appreciated the bowl for its decorative value as well as its function. Shaving bowls can be seen hanging on the wall as such in some dollhouses. 

 

 

  

Cornelis Troost, Arlequin toovenaar en barbier, 1738, Mauritshuis, The Hague, Netherlands, inv. nr. 184. In spite of the satirical intent, the painting reflects actual usage. 

 

 

   

The doll’s house of Petronella Dunois (1650-1695), c. 1676, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, inv.nr. BK-14656. Two shaving dishes are suspended on the left wall.

 

Chinese shaving bowls usually have the holes in the footring instead of the rim. Most Japanese barber’s bowls are more or less rounded, whereas Chinese barber’s bowls usually are oval (for a Chinese example, please see the sold archives object 2011301)

 

Larger pieces of Japanese porcelain such as plates, bowls and dishes, had a tendency to ‘sag’ during firing. That’s why they were often supported in the kiln by small stoneware pillars. After firing, these small cones or spurs which adhered to the base were knocked off, leaving behind small unglazed rough patches or spur marks on the base. The supports were arranged in X, Y or other patterns. Whether they have any relevance to dating or an attribution to a specific kiln is still unresolved. These spur marks are typically Japanese and are rarely seen on Chinese porcelain. 

 

This shaving bowl shows one large spur, instead of several small spur marks, which is unusual. Also, the cone is still intact, which is quite rare (for another such example please see the sold archives object 2011510).

 

For an almost identically decorated Japanese bowl and cover, please see: 

Condition: Some wear to the iron-red decoration due to use. 

 

References:

Jörg 1982/2, cat. 123

Arts 1983, pp.32-33

Düsseldorf 2000, cat. 28

Arita 2000, p. 91, cat. 282, p. 152, p. 163 & p.233

Impey 2002, p. 210, cat. 353 

Jörg 2003/1, p. 14 & pp.184-185

Sargent 2012, p.189 cat. 88

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2011664
2011664

Sold Ceramics - Sold Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - Tableware and other Porcelain with Western Shapes - Page 1

 

Object 2011664

 

Miniature chamber-pot

 

Japan

 

1700-1730

 

Height 31 mm (1.22 inch), diameter of mouthrim 46 mm (1.81 inch), diameter of footring 20 mm (0.79 inch), weight 23 grams (0.81 ounce (oz.))

 

Miniature chamber-pot on footring, spreading rim, curved handle with thumb-rest. Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, iron-red and gold with grasses and a chrysanthemum flower spray. On the handle and rim florests between scrolls.

 

The use of this miniature chamber-pot is unknown. It is too large to be placed in a doll's house. In general, miniatures were included in groups of decorative porcelain placed on shelves, brackets and consoles in the Dutch interior, or in the porcelain rooms of the grand houses such as those still in Pommersfelden and Charlottenburg, Germany. Similar miniature objects were also made of silver and glass, and the pieces of Japanese (and Chinese) porcelain fit into the general trend. (Jörg 2003/1, p.190)

  

Condition: Restored.

 

Reference:

Jörg 2003/1, p.190 & cat. 238

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2011818
2011818

Sold Ceramics - Sold Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - Tableware and other Porcelain with Western Shapes - Page 1

 

Object 2011818

 

Shaving bowl

 

Japan

 

1700-1730

 

Height 75 mm (2.95 inch), diameter of rim 248 mm (10.83 inch), diameter of footring 93 mm (4.33 inch), weight 676 grams (23.84 ounce (oz.))

 

Published: Fraeylema Nieuws, number 52, September 2015

 

Shaving bowl on high footring. Moulded ribbed rim with a saved semi-circular section and two small holes opposite the cut-out section. Decorated in underglaze blue and overglaze iron-red, black, green, grey and yellow enamel with a jardinière filled with leafy flowering peonies. In the middle in the glaze, a large ring was left unglazed. On the rim a mountainous landscape with trees and a pagoda alternating with three peony flower heads reserved on a underglaze blue ground. On the reverse two wide spread prunus sprays. 

 

Shaving bowls were used by barbers and were indispensable in the Dutch household too. They were made of earthenware, pewter, copper and even silver. They had an alternative use, namely to let blood from a vein in the arm during blood-letting, a medical procedure thought to drain bad blood from the system also performed by the barber/surgeon. In the seventeenth century, regulations were put in place in England to govern what barbers were permitted to do. Thus the became confined to bloodletting and treating external diseases. In Prussia the barbers' and the surgeons' guild joined in 1779, and it was said of great Prussian surgeons that they had risen "up from the barber's bowl'. Both purposes explain the semi-circular saving. The two holes are for a cord used to suspend it from the client's neck to catch lather and water during shaving, or to hang the bowl on the wall thus implying that owners also appreciated the bowl for its decorative value as well as its function. Chinese shaving bowls usually have the holes in the footring while Japanese examples have them in the rim. (Jörg 2003/1, p.184), (Sargent 2012, p.189)

 

Most shaving basins are decorated in Imari, but this example was made in one of the smaller kilns which used a different technique, in which the objects were stacked on to each other in the oven while in the middle of the shaving basin, in the glaze, a large ring was left unglazed in order to prevent that the objects would stick to each other during the firing process. That ring is sometimes quite visible, on this object it is subtly hidden in the decoration in enamel colors. (source: Fraeylema Nieuws, number 52, September 2015)

 

For an identically sized and shaped shaving bowls, please see:

Condition: Two chips to the rim.

 

References:

Jörg 1982/2, cat. 123

Jörg 2003/1, p.184 & cat. 229

Sargent 2012, p.183 & p.189

Fraeylema Nieuws, number 52, September 2015

 

Price: Sold.

 

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