Pater Gratia Oriental Art

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Sold Japanese Imari 1690-1800

 

'Gold' Imari

 

Page 2

A group that seems to have been especially favoured in The Netherlands, traditionally called 'Gold Imari', dates to the early 18th century. These wares are painted in gold only, in gold and iron-red, or in gold and red with a few touches of green, aubergine and black. 'Gold Imari' is relatively well represented in collections in the northern parts of The Netherlands but which occurs less often in old English and German collections

 

From about 1700 the gold often has a pink-violet hue ('pink lustre'), which is clearly visible on the white porcelain background when the gold is very thin or has been rubbed off. It seems that the Japanese enamellers used a different process to the Chinese, because Chinese pieces do not have this pink violet hue. (Jörg 2003/1, pp.92-93

2010282
2010282

Sold Ceramics - Sold Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - 'Gold' Imari - Page 2

 

Object 2010282

 

Teapot

 

Japan

 

1710-1730

 

Height with cover 92 mm (3.62 inch), diameter handle to spout 130 mm (5.12 inch), diameter of footring 50 mm (1.97 inch)

 

Teapot on footring, ribbed body, curved handle with straight spout, 'Gold' Imari, decorated in gold, iron-red and a pink-gold wash with groups of flowering chrysanthemum plants, around the shoulder lotus petals in a low relief . Around the neck a zig-zag lines border. On the cover flowering chrysanthemum plants and on the spout and handle spiral motifs.

 

Condition: Firing flaws to the handle and mouthrim and a very tiny shallow chip to the mouthrim.

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2010600
2010600

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Object 2010600

 

Dish

 

Japan

 

c.1720

 

Height 53 mm (2.09 inch), diameter of rim 210 mm (8.27 inch), diameter of footring 119 mm (4.69 inch), weight 671 grams (19.43 ounce (oz.))

 

Sixteen-lobbed dish on footring with spreading sides and a lobbed rim. On the base four spur-marks in a Y-pattern. 'Gold' Imari, decorated in overglaze gold, iron-red and a light pinkish gold wash with various flowering chrysanthemums in a circle. Round the foot of the cavetto a petalled circle. On the cavetto seven stylised golden chrysanthemum flower heads outlined in red with white centres (some in low relief) are scattered across all the panels. The reverse with four camellia flower heads surrounded by scrolling branches.

 

Condition: Wear to the decoration in the centre and on the sides, a tiny fleabite to the rim.

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2011630
2011630

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Object 2011630

 

Tea/coffee cup and saucer

 

Japan

 

1700-1730

 

Height of tea/coffee cup 51 mm (2.00 inch), diameter of rim 85 mm (3.35 inch), diameter of footring 37 mm (1.46 inch), weight 85 grams (3.00 ounce (oz.))

Height of saucer 30 mm (1.18 inch), diameter of rim 142 mm (5.59 inch), diameter of footring 68 mm or (2.68 inch), weight 147 grams (5.19 ounce (oz.))

 

Tea/coffee cup and saucer on footrings, slightly everted rims. 'Gold' Imari, decorated in gold, iron-red and a light-pinkish gold wash with a flower spray with a butterfly in flight in a central roundel surrounded by a  squirrel climbing through flowering branches growing from three crossed bamboo sticks, alternating with a panel filled with two birds perched on a flowering branch, the reverse is undecorated. Th teacup is decorated en suite.

 

This tea/coffee cup and saucer is of a size suitable for tea as well as coffee. (Jörg 2003/1, p.201)

 

Similar shaped and in 'Gold' Imari decorated large tea/coffee cups and saucers (with another design) are in the collection of the Groninger Museum, please see:

For a dish decorated with the 'squirrel and vine' design in underglaze blue, please see:

For a double gourd ewer decorated with the 'squirrel and vine' design in Kakiemon enamels, please see:

The 'squirrel and vine' design also occurs on Chinese export porcelain objects, for a baluster shaped vase decorated with this design, please see:

Condition:

Tea/coffee cup: Perfect.

Saucer: Perfect.

 

References:

Jenyns 1979, cat. 58a

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 256

Kyushu 2003, cat. 1226 & 1889

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2011478
2011478

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Object 2011478

 

Saucer

 

Japan

 

1700-1720

 

Height 16 mm (0.63 inch), diameter of rim 90 mm (3.54 inch), diameter of footring 40 mm or (1.57 inch), weight 44 grams (1.55 ounce (oz.))

 

Saucer on footring, slightly everted rim. 'Gold' Imari, decorated in, iron-red and a light-pinkish gold wash with a single flowering peony in a roundel surrounded by grasses and three groups of flowering millet and camellia. In between each group a single butterfly in flight. The reverse is undecorated.

 

These type of saucer dishes are examples of the 'Gold' Imari group. Non underglaze blue or other enamels are used, the light pinkish wash lending sufficient contrast to the brighter red and gold.

 

In Japanese ceramic art the butterfly, chõ-chõ in Japanese, is associated with the peony flower and the Chinese lion. (Gorham 1971, p.200)

 

In Japan the white butterfly is considered to be the soul of the living or the dead. It is always treated kindly when discovered in the house for it may be a friend come to announce his death. Many legends exist about this belief. A famous one is that of an old man who was lying dying in his room when a white butterfly fluttered in. An attendant tried to drive it out to prevent it from waking the sleeper, after which the insect, followed by the attendant, flew directly to the nearby cemetery, where it lingered on a woman's tomb. After the old man had died it was discovered that the name inscribed on the tomb was that of the old man's fiancée, who had died on the eve of the wedding long ago. The old man had never married, but stayed true to her and visited her grave every day. When he became ill and could no longer go to her, she came to him in the form of a white butterfly. (Arts 1983, p.124)

 

For similarly, 'Gold' Imari, decorated objects, please see;

Condition: Perfect.

 

References:

Gorham 1971, p.200

Arts 1983, p.124

Impey 2002, cat. 444

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 256

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2012109
2012109

Sold Ceramics - Sold Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - 'Gold' Imari - Page 2

 

Object 2012109

 

Dish

 

Japan

 

1700-1720

  

Height 34 mm (1.33 inch), diameter of rim 213 mm (8.35 inch), diameter of footring 107 mm (4.21 inch), weight 425 grams (14.99 once (oz.)),

 

Dish on footring, everted lobed rim. On the base three spur-marks in a V-pattern. 'Gold' Imari, decorated in gold, iron-red and a light-pinkish gold wash. In the centre a pair of quails near a shore under a millet plant. On the sides peony flower heads with foliage alternating with a butterfly in flight. On the rim flower heads alternating with leaves. The reverse is undecorated.

 

A group that seems to have been especially favoured in The Netherlands, traditionally called 'Gold Imari', dates to the early 18th century. These wares are painted in gold only, in gold and iron-red, or in gold and red with a few touches of green, aubergine and black. 'Gold Imari' is relatively well represented in collections in the northern parts of The Netherlands but which occurs less often in old English and German collections

 

From about 1700 the gold often has a pink-violet hue ('pink lustre'), which is clearly visible on the white porcelain background when the gold is very thin or has been rubbed off. It seems that the Japanese enamellers used a different process to the Chinese, because Chinese pieces do not have this pink violet hue. (Jörg 2003/1, pp.92-93)

 

The quail, closely allied to the partridge, is an emblem of courage both in China and Japan, as it is highly esteemed as a fighting bird. In North China people made these birds fight under a basket, where millet first had been strewn to make them jealous. Moreover, quails are believed to change into pheasants eventually. On Japanese porcelain they are frequently depicted amidst autumn grasses under millet. This quail and millet design, symbolizing the autumn is especially common on Kakiemon, but is also found on ko Kutani, Imari and blue-and-white wares. It has been suggested that that particular form is copied from the work of the painter Tosa Mitsuoki (1607-1691), but it probably originated from Chinese paintings of the Sung period. This motif has been copied on European porcelain, especially at Bow and Chelsea, where it is used as a decoration on the so-called 'partridge plates', and also on Meissen porcelain. (Arts 1983, pp.134-135

 

Condition: Two hairlines to the rim.

 

References:

Arts 1983, pp.134-135

Jörg 2003/1, pp.92-93

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2010612 & 2010406
2010612 & 2010406

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Objects 2010612 & 2010406

 

Bowl and saucer

 

Japan

 

1710-1730

 

Height of bowl 70 mm (2.76 inch), diameter of rim 139 mm (5.47 inch), diameter of footring 59 mm (2.32 inch)

Height of saucer 23 mm (0.91 inch), diameter of rim 180 mm (7.09 inch), diameter of footring 95 mm (3.74 inch)

 

Exhibited: The Asian Galleries Reinmagined - Color Across Asia held from 21 December 2016 to 13 May 2018 at the Ackland Art Museum, The University of North Carolina at Chaphil Hill, The United States of America, Object Guide no. 70.

 

Bowl on footring with spreading lobbed rim. The inside ribbed. Matching ribbed saucer on footring, on the base a single spur-mark. The matching saucer was acquired at a later date. 'Gold' Imari, decorated in overglaze iron-red, green, black and gold. 

 

The saucer with a central design of a pine tree and blossoming cherry with two birds perched on a branch surrounded by two groups of rocks, grasses and peonies. On the sides and rim cloud-like partitions with flower sprays, foliate scrolls, paulownia branches and two phoenixes in flight. On the reverse three fuiting 'Buddha's hand citron' or finger lemon fruit, peach and pomegranate sprays. The bowl is decorated en suite, but with one standing phoenix and one in flight.

 

This type of decoration is traditionally called 'gold' Imari because of the lavish use of gold, on this bowl it is combined with overglaze green enamel, black and iron-red. (Jörg 2003/1, p.112)

 

For an identically shaped and decorated bowl and saucer, please see:

For identically decorated bowls, please see:

Condition:

Bowl: Perfect.

Saucer: Perfect.

 

References:

Jörg 1983, cat. 11

Suchomel 1997, cat. 178

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 118 & 118a

 

Price: Sold.

 

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More pictures of object 2011311, another identically shaped, sized and decorated, sold bowl >>

More pictures of object 2012083, another identically shaped, sized and decorated, sold bowl >>

2011443
2011443

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Object 2011443

 

Dish

 

Japan

 

1730-1740

 

Height 33 mm (1.30 inch), diameter of rim 201 mm (7.91 inch), diameter of footring 125 mm (4.92 inch)

 

Sixteen-lobbed dish on footring with spreading sides, a lobbed rim and a glazed base. On the base four spur-marks. 'Gold' Imari, decorated in overglaze iron-red, green, black and gold with two cranes, a blossoming peony and prunus, chrysanthemum leaves and a bamboo plant. Three flowering peony, chrysanthemum and prunus sprays to the reverse.

 

The crane is an auspicious symbol of longevity and a blessed life, a pair of cranes of a long and happy marriage. This type of decoration is traditionally called 'gold' Imari because of the lavish use of gold, on this dish it is combined with green and black enamel. (Jörg 2003/1, p.112 & p.185)

 

Both the Worcester and Derby factories in the UK copied this pattern or versions of it in the 18th century and Spode & Davenport in the 19th century. (Jenyns 1979, cat 45a

 

For an identically shaped and decorated dish, please see:

Condition : Perfect, three unglazed spots, caused by the firing process, to the reverse.

 

References:

Jenyns 1979, cat. 45a

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 118 & 230

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2011695
2011695

Sold Ceramics - Sold Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - 'Gold' Imari - Page 2

 

Object 2011695

 

Dish

 

Japan

 

1700-1720

 

Height 39 mm (1.54 inch), diameter 213 mm (8.39 inch), diameter of footring 113 mm (4.45 inch), weight 445 grams (15.70 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on footring, spreading six-lobbed rim. On the base two spur-marks. 'Gold' Imari, decorated in iron-red, gold and black enamel with a central roundel filled with a bird perched on the branch of a flowering tree. The roundel is surrounded by two groups of rockwork one with a wide pine tree. On the sides two phoenixes one standing the other in flight under a wave-shaped border in black enamel. On the rim six half peony flower heads with reserves filled with flowering plants and divided by triangles in black enamel. On the reverse two flower sprays.

 

The intention of this black enamelling technique was to imitate lacquer, as lacquer adheres poorly to the porcelain body, this enamel imitation was a good alternative. (Jörg 2003/1, cat. 129 & 340)

 

For objects similarly decorated with black enamel / lacquer imitation please see;

Condition: Some wear to the decoration, a firing flaw to the base, a popped bubble of glaze and a very tiny shallow glaze rough spot to the rim.

 

References:

Reichel 1981, cat. 55

Jörg 1995, figure 55

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 129 & 340

 

Price: Sold.

 

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