Pater Gratia Oriental Art

Sold Ceramics

 

Sold Chine de commande

 

Western Subjects 1680-1800

 

Western Designers

 

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In the Sold Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Western Designers category the sold objects are categorized In the following alphabetical order: 

  • Baudouin, Pierre-Antoine (1723-1769)
  • Bloemaert, Abraham (1564/66-1651)
  • Bonnart, Nicolas (1646-1717)
  • Merian, Maria Sybille (1647-1717)
  • Picart, Bernard (1673-1733)
  • Pronk, Cornelis (1691-1759)
  • Rubens, Peter Paul (1577-1640)

 

Baudouin, Pierre-Antoine (1723-1769)

Frenchman Pierre-Antoine Baudouin (1723-1769) was a pupil and imitator of of his brother-in-law François Boucher. Baudouin executed idyllic and erotic subjects. His 'La Cueilette des cerises' or the 'Cherry pickers' inspired François Boucher's large painting found at Kenwood in England. It was one of the most famous decorations on Chinese export porcelain, made for the European market around 1775.

 

 

'La Cueilette des cerises' or the 'Cherry pickers' Pierre-Antoine Baudouin (1723-1769) (Park 1973, nr. 22)
 

The scene is inspired by a print of the Frenchman Nicolas Ponce (1746-1831), after a design of Pierre-Antoine Baudouin, usually dated around 1775. Frenchman Pierre-Antoine Baudouin (1723-1769) was a pupil and imitator of of his brother-in-law François Boucher. Baudouin executed idyllic and erotic subjects. His 'La Cueilette des cerises' or the 'Cherry pickers' inspired François Boucher's large painting found at Kenwood in England. It was one of the most famous decorations on Chinese export porcelain, made for the European market around 1775

 

Groeneweg states that in the collection of the Victoria & Albert Museum in London the same more basic design of 'The Cherry Picker' - as on this bowl - is already found on a Dutch Delftware spittoon, dated on the rim "1747" and marked "MVP". Since this was only a year after Nicolas Ponce was born, his engraving couldn’t have been the inspiration for this more basic design of 'The Cherry Picker'. Groeneweg proposes that only the later Dutch East India Company, (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie, VOC) orders from 1778/79 of the The Cherry Picker can be connected with the engraving by Ponce. (Jörg 1978 p.162/annex 11, p.315), (Groeneweg & Braat 1988, pp.18-19), (V&A inv. C.23371910)

 

Lunsingh Scheurleer states that dishes decorated with 'The Cherry Picker' design belonged to the few porcelain that was ordered directly by the Dutch East India Company, (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie, VOC). In VOC archieves dating from 1777 this particular design was being refferd to as Appelplukker or appel picker. (Lunsingh Scheurleer 1989, p.217)

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Baudouin, Pierre-Antoine (1723-1769)

 

Object 2010133A

 

Saucer

 

China

 

After 1777

 

Height 32 mm (1.26 inch), diameter of rim 135 mm (5.32 inch), diameter of the footring 78 mm (3.07 inch

 

Saucer on footring, straight rim. Decorated with various overglaze enamels and gold with the 'Cherry Picker' design after Baudouin with a man on a ladder throwing cherries to a woman below, she catches the cherries in her skirt while another (wo)man? kneels besides a large basket and a dog. On the rim a narrow chain pattern border. The reverse is undecorated.

 

For identically decorated objects, please see:

Condition: A firing flaw and two hairlines to the rim.

 

References:

Honey 1944, Plate 139

Goldsmith Phillips 1956, plate 60

Beurdeley 1962, Fig. 27, 28 & 29

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1966, cat. 204

Park 1973, cat. 22, 23 & 24

Gordon 1977, cat. 63

Jörg 1978 p.162/annex 11, p.315.

Jörg 1982/1, cat. 48

Hervouët 1986, cat. 4.23

Groeneweg & Braat 1988, pp.18-19.

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1989, cat. 191

London 1990, lot 173

London 2002, lot 444

V&A inv. C.23371910

 

Price: Sold.

 

More pictures >>

Not illustrated object 2010133B, another identically shaped, sized and decorated sold saucer.

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Baudouin, Pierre-Antoine (1723-1769)

 

Object 2010585

 

Bowl

 

China

 

After 1777

 

Height 56 mm (2.20 inch), diameter of rim 110 mm (4.33 inch), diameter of the footring 54 mm (2.13 inch)

 

Bowl on footring, straight rim. Decorated with various overglaze enamels and gold with the 'Cherry Picker' design after Baudouin with a man on a ladder throwing cherries to a woman below, she catches the cherries in her skirt while another (wo)man? kneels besides a large basket and a dog. On the rim a narrow chain pattern border.

 

For identically decorated objects, please see:

Condition: A V-shaped, consolidated, hairline to the rim.

 

References:

Honey 1944, Plate 139

Goldsmith Phillips 1956, plate 60

Beurdeley 1962, Fig. 27, 28 & 29

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1966, cat. 204

Park 1973, cat. 22, 23 & 24

Gordon 1977, cat. 63

Jörg 1978 p.162/annex 11, p.315.

Jörg 1982/1, cat. 48

Hervouët 1986, cat. 4.23

Groeneweg & Braat 1988, pp.18-19.

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1989, cat. 191

London 1990, lot 173

London 2002, lot 444

V&A inv. C.23371910

 

Price: Sold.

 

More pictures >>

 

Bloemaert, Abraham (1564/66-1651)

As a child, Abraham Bloemaert (1564-1651) moved with his family from Gorinchem to Utrecht. He was apprenticed to no less than five different masters, among them his father Cornelis Bloemaert I. Having travelled to Paris and Amsterdam, in 1593 Bloemaert returned to Utrecht. There he was to remain for the rest of his life. Abraham Bloemaert acquired a name for his paintings of mythological and religious subjects. Bloemaert - a pious Catholic in the Protestant Northern Netherlands - received numerous commissions from the Catholic Church. Bloemaert’s early paintings feature the exaggerated, elongated and muscular figures of mannerist art. In the 1620s, when his career was at its height, his style began to change. Influenced by his pupils, including Gerard van Honthorst and Hendrick ter Bruggen, he painted a number of works in the Caravaggist manner. 

 

The 'Un pêcheur' (The Fisherman) design occurs in many variations in border design, colour scheme and the way in which elements of the principal design are rendered. Other varieties show a mountainous landscape (probably a Chinese variation). (Jörg 1989/2, p.134)

 

 

 

 

A print by Cornelis J. Visscher de Jonge (1629?-58?), a Dutch engraver who based his design on a drawing by the Haarlem-born painter and printmaker Abraham Bloemaert (1564/66-1651). (Reproduced from: Chine de Commande, (D.F. Lunsingh Scheurleer, (Uitgevermaatschappij De Tijdstroom BV, Lochem 1989), p.219, Afb. 193a.)

   

Lunsingh Scheurleer illustrates an engraving by Cornelis J. Visscher de Jonge, which is almost identical, on the porcelain the later added mountains in the background seem to have been evolved from the trees in the original print. The scene is recorded with at least three border decorations, the earliest with a diaper rim and Meissen-style cartouches of about 1736-38, and another about five years later with this type of rim en grisaille. A Delft faience example in blue is in the Musée de la Compagnie des Indes, Lorient, France. (Gordon 1977, p.76, cat 60), (Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. 2, pp.369-370, cat. 362), (Lunsingh Scheurleer 1989, cat. 193a ), (Sargent 2012, p.252)

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Bloemaert, Abraham (1564-1651)

 

Object 2011935

 

Teapot

 

China

 

1745-1750

 

Height with cover 130 mm (5.11 inch), height without cover 93 mm (3.66 inch),  diameter handle to spout 200 mm (7.87 inch), diameter mouthrim 59 mm (2.32 inch), diameter footring 60 mm (2.36 inch), weight with cover 425 grams (14.99 ounce (oz.)), weight cover 71 grams (2.50 ounce (oz.))

 

Teapot of globular shape on footring. Straight spout with a curved C-shaped handle. The inlaying flat cover with pointed knob and lobbed edge. Decorated en camaïeu with overglaze lilac pink enamels and gold with a fisherman standing at a riverbank near two large wicker baskets and a large tree, two birds in flight and in the background three houses. Round the shoulder  a border of scalework and irregular panels supported by peacocks and garlands. The cover is decorated en suite

 

The decoration on this teapot has been taken from a drawing titled 'Un pêcheur,' (The Fisherman) by Abraham Bloemaert (1564/66-1651), a Haarlem-born painter and printmaker, who specialized in historical subjects. Originally Bloemaert's design was engraved by his son Cornelis II (ca.1603-ca.1680), but the design on this teapot has been reversed, which points to the idea that it was based instead on a later re-engraving, possibly a wood-cut published by the Dutch engraver Cornelis J. Visscher de Jonge (1629?-1658?).(Sargent 2012, p.252)

 

Chine de commande objects decorated en camaïeu in overglaze lilac pink enamels are rare. (Jörg 1989/2, p.170)

 

For early objects with the 'Un pêcheur' design with a diaper rim and Meissen-style cartouches decorated in various overglaze enamels and gold, please see:

For early objects with the 'Un pêcheur' design with a diaper rim and Meissen-style cartouches decorated en grisaille with iron-red and gold, please see:

For other objects with the 'Un pêcheur' design, decorated en grisaille with gold, please see:

Interestingly the border design with the diaper rim and Meissen-style cartouches used on the objects with the 'Un pêcheur' design mentioned above match those on the so-called 'Sail maker' Chine de commande design, for an example of this dish please see:

For other objects with the 'Un pêcheur' design, decorated en camaïeu in overglaze lilac pink enamels, please see:

Condition: A few tiny frits to the tip of the spout and two frits to the rim of the cover. Various firing tension glaze hairlines to the base running through the footring and to the underside of the spout.

 

References:

Beurdeley 1962, cat. 123 

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1966, cat. 197, 198 & 289 

Gordon 1977, cat. 60

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1974, cat. 206, 207 & 298 

Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. 2, cat. 362 

Boulay 1984, p.272, nr. 1 

Hervouët 1986, cat. 3.8, 3.9 & 3.10 

Jörg 1989/2, p.170, cat. 43 & 44 

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1989, cat. 193a & b 

Sargent 2012, cat. 126 & 127

 

Price: Sold.

 

More pictures >>

 

Bonnart, Nicolas (1646-1717)

Nicolas Bonnart and his brothers Robert, Henri and Jean were all engaged in the production and sale of engravings from c.1675 at addresses in the rue St Jacques, which remained a centre of this activity down to the nineteenth century. Of no outstanding distinction as artists, they nevertheless acquired fame both through their fashion prints, which reflect with unusual accuracy the changing modes of the day, and from their introduction as models for these of leading figures of the court.

It would be of interest to know trough what channels this unusual group of porcelains came to be ordered. Both the faithfulness of the copying and the hatched style of the drawing confirm the prints as their direct source. However, they as well have been made for clients in Holland where such prints appeared in pirated editions, e.g.by I. Gole of Amsterdam. (Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. 1, pp.77-78)

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Bonnart, Nicolas (1646-1717)

 

Object 2011677

 

Dish

 

China

 

1700-1710

 

Height 22 mm (0.87 inch), diameter of rim 157 mm (6.18 inch), diameter of footring 82 mm (3.23 inch), weight 124 grams (4.37 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on footring, flat rim. Decorated in underglaze blue with a group of Europeans in fashionable dress on a tiled terrace by a pavilion. The ladies' hair is dressed à la mode Fontanges, and the man wears a long wig. On the rim a border with rocks, flower sprays and birds in flight. On the reverse three wide peony sprays. Marked on the base with the symbol mark, Artemisia leaf, in a double circle, underglaze blue.

 

PT DS Howard p.41 cat 7

 

(Reproduced from, The Choice of the Private Trader. The Private Market in Chinese Export Porcelain illustrated from the Hodroff Collection, (D.S. Howard, Zwemmer, London, 1994), p.41, cat. 7. (copyright in bibliographic data and images is held by the publisher or by their respective licensors: all rights reserved) This dish is not included in this sale/offer.) 

 

Above a dish with a design derived from French 'costume' prints of the end of the seventeenth century. This 'Music Party' design was copied from a print engraved by the Parisian Nicolas Bonnart (1646-1718), and drawn by his brother Robert Bonnart, which is shown in the accompanying illustration.

 

China for the West, Howard and Ayers p 77 cat 35

 

A print engraved by the Parisian Nicolas Bonnart (1646-1718), and drawn by his brother Robert Bonnart,

(Reproduced from, China for the West. Chinese Porcelain and other Decorative Arts for Export illustrated from the Mottahedeh Collection, (D.S. Howard & J. Ayers, Philip Wilson Publishers for Sotheby Parke Bernet Publications, London 1978), vol. 1, p.77, cat. 35. (copyright in bibliographic data and images is held by the publisher or by their respective licensors: all rights reserved) This engraving is not included in this sale/offer.)

 

PT DS Howard p.41 cat 7 a 

 

 

Reproduced from, The Choice of the Private Trader. The Private Market in Chinese Export Porcelain illustrated from the Hodroff Collection, (D.S. Howard, Zwemmer, London, 1994), p.41, cat. 7. (copyright in bibliographic data and images is held by the publisher or by their respective licensors: all rights reserved) This dish is not included in this sale/offer. 

 

Above a rather deep dish with a flat rim, painted with a group of Europeans in fashionable dress on a tiled terrace by a pavilion with a classical cornice. The lady seated to the right holds a flower to her face. The girl hands her another from a basket held by a servant, while a man in the background also holds up a flower spray. The ladies' hair is dressed à la mode Fontanges, and the man wears a long wig. Round the sides in eight arcaded panels is repeated a design of two women standing on either side of a plant; one holding a flower spray and the other a fan. After an unidentified print possibly illustrating the sense of smell, from a set of 'The Senses': judging from its resemblance in the style of this dish: this to seem to be the work of the brothers Bonnart. A simplified version of the central design is found also on some smaller plates, 6 1/4 inch in diameter which have a rim border of flower sprays and birds. (Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. 1, pp.77-78)

 

Although the figures on this dish are dressed in Western style, the subject matter of painting should be Chinese as people are holding plants. It was a kind of traditional entertainment activity in ancient China, which was called doucao (playing with plants) or dou baicao (playing with hundred plants) and quite popular among girls and kids. Sometimes men also took part in the game. This game came into being in the Six dynasties. On the day of Dragon Boat Festival, people competed in the number of plants they picked or in the number of plant species they knew. By the Tang dynasty, the content of the doucao competition changed and included two aspects: fist, people competed in the tenacity of plant stems; and secondly, they competed in the number of plants they picked. This activity continued till the Qing dynasty. It was also recorded in the famous novel The Story of the Sone by Cao Xueqin. Here a scene about the second way of the doucao game is depicted on the dish, but it is very rare that people dressed in Western style were painted to show the traditional Chinese folk game - doucao. (Shanghai 2009, p.136)

 

For identically shaped, sized and decorated, simplified version dishes, please see:

Condition: Two fleabites, two frits, a chip and a hairline to the reverse rim.

 

References:

Beurdeley 1962, Fig. 12

Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. 1, cat. 35 & 36

Boulay 1984, p.200, cat. 2

Hervouët 1986, cat. 4.76 & 4.77 

London 1990, lot 169 (one of a pair)

Howard 1994, cat. 7

Shanghai 2009, pp.136-139, cat 57 & 58

 

Price: Sold.

 

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Merian, Maria Sybille (1647-1717) 

German/Dutch botanist Maria Sybille Merian (1647-1717) worked as a botanical artist. She published collections of engravings of plants in 1675, 1677 and 1680. She collected and observed live insects and created detailed drawings to illustrate insect metamorphosis. In 1699 the city of Amsterdam sponsored Merian to travel to Surinam were she made sketching of local animals and plants. In 1701 malaria forced her return to Holland, in 1705 she published a book Metamorphosis Insectorum Surinamensium about the insects of Surinam.

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Merian, Maria Sybille (1647-1717)

 

Object 2011359

 

Dish

 

China

 

c.1740

 

Height 26 mm (1.02 inch), diameter of rim 262 mm (10.31 inch), diameter of footring 145 mm (5.71 inch)

 

Dish on footring, flat underglaze brown-edged rim (jia mangkou). Decorated in underglaze blue and gold with two flowers, one iris the other possibly a peony variant encircled by a decorative border in underglaze blue with flower heads in gold. On the sides and rim intertwined floral and foliate scrolls.

 

German/Dutch botanist Maria Sybille Merian (1647-1717), described the insects of the West Indies, Surinam in particular. For the central decoration on this specific dish, no matching print of her has been found. The intertwined floral and foliate scrolls decoration on the sides make that this dish can be categorised as a "Merian-style" dish.

 

Sargent states that with regard to the polychrome enamel "Merian" dishes, four separate engravings from the third volume of Maria Sybille Merian's Raupenbuch (Caterpillar Book), published posthumously by her daughter in 1717, were used to compose the illustration on this plate and those in blue and white as well. (Sargent 2012, p.245)

 

For an identically in "Merian-style" decorated dish, please see:

For similar "Merian" dishes, decorated in polychrome enamels, please see:

Condition: Perfect.

 

References:

Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. 1, cat. 334

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1982, cat. 51

Boulay 1984, cat. 15

Howard 1994, plate 60

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, cat. 334

London 2002, lot 416

Sargent 2012, p.183 & cat. 120

 

Price: Sold.

 

More pictures >>

More pictures of object 2012056, another identically shaped, sized and decorated, sold dish >> 

 

Picart, Bernard (1673-1733)

Frenchman Bernard Picart (1673-1733) was an engraver who in 1708 moved to Amsterdam where he became a Protestant convert. Most of his work was book-illustrations, including the Bible and Ovid. His most famous work is 'Cérémonies et coutumes religieuses de tous les peuples du monde', appearing from 1723 to 1743. In 1708 Picart published an engraving with a short poem entitled: 'Les Pèlerins de l'île de Cythère', (The Pilgrims of the Island of Cythera). The same print is copied on Meissen porcelain of c.1730-1735 and it was possibly because of the popularity of this that orders were sent to China. (Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. 2, pp.362-363)

 

2011515

(Vries 1923, p43)

 

The 'Départ des pèlerins pour l'île de Cythère', or 'The Pilgrims of the Isle of Cythera ' design is directly copied from an engraving published in 1708 by Bernard Picart (1673-1733). Sotheby's New York state that the print by Picart may have been based on a popular ballet or opera and was the later inspiration for 'L'Embarquement pour Cythère', the acclaimed painting of 1717 by Jean-Antoine Watteau (1684-1721) of which slightly later engravings also were made and possibly used as sources for this popular decoration. (New York 2000, p. 112)

 

The original engraving by Picart has the following brief poem:

 

'Que ces Pelerins son heureux

Qu'ils font un voyage agreable

Amour conduit leur pas, Bacchus marche avec eux,

Quá Cythere ils auront bon liet et bon table.'

 

(How fortunate these pilgrims

Who make a happy journey

With love their guide, Bacchus at their side

To Venus' isle, and there enjoy her fare.)

(Vries 1923, p43), (Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. 2, pp.362-363)

 

Cythera is a Greek island, renowned in classical antiquity for its Venus cult. Amor shows the couple the way to the boat that will bring them to the island of love. The first scholar who identified the Picart engraving as the source for this design was De Vries who illustrated the print in 1923; others have since published it as well. Several varieties of this scene with different borders and colour schemes (polychrome and encre de Chine) are known on tea wares as well as on plates and dishes. The same print is copied on Meissen porcelain of c.1730-1735 and it was possibly because of the popularity of this that orders were sent to ChinaSargent states Picart made a series of 60 prints on mythological subjects, which were printed in Amsterdam in 1733. (Vries 1923, p.43), (Goldsmith Phillips 1956, p.137), (Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. 2, pp.362-363), (Sargent 2012, p.302)

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Picart, Bernard (1673-1733)

 

Object 2011869

 

Dish

 

China

 

c.1745

 

Height 25 mm (0.98 inch), diameter of rim 228 mm (8.98 inch), diameter of footring 122 mm (4.80 inch), weight 329 grams (11.61 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on footring with a flat underglaze brown-edged rim (jia mangkou). Decorated in encre de Chinegold and a pink gold wash with a European couple in a landscape of trees with buildings on the far shore and a boat to the left. The man is poised to pour wine from a bottle into a shell the woman holds as a cup. She also holds a staff and wears on her girdle a table with a human figure. In front of the couple and pointing the way toward a boat at the water's edge is a winged amor with a stave and a torch. On the sides an ornamental border design and on the rim scalework panels, cornucopias, strapwork, and trailing foliage. The reverse is undecorated.

 

This design is directly copied from an engraving by Bernard Picart (1673-1733), published in 1708, entitled 'Les Pèlerins de l'île de Cythère' (The Pilgrims of the Isle of Cythera).

 

The rim border design is closely related to decorative patterns of Viennese Du Paquier porcelain. Unique to the Viennese Du Paquier porcelain factory was the laub- und bandelwerk border, based on two series of engravings by Paul Decker (d.1713). Continually modified and varied its essential elements were strapwork, palmettes, trelliswork cartouches, and foliate scrolls combined into a rhythmical pattern of baroque formality. Other China trade versions of the laub- und bandelwerk border, such as the more usual one with the addition of peacock and with panels of quilting rather than trellis- or scale work, are farther removed from their Viennese factory prototypes, and are perhaps derived from Hausmaler variants. (Corbeiller 1974, pp.68-69) 

 

For other identically in encre de Chine decorated objects with the 'Les Pèlerins de l'île de Cythère' (The Pilgrims of the Isle of Cythera) design, please see:

For other identically in polychrome decorated objects with the 'Les Pèlerins de l'île de Cythère' (The Pilgrims of the Isle of Cythera) design, please see:

Condition: Restored.

 

References:

Vries 1923, p.43

Goldsmith Phillips 1956, fig. 44 & plate 55

Beurdeley 1962, cat.122

Corbeiller 1974, pp.68-69

Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. 2, cat. 353 & 354

Boulay 1984, cat. 5

Hervouët 1986, cat. 7.51

Jörg 1989/2, cat. 80 & 81

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1989, cat. 213a & 213b

London 1990, lot 178

New York 2000, lot 254 (one of the two pieces)

London 2002, lot 470

Litzenburg 2003, cat. 155

Sargent 2012, p.183 & p.302

 

Price: Sold.

 

More pictures >>

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Sold Ceramics - Sold Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Western Designers -

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Picart, Bernard (1673-1733)

 

Object 2010267

 

Teacup and saucer

 

China

 

c.1745

 

Height of teacup 40 mm (1.57 inch), diameter of rim 74 mm (2.91 inch), diameter of footring 35 mm (1.38 inch)

Height of saucer 22 mm (0.87 inch), diameter of rim 116 mm (4.57 inch), diameter of footring 65 mm (2.56 inch)

 

Teacup and saucer on footrings, sligthly everted rims. Decorated in encre de Chinegold and a pink gold wash with a European couple in a landscape of trees with buildings on the far shore and a boat to the left. The man is poised to pour wine from a bottle into a shell the woman holds as a cup. She also holds a staff and wears on her girdle a table with a human figure. In front of the couple and pointing the way toward a boat at the watter's edge is a winged amor with a stave and a torch. The teacup is decorated en suite with an orchid (Cymbidium virescens) on the bottom.

 

This design is directly copied from an engraving by Bernard Picart (1673-1733), published in 1708, entitled 'Les Pèlerins de l'île de Cythère' (The Pilgrims of the Isle of Cythera).

 

The orchid (Cymbidium virescens) the 'Lan Hua' is a motif commonly seen on fine Chinese export porcelain of around 1740.

 

For identically in encre de Chine decorated objects please see:

For identically polychrome decorated objects please see:

Condition:

Teacup: Poor old restorations.

Saucer: Poor old restorations.

 

References:

Vries 1923, p.43

Goldsmith Phillips 1956, fig. 44 & plate 55

Beurdeley 1962, cat.122

Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. 2, cat. 353 & 354

Boulay 1984, cat. 5

Hervouët 1986, cat. 7.51

Jörg 1989/2, cat. 80 & 81

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1989, cat. 213a & 213b

London 1990, lot 178

New York 2000, lot 254 (one of the two pieces)

London 2002, lot 470

Litzenburg 2003, cat. 155

Sargent 2012, p.302

 

Price: Sold.

 

More pictures >>

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Sold Ceramics - Sold Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Western Designers -

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Picart, Bernard (1673-1733)

 

Object 2011515

 

Spoon or leak tray

 

China

 

c.1745

 

Height 18 mm (0.71 inch), dimensions 133 mm (5.24 inch) x 83 mm (3.27 inch), weight 59 grams (2.08 ounce (oz.))

 

Spoon or leak tray with hexagonal ribbed sides and a lobed rim with a smooth unglazed base. Polychrome decorated in various overglaze enamels, black and gold with a European couple in a landscape of trees with buildings on the far shore and a boat to the left. The man is poised to pour wine from a bottle into a cup the woman is holding in her hand, in her other hand she is holding a staff. The central decoration is flanked by two orchids (Cymbidium virescens). On the rim a blue enamel border with leaves in gold.

 

This design is directly copied from an engraving by Bernard Picart (1673-1733), published in 1708, entitled 'Les Pèlerins de l'île de Cythère' (The Pilgrims of the Isle of Cythera).

 

On the original engraving the woman is holding a shell as a cup for the wine and she is wearing a tablet with a human figure on her girdle. In front of the couple and pointing the way toward a boat at the watter's edge is a winged amor with a stave and a torch. On this spoon / leak tray, due to it's small size, these details have been left out by the porcelain decorator.

 

The orchid (Cymbidium virescens), the 'Lan Hua' is a motif commonly seen on fine Chinese export porcelain of around 1740.

 

For a sold teacup and saucer, decorated in encre de Chine, please see:

For identically polychrome decorated objects please see:

For identically in encre de Chine decorated objects please see:

Condition: Perfect. 

 

References:

Vries 1923, p.43

Goldsmith Phillips 1956, fig. 44 & plate 55

Beurdeley 1962, cat.122

Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. 2, cat. 353 & 354

Boulay 1984, cat. 5

Hervouët 1986, cat. 7.51

Jörg 1989/2, cat. 80 & 81

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1989, cat. 213a & 213b

London 1990, lot 178

New York 2000, lot 254 (one of the two pieces)

London 2002, lot 470

Litzenburg 2003, cat. 155

Sargent 2012, p.302

 

Price: Sold.

 

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Pronk, Cornelis (1691-1759) 

 

From 1700 onwards, Chinese porcelain with Western depictions became highly in demand. This so-called Chine de commande was made to order for private Western traders, which earned them a lot of money. The Dutch East India Company, (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie, VOC), which had started to actively purchase porcelain in Canton after 1728, also wanted to get in on this specific trade. In 1734, as an experiment, the Dutch East India Company board, the Heren XVII, commissioned the Amsterdam artist Cornelis Pronk (1691-1759) to design depictions for services and other porcelains. He then designed a chinoiserie, a depiction in Chinese style, featuring a Chinese lady at the waterside and a female servant holding an umbrella. These drawings with the designs, which are now known as the Parasoldames (the parasol ladies) were sent to Batavia and from there to China, where porcelain, decorated after this example, was ordered in 1736. The coloured drawn plate design has been preserved and is now part of the collection of the Rijksmuseum Amsterdam. The High Government ordered porcelain conform to these drawings in both China and Japan.

 

Pronk Porselein was manufactured in three versions: in Imari, overglaze enamels as well as in underglaze blue. It was very well received in the Netherlands, however production costs in China proved to be so high that sales earned a minimum profit, which soon caused the Dutch Ears India Company to cease the commissioning of this type of porcelain. Besides the Parasoldames Pronk also drew other drafts: the Vier Doktoren (the four doctors), the Prieel (the arbour) and the Handwassing (hand-washing). Chinese porcelain was manufactured to order after these drawings as well, however its production was later also ceased because it proved to be costly as well. (Source: Groninger Museum)

The 'Parasol Lady', 1736

 

 

 Cornelis Pronk, design for a dish with

 

Cornelis Pronk, design for a dish with "The Parasol Lady" motif, 1734 - 1738, executed in watercolours 19.1 cm x 16.2 cm, Rijksmuseum Amsterdam. 

 

The 'Parasol Lady' was the first design sent to Batavia in 1736. The High Government ordered porcelain conform to these drawings in both China and Japan. There are different varieties done in Imari, overglaze enamels as well as in underglaze blue. 

  

Pronk’s original design shows a lady standing at the water's edge, who is making a gesture with her hands towards three birds on the ground in front of her. On the right, obliquely behind her, stands a maid servant holding an ornate parasol. Interestingly, two of the birds are identified as the ruff (Dutch: kemphaan) and the spoonbill (Dutch: lepelaar), both of which are native to Holland.

 

Pronk’s design source(s) are not known. But already in the early seventeenth century the parasol was used in European chinoiserie  designs as a depiction of the exotic life in the Far East. Figures wearing robes and with an umbrella can also be found in patterns of the famous chinoiserie designer Johann Gregor Höroldt (1696-1775) of the Meissen Factory. Parasols have been known in China for more than 2000 years and are included in the eight Buddhist symbols. Being held above the head of an official, it is emblematic of rank. The Umbrella of Ten Thousand People is also considered a symbol of dignity and high rank and a token of respect and purity. The Daoist Queen of the West, Hsi Wang Mu, is usually depicted with one or two servants holding a fan or parasol. She may also be accompanied by a crane and peaches, both representing eternal life. Another possibility is that Pronk’s design was based on a Japanese source, perhaps a print (ukiyo-e). Women with parasols were a popular subject for the Japanese artists.

 

This particular Pronk design enjoyed great popularity. It is the only Pronk drawing of which various examples exist in Chinese as well as Japanese porcelain.

 

As mentioned Pronk's design of the 'Parasol Lady' was also used on Japanese porcelain. It was not ordered by the Dutch East India Company, (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie, VOC) but commioned by private Dutch traders. On Japanese pieces, the Chinese ladies have become Japanese with their characterristic hairstyles and kimonos. Pronk designs were still in great demand, particularly the Parasol Lady, when VOC orders for this type of porcelain declined. Simplified versions were made at the artists' initiative, where both early Chinese and Japanese versions were used as models. (Jörg 2002/2, pp.144-145)    

 

In Chinese porcelain there are even interpretations of the design by the Chinese porcelain painters themselves, maybe meant for the own domestic market as an exotic item, an 'Europeanerie'. In this case the left lady is replaced by a little boy (‘zotje’ ). Furthermore, the design was also widely copied in Europe, for example by the Venetian Porcelain Factory Cozzi, the Dutch Ouder-Amstel Porcelain Factory and also by Delft factories. At Delft, there were plain white objects decorated with the Chinese version of the Parasol Ladies. Until the mid to late 19th century the pattern of the 'Parasol Lady' was still used on European porcelain, for example at the famous Herendt Factory in Hungary and at the Porcelain Factory of Maastricht, the Netherlands

 

Even more unique, recently a thus far unrecorded clobbered or Amsterdam Bont overdecorated pair of bowls was discovered, were the Delft painter didn’t quite respect the original underglaze blue 'Parasol Lady' design, please see:

2011469
2011469

Sold Ceramics - Sold Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Western Designers -

Page 1

Pronk, Cornelis (1691-1759)

 

Object 2011469

 

Tea caddy

 

China

 

1736-1738

 

Height with cover 125 mm (4.92 inch), height without cover 91 mm (3.58 inch), diameter 70 mm (2.76 inch), diameter of rim 29 mm (1.14 inch), diameter of footring 45 mm (1.77 inch)

 

Exhibited: The World at Home: Asian porcelain and Delft pottery held from 17 June 2017 to 24 March 2019 at the Groninger Museum, The Netherlands.

 

Tea caddy of ovoid form on a footring, domed cover with a pointed knob. Applied scroll work at the spreading foot. Decorated in underglaze blue with the 'Parasol Lady' after a design by the Dutch artist Cornelis Pronk (1691-1759) with a lady besides the water's edge with reeds, gesturing towards three birds on the ground in front of her, and her maid holding an ornate parasol. Round the shoulder a border with flower heads alternating with leafy scrolls. On the cover a honeycomb pattern and cartouches filled with a paddling bird.

  

In total only four underglaze blue tea services were ordered by the VOC. The records of the VOC didn’t specify the component parts of these tea sets. However, usually one or sometimes two tea caddies were part of a tea service, which would mean there probably only were four to maximum eight tea caddies made. This is only the second underglaze blue tea caddy has been recorded in literature thus far. However this one is complete where as the other one is missing it's cover. (Jörg 1982/1, pp. 188-189)

 

For other parts of an underglaze blue 'Parasol Lady' tea service, such as the coffeepot, teapot, sugar bowl etc., please see:

Condition: A glaze rough spot to the knob, a frit to the cover and a restored mouthrim.

 

References:

Vries 1923, pp.8-9

Goldsmith Phillips 1956, cat. 33

Beurdeley 1962, cat. 32-35

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1966, cat. 185

Park 1973, cat. 12 & 13

Corbeiller 1974, cat. 24

Gordon 1977, cat. 72

Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. I, cat. 291

Jörg 1980, cat 7-18 

Jörg 1982/1, cat. 31-35 & cat. 40

Arts 1983, Plate 53a/b

Boulay 1984, p.262, nr. 4

Oka 1985, pp.69-76

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1989, cat. 182

Jörg 1989/2, cat. 45 & 46

Howard 1994, cat. 53 & cat. 57

Jörg 1996, fig. 80

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, cat. 328a/b & cat. 329

Arita 2000, cat. 76-79

Jörg 2002/2, cat. 98 & 99.

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 324 & 325

Litzenburg 2003, cat. 170

Fuchs & Howard 2005, cat. 24

Sargent 2012, cat. 143

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2010734
2010734

Sold Ceramics - Sold Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Western Designers -

Page 1

Pronk, Cornelis (1691-1759)

 

Object 2010734

 

Dish

 

China

 

1736-1738

 

Height 32 mm (1.26 inch), diameter of rim 190 mm (7.48 inch), diameter of footring 115 mm (4.53 inch)

 

Dish on footring, straight underglaze brown-edged rim (jia mangkou). Chinese Imari, decorated in underglaze blue and overglaze iron-red and gold with the 'Parasol Lady' after a design by the Dutch artist Cornelis Pronk (1691-1759) with a lady besides the water's edge with reeds, gesturing towards three birds on the ground in front of her, and her maid holding an ornate parasol. On the sides flower heads alternating with leafy scrolls, on the rim a honeycomb pattern in four rows, four large cartouches with paddling birds repeated from the central scene, and four small cartouches with the ladies from the central scene. On the reverse seven insects in underglaze blue.

 

Dinner services, tea sets and other items with the 'Parasol Lady' were produced in underglaze blue, Chinese Imari and polychrome enamels and sent to the Netherlands in 1737 and 1738. (Jörg & Van Campen 1997  p.282)

 

A complicating factor in dating these iron-red pieces is the fact that the design was ordered again in the 1770s with the same colour scheme, and it is difficult to distinguish between the two groups unless the configuration of the central design or the form of the piece is clearly late 18th century.

 

For identically decorated dishes, please see:

Condition: Two firing fault spots to the centre and two hairlines to the rim.

 

References:

Vries 1923, pp.8-9

Goldsmith Phillips 1956, cat. 33

Volker 1959, Pl. XVIII, cat. 23a, & Pl. XIX, cat. 24 

Beurdeley 1962, cat. 32-35

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1966, cat. 185

Park 1973, cat. 12 & 13

Corbeiller 1974, cat. 24

Gordon 1977, cat. 72

Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. I, cat. 292

Jörg 1980, cat. 20-23 

Jörg 1982/1, cat. 31-35 & cat. 40

Arts 1983, Plate 53a/b

Boulay 1984, p. 262, nr. 4

Oka 1985, pp.69-76

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1989, cat. 182

Jörg 1989/2, cat. 45 & 46

Howard 1994, cat. 53 & cat. 57

Jörg 1996, fig. 81

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, cat. 328a/b & cat. 329

Arita 2000, cat. 76-79

Jörg 2002/2, cat. 98 & 99

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 324 & 325

Litzenburg 2003, cat. 170

Fuchs & Howard 2005, cat. 24

Schölvinck 2010, pp. 52-56

Sargent 2012, p.183 & cat. 143

Castelluccio 2013, Figure 107

Kerr 2015, cat. 161

 

Price: Sold.

 

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The 'Arbour', 1737

 

Cornelis Pronk made his fourth and last drawing for the Dutch East India Company (VOC) in 1737. Unfortunately, the original design has not been preserved. It was sent to Batavia by the Heeren XVII in 1738 and received in Canton in 1739. On the basis of pieces of porcelain still in existence it can be said that the subject of this drawing must have been the ‘Arbour’. The motif on this dish was already described for the first time by Jacquemart & le Blant in 1862, who called it a ‘mariage orientale.’ In its style, detailing and anecdotal character, this decoration is strongly reminiscent of Pronk’s earlier designs and it is generally accepted that it too is by him. Furthermore, its formal composition, with a combination of European and Oriental motifs arranged in a late baroque style, shows strong similarities with Pronk’s first design the Parasol Ladies (please see sold object 2010734), particularly in the depiction of the Chinoiserie ladies with delicate facial features and tall hair coiffures. The climbing roses depicted at either side of the arbour, and the centre right of this dish with scattered flowers among green leaves, are reminiscent of the flowers shown in the tree depicted at the right side of the ‘The Four Doctors’ design. The formal composition of the border around the well is also comparable to the elaborate borders of both ´The Four Doctors’ and ‘The Parasol Ladies’, particularly in the depiction of the birds and fishes and the dense trellis and honeycomb-pattern grounds.

 

Pronk’s immediate source of inspiration for the central composition of this design is not clear. There are late 17th century Frankfurt tin-glazed dishes, which may have been copied from Delft, decorated with a central scene of four figures seated in front of an arbour. The figures resemble the ‘The Four Doctor’s’ from Pronk’s second design, while the arbour is reminiscent to the one on Pronk's 'Arbour' dishes. Another related scene is found on a Dutch Delft dish, also dated late 17th century. 

 

 naamloosnaamloos1

 

(left) Frankfurt, Germany, late 17th century, tin-glazed dish, D. 350 mm (13.77 inch), Troesch Collection, Switzerland. Reproduced from: M. Rinaldi. Kraak Porcelain. A Moment in the History of Trade, London 1989, , pp. 224-225 plate 285. (right) Sold Ceramics - Sold Delft Faience 1640-1730 / Other Earthenware - Delft Faience 1640-173 - Object 2010387

 

However, the most likely source of inspiration is a watercolour and ink drawing by Pronk himself, dated circa 1730. It depicts the tea house ‘Cholon’ in the garden of the estate ‘Bosch en Hove’ near the Dutch city of Haarlem. A similar arbour appears in it, suggesting that Pronk adapted this earlier watercolour for his porcelain design for the VOC. 

  

 naamloos2

  

Drawing, watercolour and ink, c.1730, Cornelis Pronk, Tea House ‘Cholon’ near estate ‘Bosch en Hove’, Haarlem, the Netherlands. Reproduced from Y. Oka, "De herkomst van Pronks porseleinontwerpen", in: Antiek, XX-2, Lochem, Augustus/September 1985, pp.69-76

 

Interestingly, the identical design can also be found on some famille rose tea bowls decorated and produced at the Meissen factory, dated circa 1725-30. In the past this Meissen design has been considered to be the source of Pronk’s ‘Arbour’, however it is more likely that it is after the Chinese version of Pronk’s design. 

 

For a Meissen saucer with this ‘arbour’ design at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, please see: metmuseum.org/collection.

2011768
2011768

Sold Ceramics - Sold Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Western Designers -

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Pronk, Cornelis (1691-1759)

 

Object  2011768

 

Dish

 

China

 

c.1740

 

Height 39 mm (1.54 inch), diameter of rim 281 mm (11.06 inch), diameter of footring 153 mm (6.02 inch), weight grams 575 (20.28 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on footring with a broad flat underglaze brown-edged rim (jia mangkou), heightened with gilt. Decorated in underglaze blue and some gilt highlights with the 'Arbour' design by the Dutch artist Cornelis Pronk (1691-1759). In the centre two Chinese ladies, one seated by a table the other holding a flower under a European leafy arbour with climbing roses. Outside the arbour to the left three Chinese boys, to the right one Chinese boy appears from behind the arbour. Around the arbour a garden with two birds perched in a tree on one side and a flowering rose on the other. In the foreground two ducks on a pond. On the rim twelve oval cartouches containing alternately butterflies, fruit and flowers, reserved on a square-diaper underglaze blue ground. Between the cartouches feather plumes at the inner edge and baroque palmettes/shells at the outer. On the reverse around the rim tasseled lappets in underglaze blue.

 

In total, only three underglaze blue dinner services with the ‘Arbour’ design, of 371 pieces each, were ordered. Based on the Requirements of the VOC, of this particular size probably only twenty-four dishes (eight for each dinner service) were ordered. Beside dinner services the order also describes nine mantel piece sets and tea services and even twelve wall sconces. Curiously, underglaze blue tea wares with this decoration are not known, even though nine blue and white sets were sent. The blue arbour design by Pronk is far less common than its enameled counterpart and therefore quite rare. 

 

For some identically decorated underglaze blue Pronk ‘Arbour’ dishes, please see: 

Condition: A small spot of light crazing to the glaze, rubbing to the gilt decoration and two small firing flaws.

 

References:

Jacquemart & Le Blanc 1862, p.103

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1966, cat. 193

Corbeiller 1973, cat. 30

Corbeiller 1974, Fig. 24

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1974, cat. 202

Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. I, cat. 295

Jörg 1980, pp. 34-37, p. 47 note 51, cat. 48 & p. 80 plate IX & p. 53, appendix 3

Jörg 1982/1, cat. 48

Boulay 1984, p. 262, nr. 3

Oka 1985, pp.69-76

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1989, cat. 184

Jörg 1989/2, cat. 51 & 52

Rinaldi 1989, pp. 224-225, plate 285.

London 1990, lot 110

Howard 1994, cat. 55 & cat. 56

London 2002, lot 417

Litzenburg 2003, cat. 172

Canepa 2005, pp. 51-55, cat.8

Sargent 2012, cat. 146

metmuseum.org/collection.

 

Price: Sold.

 

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Imitations of Pronk Porcelain

 

For the Dutch East India Company, (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie, VOC) porcelain made to order after the drawings by Cornelis Pronk proved not to be profitable enough. Private traders however, saw how well it sold, which prompted them to commission simplified versions. This was the beginning of the production of all sorts of blue and coloured versions of this ware, among others of tea ware and of plates. Quite extraordinary were the Japanese imitations of Pronk Porcelain, which featured Japanese geishas instead of the well-known Chinese parasol ladies. This variant was later in turn copied in China as well. After it arrived in the Netherlands, blue Chinese porcelain was occasionally over-decorated in enamel colours (Amsterdams Bont), whereby the Pronk motif was copied as well. English imitations were seen far into the 19th century, while this motif even appears to have still been applied on Maastricht ware of as late approximately 1900. (Source: Groninger Museum)

2010106
2010106

Sold Ceramics - Sold Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Western Designers -

Page 1

Pronk, Cornelis (1691-1759)

 

Object 2010106

 

Teacup and saucer

 

China

 

c.1740

 

Height of teacup 35 mm (1.38 inch), diameter of rim 70 mm (2.76 inch), diameter of footring 33 mm (1.29 inch)

Height of saucer 19 mm (0.75 inch), diameter of rim 107 mm (4.21 inch), diameter of footring 62 mm (2.44 inch)

 

Teacup and saucer on footrings, everted rims with six small indentations. Polychrome decorated in iron-red, gold, black and various enamel colours with the 'Parasol Lady' after a design by the Dutch artist Cornelis Pronk (1691-1759) with a little boy dancing besides a woman who is holding an ornate parasol. The boy is gesturing towards three birds on the ground in front of him. In the background a fence and rocks with a willow tree. In the sky a bat, in iron-red, in flight. The teacup is decorated en suite

 

On this teaset most of the enamel colours have been burned, probably during the firing process the original enamel colours can still be best seen on the trousers of the little boy on the teacup.

 

The 'Parasol Lady' design became very fashionable and after the Dutch East India Company, (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie, VOC) ceased its orders for Pronk porcelain.simplified imitations soon appeared on the market  Chinese porcelain painters developed their own versions of Pronk's 'Parasol Lady' design, on this teacup and saucer the Chinese porcelain decorator has changed the lady into a little (dancing) boy, a 'zotje' (fool) as Dutch people used to say, the background was also changed and a bat in flight was added. So the design on this teaset is a Chinese version of the 'Parasol Lady'. Remarkable is that this Chinese version later served as an example for a Dutch (Delft) copy of the design. (Jörg & Van Campen 1997, pp.282-283)

 

For identically decorated teacups and saucers, please see:

Condition:

Saucer: One large chip and a hairline to the front of the rim, a small frit with a connected glaze hairline to the reverse rim only visible at the reverse a fleabite to the reverse rim and a frit to the footring.

Teacup: Three very tiny fleabites to the rim

 

References:

Vries 1923, pp.8-9

Goldsmith Phillips 1956, cat. 33

Beurdeley 1962, cat. 32-35

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1966, cat. 187

Park 1973, cat. 12 & 13

Corbeiller 1974, cat. 24

Gordon 1977, cat. 72

Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. I, pp.292-296

Jörg 1980, cat. 28 

Jörg 1982/1, cat. 31-35 & cat. 40

Arts 1983, Plate 53a/b

Boulay 1984, p.262, nr. 4

Oka 1985, pp.69-76

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1989, cat. 182

Jörg 1989/2, cat. 45 & 46

Howard 1994, cat. 53, 57 & 204

Jörg 1996, fig. 80

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, cat. 328a/b & cat. 329

Arita 2000, cat. 76-79

Jörg 2002/2, cat. 98 & 99

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 324 & 325

Litzenburg 2003, cat. 170

Fuchs & Howard 2005, cat. 24

New York 2008, lot 256

Schölvinck 2010, pp. 52-56

Sargent 2012, cat. 143

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2011269 & 2011270
2011269 & 2011270

Sold Ceramics - Sold Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Western Designers -

Page 1

Pronk, Cornelis (1691-1759)

 

Objects 2011269 & 2011270

 

A pair of small bowls

 

China

1730-1740, over-decorated in the Netherlands, c.1740-1745.

 

2010269: height 44 mm (2.56 inch), diameter of rim 84 mm (5.00 inch), diameter of footring 40 mm (2.44 inch)

2010270: height 42 mm (2.56 inch), diameter of rim 85 mm (5.00 inch), diameter of footring 39 mm (2.44 inch)

 

Exhibited: The World at Home: Asian porcelain and Delft pottery held from 17 June 2017 to 24 March 2019 at the Groninger Museum, The Netherlands.

 

A pair of moulded bowls on footrings with straight underglaze brown-edged rims (jia mangkou). Decorated in underglaze blue with the 'Parasol Lady' after a design by the Dutch artist Cornelis Pronk (1691-1759) with a lady besides the water's edge with reeds, gesturing towards three birds on the ground in front of her, and her maid holding an ornate parasol. Overdecorated. in various overglaze enamels, iron-red, black and gold in The Netherlands, Amsterdams Bont c.1740-1745 with on the outside four panels, two filled with a basket filled with flowering plants, hanging ribbons and flying insects, the other two with a fisherman at a riverbank. Around the foot three concentric bands. The bottom is overdecorated with a basket filled with flowering plants, hanging ribbons and two flying insects. Round the inside rim an ornamental border.

 

Pronk´s the ´Parasol Lady´ desgn became very fashionable and was still in great demand when Dutch East India Company, (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie, VOC) orders for this type of porcelain declined. Simplified imitations soon appeared on the market made at the artists' initiative, where both early Chinese and Japanese versions were used as models. These bowls are an example of such a late Chinese variant.

 

This type of over-decorated Chinese and Japanese porcelain was called Amsterdams Bont in 18th-century Holland and varied greatly in quality. Little is known about the workshops where the overdecorating occurred. (Jörg 2002/2, p.160It has been stated that one of the reasons that Chinese and Japanese porcelains were clobbered was to hide existing imperfections. An interesting detail in this regard on object 2011269 is that the Amsterdams Bont decorator painted his decoration on the inner wall precisely over an already existing hairline, this way making it less visible. 

 

Remarkably the original underglaze blue Chinese decoration of Pronk's 'Parasol Lady' has not been respected at all by the Amsterdams Bont decorator. This rather coarse overdecoration in only a few colours of a basket of flowers with insects and the fisherman and a sentry house characterises most Amsterdams Bont over-decorated objects.

 

This underglaze blue representation of the 'Parasol Lady' over-decorated in Amsterdams Bont is extremely rare. Not a single object with this combination of a Pronk's design overdecorated in Amsterdams Bont is recorded thus far.

 

Condition:

2011269: A fleabite, a frit and a hairline to the rim.

2011270: Perfect.

 

References:

Vries 1923, pp.8-9

Goldsmith Phillips 1956, cat. 33

Beurdeley 1962, cat. 32-35

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1966, cat. 185

Park 1973, cat. 12 & 13

Corbeiller 1974, cat. 24

Gordon 1977, cat. 72

Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. I, pp.292-296

Jörg 1980, cat. 27 

Jörg 1982/1, cat. 31-35 & cat. 40

Arts 1983, Plate 53a/b

Boulay 1984, p.262, nr. 4

Oka 1985, pp.69-76

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1989, cat. 182

Jörg 1989/2, cat. 45 & 46

Howard 1994, cat. 53 & cat. 57

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, cat. 328a/b & cat. 329 & 390

Arita 2000, cat. 76-79

Jörg 2002/2, cat. 98, 99 & 113

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 324 & 325

Litzenburg 2003, cat. 170

Fuchs & Howard 2005, cat. 24

Sargent 2012, cat. 143

 

Donated to the collection Oriental ceramics of the Groninger Museum, Groningen, The Netherlands.

 

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2010190
2010190

Sold Ceramics - Sold Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Western Designers -

Page 1

Pronk, Cornelis (1691-1759)

 

Object 2010190

 

Saucer

 

China

 

1740-1745

 

Height 15 mm (0.59 inch), diameter of rim 132 mm (5.19 inch), diameter of footring 65 mm (2.56 inch)

 

Exhibited: The Asian Galleries Reinmagined - Color Across Asia held from 21 December 2016 to 13 May 2018 at the Ackland Art Museum, The University of North Carolina at Chaphil Hill, The United States of America, Object Guide no. 25.

 

Small deep saucer on footring, flat rim. Decorated in underglaze blue with with the 'Parasol Lady' after a design by the Dutch artist Cornelis Pronk (1691-1759) with two women by a reed border at a riverbank, one holding a parasol, the other watching three wadingbirds. On the sides a narrow band with flower sprays alternating with flower heads. Round the rim a honeycomb pattern, separated by eight panels with a paddling bird alternating with a lady holding a parasol. On the reverse seven insects.

 

As mentioned Pronk's design of the 'Parasol Lady' was also used on Japanese porcelain. It was not ordered by the Dutch East India Company, (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie, VOC) but commissioned by private Dutch traders. On Japanese pieces, the Chinese ladies have become Japanese with their characteristic hairstyles and kimonos. Pronk designs were still in great demand, particularly the Parasol Lady, when VOC orders for this type of porcelain declined. Simplified versions were made at the artists' initiative, where both early Chinese and Japanese versions were used as models. This is one such late Chinese variant in Japanese style. Only deep, blue saucers of this Chinese variation on a Japanese style are known in four increasing sizes, for a saucer with a diameter of 156 mm (6.14 inch) please see; Jörg 2002/2, pp.144-145, cat. 99. The body, the glaze and the cobalt blue are unmistakably Chinese. (Jörg corrects an earlier erroneous Japanese attribution based on the Japanese decorative style in his catalogue of 1980. (Jörg 2002/2, pp.144-145, cat. 99)

 

For identically decorated saucers with the Chinese variant in Japanese style of Pronk's design the 'Parasol Lady', please see:

Condition: Two very very tiny pots on the rim, caused by a plopping bubble of glaze during the firing process.

 

References:

Vries 1923, pp.8-9

Goldsmith Phillips 1956, cat. 33

Beurdeley 1962, cat. 32-35

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1966, cat. 185

Park 1973, cat. 12 & 13

Corbeiller 1974, cat. 24

Gordon 1977, cat. 72

Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. I, pp.292-296

Jörg 1980, cat. 34

Jörg 1982/1, cat. 31-35 & cat. 40

Arts 1983, Plate 53a/b

Boulay 1984, p.262, nr. 4

Oka 1985, pp.69-76

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1989, cat. 182

Jörg 1989/2, cat. 45 & 46

Howard 1994, cat. 53 & cat. 57

Jorg 1996, fig. 85

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, cat. 328a/b & cat. 329

Arita 2000, cat. 76-79

Jörg 2002/2, cat. 98 & 99

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 324 & 325

Litzenburg 2003, cat. 170

Fuchs & Howard 2005, cat. 24

Sargent 2012, cat. 143

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2011527
2011527

Sold Ceramics - Sold Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Western Designers -

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Pronk, Cornelis (1691-1759)

 

Object 2011527

 

Teacup and saucer

 

China

 

1736-1740

 

Height of teacup 42 mm (1.65 inch), diameter of rim 72 mm (2.84 inch), diameter of footring 31 mm (1.22 inch), weight 61 grams (2.15 ounce (oz.))

Height of saucer 27 mm (1.06 inch), diameter of rim 117 mm (4.61 inch), diameter of footring 69 mm (2.72 inch), weight 88 grams (3.10 ounce (oz.))

 

A moulded teacup and saucer on footrings with straight underglaze brown-edged rims (jia mangkou). Decorated in underglaze blue with a simplified representation of the the 'Parasol Lady' after a design by the Dutch artist Cornelis Pronk (1691-1759) with two women by a reed border at a riverbank, one holding a parasol, the other watching a bird. On the sides panels filled with insects alternating with flowering plants. The reverse is undecorated. The teacup is decoraed en suite.

 

Pronk´s the ´Parasol Lady´ desgn became very fashionable and was still in great demand when Dutch East India Company, (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie, VOC) orders for this type of porcelain declined. Simplified imitations soon appeared on the market made at the artists' initiative, where both early Chinese and Japanese versions were used as models. This teacup and saucer are an example of such a late Chinese variant.

 

For a similarly decorated teacup / saucer, please see:

Condition:

Teacup: A frit to the rim.

Saucer: Perfect.

 

References:

Vries 1923, pp.8-9

Goldsmith Phillips 1956, cat. 33

Beurdeley 1962, cat. 32-35

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1966, cat. 187

Park 1973, cat. 12 & 13

Corbeiller 1974, cat. 24

Gordon 1977, cat. 72

Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. I, pp.292-296

Jörg 1980, cat. 27 

Jörg 1982/1, cat. 31-35 & cat. 40

Arts 1983, Plate 53a/b

Boulay 1984, p.262, nr. 4

Oka 1985, pp.69-76

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1989, cat. 182

Jörg 1989/2, cat. 45 & 46

Wästefelt et al. 1991, pp. 270-273

Howard 1994, cat. 53 & cat. 57

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, cat. 328a/b & cat. 329

Arita 2000, cat. 76-79

Jörg 2002/2, cat. 98 & 99

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 324 & 325

Litzenburg 2003, cat. 170

Fuchs & Howard 2005, cat. 24

Sargent 2012, p.183 & cat. 143

 

Price: Sold.

 

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201098
201098

Sold Ceramics - Sold Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Western Designers -

Page 1

Pronk, Cornelis (1691-1759)

 

Object 201098

 

Saucer

 

China

 

1750-1775

 

Height 19 mm (0.75 inch), diameter of rim 110 mm (4.33 inch), diameter of footring  65 mm (2.44 inch), weight 55 grams (1.94 ounce (oz.))

 

Saucer on footring with straight sides. Decorated in underglaze blue with a simplified representation of the 'Parasol Lady' after a design by the Dutch artist Cornelis Pronk (1691-1759) with a lady besides the water's edge with reeds, gesturing towards two birds on the ground in front of her, and her maid holding an ornate parasol. Round the rim a trellis pattern border with four reserves filled with flower heads. The reverse is undecorated. 

 

Pronk´s the ´Parasol Lady´ desgn became very fashionable and was still in great demand when Dutch East India Company, (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie, VOC) orders for this type of porcelain declined. Simplified imitations soon appeared on the market made at the artists' initiative, where both early Chinese and Japanese versions were used as models. This saucer is an example of such a late Chinese variant.

 

Shards of a similar decorated saucer were excavated from the wreck of the Swedish East Indiaman Götheborg that ran aground and sunk in 1745 less than a kilometre short of her home port. (Wästefelt et al. 1991, pp. 270-273) For this shard of an identically decorated saucer, please see:

For similarly decorated teacups and saucers, please see:

Condition: Two glaze frits, one to the front and one to the back of the rim, and four tiny fleabites to the reverse rim only visible at the reverse.

 

References:

Vries 1923, pp.8-9

Goldsmith Phillips 1956, cat. 33

Beurdeley 1962, cat. 32-35

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1966, cat. 187

Park 1973, cat. 12 & 13

Corbeiller 1974, cat. 24

Gordon 1977, cat. 72

Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. I, pp.292-296

Jörg 1980, cat. 27

Jörg 1982/1, cat. 31-35 & cat. 40

Arts 1983, Plate 53a/b

Boulay 1984, p.262, nr. 4

Oka 1985, pp.69-76

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1989, cat. 182

Jörg 1989/2, cat. 45 & 46

Wästefelt et al. 1991, pp. 270-273

Howard 1994, cat. 53 & cat. 57

Jorg 1996, fig. 89

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, cat. 328a/b & cat. 329

Arita 2000, cat. 76-79

Jörg 2002/2, cat. 98 & 99

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 324 & 325

Litzenburg 2003, cat. 170

Fuchs & Howard 2005, cat. 24

Schölvinck 2010, pp. 52-56

Sargent 2012, cat. 143

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2010478
2010478

Sold Ceramics - Sold Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Western Designers -

Page 1

Pronk, Cornelis (1691-1759)

 

Objects 2010478

 

Teacup

 

China

 

1750-1775

 

Height 40 mm (1.57 inch), diameter of rim 75 mm (2.95 inch), diameter of footring 40 mm (1.57 inch), weight 46 grams (1.62 ounce (oz.))

 

Teacup on footring, slightly flaring rim. Decorated in underglaze blue with a simplified representation of the 'Parasol Lady' after a design by the Dutch artist Cornelis Pronk (1691-1759) with a lady besides the water's edge with reeds, gesturing towards two birds on the ground in front of her, and her maid holding an ornate parasol. Round the inner rim a trellis pattern border with four reserves filled with flower heads.

 

Pronk´s the ´Parasol Lady´ desgn became very fashionable and was still in great demand when Dutch East India Company, (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie, VOC) orders for this type of porcelain declined. Simplified imitations soon appeared on the market made at the artists' initiative, where both early Chinese and Japanese versions were used as models. This saucer is an example of such a late Chinese variant.

 

Shards of a similar decorated saucer were excavated from the wreck of the Swedish East Indiaman Götheborg that ran aground and sunk in 1745 less than a kilometre short of her home port. (Wästefelt et al. 1991, pp. 270-273) For this shard of an identically decorated saucer, please see:

For a similarly decorated teacup / saucer, please see:

Condition: Two consolidated hairlines to the rim and a restored chip to the rim.

 

References:

Vries 1923, pp.8-9

Goldsmith Phillips 1956, cat. 33

Beurdeley 1962, cat. 32-35

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1966, cat. 185

Park 1973, cat. 12 & 13

Corbeiller 1974, cat. 24

Gordon 1977, cat. 72

Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. I, pp.292-296

Jörg 1980, cat. 27

Jörg 1982/1, cat. 31-35 & cat. 40

Arts 1983, Plate 53a/b

Boulay 1984, p.262, nr. 4

Oka 1985, pp.69-76

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1989, cat. 182

Jörg 1989/2, cat. 45 & 46

Wästefelt et al. 1991, pp. 270-273

Howard 1994, cat. 53 & cat. 57

Jorg 1996, fig. 89

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, cat. 328a/b & cat. 329

Arita 2000, cat. 76-79

Jörg 2002/2, cat. 98 & 99

Jörg 2003/1, cat. 324 & 325

Litzenburg 2003, cat. 170

Fuchs & Howard 2005, cat. 24

Sargent 2012, cat. 143

 

Price: Sold.

 

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Rubens, Peter Paul (1577-1640)

'Cimon finding the sleeping Iphigenia' c.1616-1618 

 

Mrs. Holly T. Bailey at Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia has identified the painting of 'Cimone finding the sleeping Ephygenia' c.1616-1618, by Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640) as the source of the following objects.

 

The story from Giovanni Boccaccio (1313-1375), The Decameron, 5:1 (1348-1353) tells of Cimone, the handsome but uncouth son of a Cypriot nobleman, who falls in love with Ephygenia, and after several turns of fortune marries her. It is purely love that transforms him into a polished and accomplished gallant. The allegory of love's effects remained a popular theme well into the 17th century when a number of Netherlandish painters captured the moment in which Cimon first catches sight of the beautiful maiden asleep. Other pieces decorated with the same scene are known within at least three different borders, including a group of crested wares at Kinross House in Scotland. (New York 2000, p.81) 

  

 'Cimon finding the sleeping Iphigenia' c.1616-1618, by Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640) (source:http://img.posterlounge.de)

2011585
2011585

Sold Ceramics - Sold Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Western Designers -

Page 1

Rubens, Peter Paul (1577-1640) 

 

Object 2011585

 

Bowl

 

China

 

1740-1745

 

Height 63 mm (2.48 inch), diameter of rim 143 mm (5.63 inch), diameter of footring 65 mm (2.56 inch), weight 180 grams (6.35 ounce (oz.))

  

Bowl on footring. Decorated in encre de Chine, iron-red and gold with a representation of 'Cimon finding the sleeping Iphigenia' c.1616-1618 after a design by Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640).

 

According to Jörg the print source of this rare Chine de commande representation is unknown, Hervouët has suggested that it shows Christ discovering his sleeping Disciples in the Garden of Gethsemane. (Matthew 26:36-43) (Jörg 2002/2, p.151)

 

For identically decorated objects, please see:

Condition: A professional restored, re-stuck piece to the rim.

 

References:

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1977, cat. 200

Hervouët 1986, cat. 11.15

New York 2000, lot 186

Jörg 2002/2, p.151, cat. 104

Litzenburg 2003, cat. 179

http://img.posterlounge.de

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2011711
2011711

Sold Ceramics - Sold Chine de commande - Western Subjects 1680-1800 - Western Designers -

Page 1

Rubens, Peter Paul (1577-1640) 

 

Object 2011711

 

Coffee cup

 

China

 

1740-1745

 

Height 56 mm (2.20 inch), diameter of rim 51 mm (2.01 inch), diameter of footring 25 mm (0.98 inch), weight 67 grams (2.36 ounce (oz.))

 

Cup with handle on footring. Decorated in encre de Chine, iron-red and gold with arepresentation of 'Cimon finding the sleeping Iphigenia' c.1616-1618 after a design by Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640).

 

According to Jörg the print source of this rare Chine de commande representation is unknown, Hervouët has suggested that it shows Christ discovering his sleeping Disciples in the Garden of Gethsemane. (Matthew 26:36-43) (Jörg 2002/2, p.151)

 

For identically decorated objects, please see:

Condition: A firing flaw to the handle, a glaze default, frit and two restored frits to the rim one with a connected glaze hairline (only visible on the inside) on the inner wall. Wear to gold and black decoration.

 

References:

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1977, cat. 200

Hervouët 1986, cat. 11.15

New York 2000, lot 186

Jörg 2002/2, p.151, cat. 104

Litzenburg 2003, cat. 179

http://img.posterlounge.de

 

Price: Sold.

 

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