Pater Gratia Oriental Art

Sold Ceramics

 

Sold Japanese Imari 1690-1800

 

Dishes

 

Page 2

When internal wars began to impede the production of, and consequently the trade in, Chinese porcelain toward the end of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644), several Dutch Merchants began to buy porcelain in Japan. At the same time, the production of faience pottery in Delft was stimulated, in order to compensate the shortage of Chinese porcelain. From 1658 onward, the Dutch East India Company, (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie, VOC) also recognized these commercial opportunities and began to order greater quantities of porcelain from Japan. In addition to a very diverse assortment of blue-and-white porcelain. largely in the style of traditional Chinese export goods, the coloured Japanese porcelain formed an unexpected new article in the Netherlands. It soon became very fashionable and the Company was able to generate a great deal of profit in this field.

 

One potter who benefited greatly from the new Dutch orders was Sakaida Kakiemon, who owned a porcelain kiln near Nangawara, just outside Arita. His porcelains characterized by a lucid whit composition and texture with decorations in various tints of enamel including orange-red, grass-green and blue.

 

By the second half of the 17th century, this porcelain had already seen the rise of a serious rival, the so-called Imari porcelain, named after the port in Kyushu from which it was shipped. This Imari was cheaper, and had vibrant, full decoration in cobalt blue, orange-red and gold, occasionally with extra details in green enamel, aubergine or black. It was manufactured specifically for export and harmonized perfectly with the baroque taste of the buyers in the Netherlands. It became so popular that the Chinese also began to produce it from the 18th century onward.

2012134
2012134

Sold Ceramics - Sold Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - Dishes - Page 2

 

Object 2012134

 

Dish

 

Japan

 

1700-1720

 

Height 52 mm (2.05 inch), diameter of rim 343 mm (13.50 inch), diameter of footring 176 mm (6.93 inch), weight 1,376 grams (48.54 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on footring, flat rim with a scalloped edge. On the base five spur-marks in a X-pattern. Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, iron-red and gold. In the central medallion a flower vase with shaped handles filled with various flowers on a terrace. The sides with eight flower vases with shaped handles filled with various flowers on low jardinières. On the rim eight reserves filled flower sprays on an underglaze dark blue ground with foliate scrolls in gold. On the reverse three flowering branches - one of peony, one of chrysanthemum and one of prunus. Round the foot a lozenge-pattern border.

 

The scalloped edge on this dish is unusual for this period rarely seen on dishes of this size.

 

For a similarly decorated dish, please see:

Condition: A hairline to the rim.

 

Reference:

Suchomel 1997, cat. 190

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2011511
2011511

Sold Ceramics - Sold Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - Dishes - Page 2

 

Object 2011511

 

Dish

 

Japan

 

1700-1720

 

Height 49 mm (1.93 inch), diameter 294 mm (11.57 inch), diameter of footring 146 mm (5.75 inch), weight 830 grams (29.28 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on footring, flat rim. On the base three spur-marks. Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, iron-red and gold with a fence and a flowering wisteria tree. On the sides and rim on a blue ground with foliate scrolls in gold three wide and three narrow panels containing flowering peony and palm leaves alternating with flowering peonies. The reverse with three chrysanthemum sprays.

 

At the end of the 18th century Dutch porcelain manufacturers Loosdrecht en Amstel Porcelain copied Oriental porcelain designs probably as replacements for broken objects from existing Chinese or Japanese services. Amstel porcelain copied this specific Japanese Imari design at the end of the 18th century. (Jörg 2003/1, p.105), (Jörg 1983, p.32)

 

For a similarly decorated large dish, please see;

For a similarly decorated Amstel porcelain dish, please see;

Condition: Some wear to the decoration. 

 

References:

Jörg 1983, p.32

Ayers, Impey & Mallet 1990, cat. 324

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 108 & Fig. 108b

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2010931
2010931

Sold Ceramics - Sold Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - Dishes - Page 2

 

Object 2010931

 

Dish

 

Japan

 

1700-1720

 

Height 50 mm (1.97 inch), diameter of rim 285 mm (11,22 inch), diameter of footring 147 mm (5.79 inch), weight 894 grams (31.54 ounce (oz.))

 

Octagonal dish on footring, flat rim with slightly upturned edge. Four spur-marks in a Y-pattern on the base. Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, iron-red, gold and black and green enamel with a jardiniere (hanakago-de) on a veranda filled with flowering peony and chrysanthemum plants surrounded by a narrow border with florets between scrolls alternating with leafy scrolls. The sides and rim with two shaped panels filled with a shishi and two panels with flowering chrysanthemum sprays in between the panels peony flower heads and leafy scrolls in underglaze blue ground and gold. On the reverse three chrysanthemum sprays. On the base a single, concentric band. To the base an old paper collectors label that reads: '40'.

 

The "Chinese lion" or kara shishi is supposed to be the Chinese conception of a creature never seen in China but told of by travellers or copied from the pictures from India as there are no records of lions in ancient Chinese writings before about 250 A.D. It is also called a Chinese Dog or Dog of Fo (Buddha) from which it is clear that dog-like characteristics prevail over the original leonine ones. The lion symbolizes guardianship and protection, from which belief is derived the practice of placing statues of lions at the doors of palaces and tombs as guardians of both the living and the dead against all evil.

 

The shishi is characterized by a fierce expression, large bulging eyes and curly mane, a bushy tail and curly locks of hair on the legs. Japanese pairs of figures of shishi usually have both animals with an ornamental / brocade ball, whereas Chinese examples usually have one with a ball, the other (female) with a cub. It is clear that the shishi is no ordinary lion, but a mythical beast. It is probable that the lion in this mythical form came over from the Middle East as a guardian figure in Chinese pre-historical times. After the introduction of Buddhism, the shishi retained its function as a guardian, and pairs of these animals were placed on either side of the entrance of temples in China and Japan.   

 

For a large dish decorated in the same style, please see:

Condition: Wear to the black enamel and a chip to the rim.

 

References:

Arts 1983, pp.79-80 & pp.108-110

Jörg 2003/1, 112, 148 & 149

Fitski 2011, p.160

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2011510
2011510

Sold Ceramics - Sold Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - Dishes - Page 2

 

Object 2011510

 

Dish

 

Japan

 

1700-1720

 

Height 35 mm (1.38 inch), diameter of rim 252 mm (9.92 inch), diameter of footring 120 mm (4.72 inch), weight 596 grams (21.02 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on footring, spreading flat scalloped rim with a glazed base. On the base four spur-marks in a Y-pattern. Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, iron-red and gold with a low jardinière on which a miniature garden with rocks, a small palm tree and a vase filled with flowering peonies and wisterias surrounded by a narrow continuous flower scroll. On the sides and rim a blue ground with chrysanthemums in red and foliate scrolls in gold, two half kiku-flower motifs and four panels, two book-shaped, alternately filled with a riverscape and flowers with ribbons. The reverse with prunus, peony and chrysanthemum sprays.

 

The book-shaped panels on the sides and rim are unusual and together with the half kiku-flower motif most likely derived from (embroidered) Japanese textile designs. (Jörg 2003/1, pp.106-107 & p.111)

 

The spur-marks on the base are the remains of pointed supports that pierced the glaze. This was mostly done in Arita, Japan and rarely used in China. After the firing process these attached small supports were hammered of but on this specific dish, two of the original pointed supports are still intact and attached to the base. (Jörg 2011/1, p.248)

 

For similarly decorated dishes, please see;

Condition: A firing flaw to the centre, some wear to the decoration and fine crazing to the glaze. 

 

References:

Kassel 1990, cat. 278a-c

Suchomel 1997, cat. 150

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 110 & 115

Jörg 2011/1, p.248

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2011291
2011291

Sold Ceramics - Sold Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - Dishes - Page 2

 

Object 2011291

 

Dish

 

Japan

 

1700-1730

 

Height 40 mm (1.58 inch), diameter 222 mm (8.74 inch), diameter of footring 122 mm (4.80 inch), weight 462 grams (16.30 ounce (oz.)), (including brass frame)

 

Dish on footring, spreading sides and a lobbed rim. On the base two spur-marks. Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, iron-red, green enamel and gold with a flower basket on a fenced terrace filled with a flowering peony and wisteria plants in a lobbed cartouche. On the sides and rim are divided into eight panels, four panels are fillled with foliate scrolls in gold on a dark blue ground with reserved chrysanthemum and peony flower heads, two panels are divided with on one side geometric patterns and on the other side a pine-tree the last two panels are filled with  a crane in flight. The reverse with three prunus sprays. Gilt rim. Fitted in a brass frame.

 

The crane is an auspicious symbol of longevity and a blessed life, a pair of cranes of a long and happy marriage. (Jörg 2003/1, p.185)

 

Condition: Perfect.

 

Reference:

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 230

 

Price: Sold.

 

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