Pater Gratia Oriental Art

Chinese Porcelain

 

Famille Verte 1680-1725

 

Page 1

Several types of polychrome enamelled porcelain were developed from c.1680, during the reign of Emperor Kangxi (1662–1722). The so-called famille verte type, its decoration dominated by green enamels, was particularly popular in Europe from c. 1690–1720. The use of blue overglaze enamel was a new phenomenon, but gold was more frequently applied too. Details and outlines are often in black. It is remarkable that verte is rarely combined with underglaze blue. Apparently, the shaping and firing took place in factories in Jingdezhen that were different from the workshops where the enamelling took place.

Besides dishes, plates and bowls, luxury items such as monteiths (glass coolers) were also made. These Western shapes were modelled after pewter, glass or earthenware models. However, Western shapes occur infrequently, while Western decorations are almost non-existent. The usual Chinese decorations show a variety of flowers, animals, landscapes and figurative scenes. Much famille verte was also made for the domestic Chinese market, not just for export. Therefore, many figural decorations are based on Chinese literary sources, copying the woodcut illustrations in novels and plays. For the Western owner these decorations were nothing more than highly exotic, but for the Chinese there were all kinds of intellectual connotations. Only recently have Western scholars started investigating their meanings. One popular theme used on porcelain was the 'Western Chamber', a love story still popular today. Remarkably, European depictions in famille verte are rare. 

Famille Verte 1680-1725 - Page 1

 

Object 2012052

 

Dish

 

China

 

c.1720

 

Height 40 mm (1.57 inch), diameter of rim 220 mm (8.66 inch), diameter of footring 100 mm (3.94 inch), weight 315 grams (11.11 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on footring, flat, underglaze brown-edged, rim (jia mangkou). Decorated in underglaze blue, various famille verte enamels and gold. In the centre a vase on a stand richly filled with flowering chrysanthemum, pine and peony on a fenced terrace surrounded by a border with six cartouches decorated with a butterfly alternating with a chrysanthemum flower head. The sides and rim with three shaped panels and three flowering chrysanthemums reserved on a underglaze blue ground with scrollwork in gold. The panels are filled with flowering plants, rocks, birds or a butterfly. On the reverse rim a diaper-pattern border with flower heads and six cartouches filled with a butterfly, a fish or a shrimp; on the sides three flower sprays.

 

While making these dishes, the Chinese potters must have been clearly inspired by Japanese Imari examples, similarities in design and technique are obvious. A large Japanese dish of this pattern is in the Museum Boymans - van Beuningen, Rotterdam. The Chinese dishes were made in various sizes, a large, 534 mm (21.02 inch), dish is in the Dresden collection of August the Strong, Elector of Saxony and King of Poland. (Amsterdam 1972. p.35, cat. 111), (Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. 1, pp.144-145

 

The design is known as the 'Stanislaw pattern', named after the Polish King Stanilas Augustus Poniatowsky (r.1764-1795) who, in 1776, had earthenware copies made by the Belvedere factory in Warsaw as a present to Abdul Hamid I, Sultan of Turkey. A large part of it remains in the Topkapi Sary Museum, for this Polish earthenware copy, please see:

For identically shaped and decorated Japanese (c.1700) and Meissen (c.1725-30) dishes, please see:

Jörg suggests that the design served as a model for close copies in Polish earthenware, made for the Polish King Stanislaw II Poniatowsky (r.1764-1795) as additions to his set of Chinese originals. One of these copied earthenware dishes from the Poniatowsky service is now in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. In the late 18th century the design was also copied by the Cozzi factory in Italy. (Ayers, Impey & Mallet 1990, cat. 285), (Jörg 2011/2, p.52)

 

The vase filled with various kinds of flowers, derives from Chinese Kraak porcelain and symbolises riches and abundance. It is seen as an attribute of Lan Caihe, one of the "Eight Daoist Immortals" and patron of gardeners It was a highly popular motif, appearing on many Jingdezhen underglaze blue and polychrome porcelains. (Pinto de Matos 1996, p.273), (Jörg 2011/2, p.60

 

For identically decorated dishes, please see:

Condition: Some wear to the golden decoration and some firing flaws to the base.

  

References:

Amsterdam 1972. cat.111

Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. 1, cat. 126

New York 1985, lot 75

Ayers, Impey & Mallet 1990, cat. 285

Kassel 1990, cat. 139a-d

Pinto de Matos 1996, p.273

Jörg 2011/2, cat. 47

Sargent 2012, p.183

Castelluccio 2013, Fig. 64

London 2014, cat 20

 

Price: € 1.499 - $ 1,631 - £ 1,258

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2010C244
2010C244

Famille Verte 1680-1725 - Page 1

 

Object 2010C244

 

Teapot

 

China

 

1700-1720

 

Height with cover 105 mm (4.13 inch), height without cover 87 mm (3.43 inch), diameter handle to spout 184 mm (7.24 inch), diameter of mouthrim 53 mm (2.09 inch), diameter of footring 57 mm (2.24 inch), weight including cover 452 grams (15.94 ounce (oz.)), weight cover 46 grams (1.62 ounce (oz.))

 

Globular teapot on a footring. Straight spout and a curved C-shaped handle. The inlaying flat cover with round knob. Decorated in famille verte enamels with flowering plants, a large pheasant and two birds in flight. Around the mouth a broad border with four cartouches, each filled with a magpie perched on a branch, on a green-speckled ground with half rosettes. On the cover four flowering branches within a zig-zag pattern border. On the knob a single flower head. The handle and spout are decorated with stylized cloud motifs. The cover has been pierced. To the base a rectangular paper collectors label.

 

Only grown in China and Japan during the 17th Century, tea became known in the Netherlands early because the Dutch East India Company (VOC) shipped small quantities home. Its use as a beverage was established slowly, and was probably started by retired VOC employees who had become accustomed to drinking tea in the East. At a tea party, the expensive beverage was served in small teapots, one for each guest, filled with the leaves of the type he or she preferred. The tea was poured into small cups, while the teapot was refilled with hot water from a metal or sometimes ceramic kettle. The small quantity of famille verte teapots still abound reflects the demand in Europe at the time. Elaborately decorated, they must have been regarded as luxury wares for the upper classes. (Jörg 2011/2, p.131)

 

For identically shaped and decorated teapot, please see:

For a similarly shaped and decorated teapot, please see:

Condition: A firing flaw to the underside of the cover. A large U-shaped crack around the body. A tiny glaze rough spot to the tip of the spout with a very short connected 2 mm (0.07 inch) glaze hairline (only visible on the inside of the spout).

 

References:

Ottema 1943, cat. 225

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1977, cat. 142

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, pp.199-200

Jörg 2011/2, cat. 122

 

Price: € 999 - $ 1.122 - £ 872

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2011838
2011838

Famille Verte 1680-1725 - Page 1

 

Object 2011838

 

Dish

 

China

 

c.1700

 

Height 32 mm (1.26 inch), diameter of rim 217 mm (8.54 inch), diameter of footring 117 mm (4.61 inch), weight 352 grams (12.42 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on footring, flat rim. Decorated in various overglaze famille verte enamels with a bird perched on a branch of a flowering prunus tree. On the rim four panels filled with insects, reserved on a frogs' spawn ground with flowering plants and insects. On the reverse two flowering peony sprays. Marked on the base with the symbol mark: Ding incense burner, in a double circle, underglaze blue.

 

Condition: A sealed hairline and some, professionally restored, frits, chips and glaze rough spots to the rim.

 

Reference:

Davison 1994, cat. 1833

 

Price: € 499 - $ 560 - £ 435

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2012014
2012014

Famille Verte 1680-1725 - Page 1

 

Object 2012014

 

Small vase

 

China

 

c.1700

 

Height 105 mm (4.13 inch), diameter of mouthrim 15 mm (0.59 inch), diameter of footring: 23 mm (0.90 inch), weight 85 grams (3.00 ounce (oz.))

 

Small, pear-shaped, vase on footring with a slightly everted rim. Decorated in various overglaze famille verte enamels with various flowering plants growing from rockwork alternating with three dots and insects in flight. 

 

The decoration on this small vase is similar to that seen on smaller so called "doll's house vases" of identical shape that were made during this same period. This particular small vase is however too large to be classified as a "doll's house vase".

 

Condition: A firing flaw, a frit and a restored chip to the rim, a restored chip to the inner foot ring.

 

Price: € 299 - $ 335 - £ 261

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2011669
2011669

Famille Verte 1680-1725 - Page 1

 

Object 2011669

 

Dish

 

China

 

c.1700

 

Height 40 mm (1.57 inch), diameter of rim 219 mm (8.62 inch), diameter of footring 130 mm (5.12 inch), weight 335 grams (11.82 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on footring, straight rim. Decorated in famille verte enamels, including green, yellow, blue, brown, black and iron-red with a central roundel filled with a flowering aster surrounded by four groups of flowering plants: chrysanthemum, prunus, lotus and peony. On the rim a stylised lattice pattern and four cartouches filled with flowering plants. The reverse is undecorated. Marked on the base with the symbol mark: 'Artemisia leaf', symbol for healing and wealth, in a double circle in underglaze blue.

 

Apart from studying individual flowers and their meanings, it might also be interesting to regard the many flowers and flowering plants depicted on a piece of famille verte as symbolising a grand total, a reflection of a Chinese garden. The Chinese regard gardens as miniature landscapes, where a balance is attained between yin and yang, and the flow of rejuvenating cosmic energy (qi) is evident. (Jörg 2011/2, p.37)

 

For a similarly decorated dish, please see:

Condition: A chip with a connected hairline and some tiny shallow frits and fleabites to the rim.

 

References:

Davison 1994, cat. 1804

Jörg 2011/2, p.37 & cat. 41

 

Price: € 699 - $ 785 - £ 610

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2011937
2011937

Famille Verte 1680-1725 - Page 1

 

Object 2011937

 

Double-gourd vase

 

China

 

1700-1720

 

Height 82 mm (3.23 inch), diameter 41 mm (1.61 inch), diameter mouthrim 6 mm (0.24 inch), diameter of footring 19 mm (0.75 inch), weight 45 grams (1.59 ounce (oz.))

 

Small double-gourd vase with a tall neck on a flat unglazed base. Decorated in famille verte enamels, including green, yellow, black, iron-red and gold with two panels one filled with flowering peony sprays the other with flowering chrysanthemum sprays. Round the shoulder flower heads reserved on an iron-red ground. On the neck two panels filled with flower sprays.

 

At the beginning of the 18th century, there was a fashion among wealthy Dutch ladies to have models made on the scale of a house, the so called "doll's houses". The rooms of these doll's houses were furnished with miniature pieces of porcelain, furniture, paintings, upholstery and all other sorts of objects that would have belonged to the interior of a wealthy home. These doll's houses were very costly and certainly not meant for children to play with but were proudly displayed for friends and visitors and regarded as extremely luxurious items - counterparts of the cabinets of curiosities that were a fashionable hobby of rich men. Only a few of these doll's houses have been preserved. One example can be found in the Gemeentemuseum in The Hague showing an 18th century room with porcelain miniatures in cupboards and on brackets along the wall. In reality the majority of these "miniature doll's house vases" would have been part of the interior. A good example of an authentic porcelain room is the famous cabinet in Pommersfelden Castle, Germany, where groups of pieces on brackets are surrounded by these miniature vases lining the borders of the consoles. (Jörg & Flecker 2001, pp.50-51)

 

For a similarly shaped small double-gourd vase, decorated in underglaze blue, please see:

Condition: A short hairline to the rim.

 

Reference:

Jörg & Flecker 2001, pp.50-51

 

Price: € 199 - $ 223 - £ 173

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2012071
2012071

Famille Verte wares 1680-1725 - Page 1

 

Object 2012071

 

Dish

 

China

 

c.1700

 

Height 60 mm (2.36 inch), diameter of rim 349 mm (13.74 inch), diameter of footring 190 mm (7.48 inch), weight 1,557 grams (54.92 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on footring, spreading sides and flaring rim. Decorated in famille verte enamels and iron-red with a central peony and chrysanthemum spray surrounded by a wide zig-zag lines pattern border. On the sides and rim narrow panels filled with tassels tied with a flower head or with a diaper-pattern. The large panels are filled with various flowering plants, taihu (garden) rocks and birds. Marked on the base with the symbol mark, Artemisia leaf with tassels, in a double circle, underglaze blue, 

 

Condition: Some wear to the iron-red decoration. Two firing flaws to the base and a glaze flaw to the reverse rim. A rough rim with a hairline and some frits and chips. A frit and two chips to the footring.

 

Price: € 699 - $ 766 - £ 592

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2011828
2011828

Famille Verte 1680-1725 - Page 1

 

Object 2011828

 

Dish

 

China

 

1720-1740

 

Height 42 mm (1.65 inch), diameter of rim 342 mm (13.46 inch), diameter of footring 196 mm (7.72 inch), weight 925 grams (32.63 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on footring, flat underglaze brown-edged rim (jia mangkou). Decorated in underglaze blue, various famille verte enamels and gold. In the centre a flowering lotus with a large leaf in underglaze blue with nerves and veins in gold, various other flowers and a tree. The sides and rim with three large shaped panels in underglaze blue with iron-red and gold chrysanthemums, separated by flowering plants growing from pierced rockwork near a fence in enamels. On the reverse two stylized flower sprays.

 

As Howard states the dish is decorated in famille verte enamels, that's why it has been categorised as (late) Famille Verte 1680-1725. The similarity between this dish and object 2012052, that has been dated c.1720, is clear but it is less exuberant decorated in famille verte enamels and it is therefore dated 1720-1740.

 

Underglaze blue ware, overdecorated in iron-red and gilding was one of the palettes first developed in Japan and shipped from the port of Imari to the Dutch trading post at Deshima, and thence to Europe. These designs became known as 'Japanese Imari'. The popularity of this palette in Europe soon ensured that the Chinese copied many of the designs, and such ware is usually referred to now as 'Imari ' or 'Chinese Imari'. A similar design was also copied in faience at the Belvedere factory in Warsaw, Poland c.1776. (Howard 1994, p.58, cat 32), (Ayers, Impey & Mallet 1990, p.253 cat. 285)

 

According to Howard, Bondy illustrates in his K'ang Hsi (pl.157), a similar design in the Dresden collection. (Howard 1994, pp. 46-47, cat. 14 & pp.58-59, cat 32)

 

For identically decorated dishes please see:

For similarly decorated dishes please see:

For a European (Polish), in faience, copy of these types of dishes, please see:

Condition: A short glaze hairline in the centre (only visible on the front). Some wear to the black enamel decoration and some shallow fleabites and frits to the footring.

  

References:

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1974, cat. 312

Howard & Ayers 1978, vol. 1, cat. 126

Ayers, Impey & Mallet 1990, cat. 285

Howard 1994, cat. 14 & 32

Sargent 2012, p.183

 

Price: € 1.299 - $ 1,459 - £ 1,134

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2011839
2011839

Famille Verte 1680-1725 - Page 1

 

Object 2011839

 

Dish

 

China


1720-1735

 

Height 31 mm (1.22 inch), diameter of rim 223 mm (8.78 inch), diameter of footring 116 mm (4.57 inch), weight 322 grams (11.35 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on footring, flat underglaze brown-edged rim (jia mangkou). Decorated in underglaze blue and various famille verte enamels, iron-red and gold with a central flowerspray surrounded by a trellis pattern border with four reserves filled wirh flowerheads. The sides are undecorated. On the rim flowersprays alternating with an orchid. The reverse is undecorated.On the base the remains of a rectangular paper label that reads: 'Fam.vert 1730'  

 

Although the new pink enamel rapidly replaced the green colour scheme after c.1725, famille verte pieces continued to be made, often in a softer palette and with more restrained decoration. (Jörg & Van Campen 1997, p.160, cat. 175) This dish is an example of that group.

 

Condition: Some shallow fleabites and frits to the reverse rim.

 

Reference:

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, cat. 175

Sargent 2012, p.183

 

Price: € 299 - $ 334 - £ 261

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2012076
2012076

Famille Verte 1680-1725 - Page 1

 

Object 2012076

 

A miniature 'doll's house' vase

 

China

 

c.1700

 

Height 58 mm (2.28 inch), diameter 30 mm (1.18 inch), diameter of mouthrim 14 mm (0.55 inch), diameter of footring 15 mm (0.59 inch), weight 26 grams (0.92 ounce (oz.))

 

Moulded miniature 'doll's house' vase on footring. Decorated in various overglaze famille verte enamels with a border of ascending pointed lotus leaves around the footring, on the body six moulded panels each filled with a single flowering stem around the neck two flowering stems.

 

At the beginning of the 18th century, there was a fashion among wealthy Dutch ladies to have models made on the scale of a house, the so called 'doll's houses'. The rooms of these doll's houses were furnished with miniature pieces of porcelain, furniture, paintings, upholstery and all other sorts of objects that would have belonged to the interior of a wealthy home. These doll's houses were very costly and certainly not meant for children to play with but were proudly displayed for friends and visitors and regarded as extremely luxurious items - counterparts of the cabinets of curiosities that were a fashionable hobby of rich men. Only a few of these doll's houses have been preserved. One example can be found in the Gemeentemuseum in The Hague showing an 18th century room with porcelain miniatures in cupboards and on brackets along the wall. In reality, the majority of these "miniature doll's house vases" would have been part of the interior. A good example of an authentic porcelain room is the famous cabinet in Pommersfelden Castle, Germany, where groups of pieces on brackets are surrounded by these miniature vases lining the borders of the consoles. (Jörg & Flecker 2001, pp.50-51)

 

Condition: Perfect.

 

Reference:

Jörg & Flecker 2001, pp.50-52

 

Price: € 199 - $ 212 - £ 170

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2012077
2012077

Famille Verte 1680-1725 - Page 1

 

Object 2012077

 

A miniature 'doll's house' vase

 

China

 

c.1700

 

Height 57 mm (2.24 inch), diameter 30 mm (1.18 inch), diameter of mouthrim 14 mm (0.55 inch), diameter of footring 16 mm (0.63 inch), weight 25 grams (0.88 ounce (oz.))

 

Moulded miniature 'doll's house' vase on footring. Decorated in various overglaze famille verte enamels with a border of ascending pointed lotus leaves around the footring, on the body four moulded panels each filled with a single flowering stem, around the neck two sprays of grasses.

 

At the beginning of the 18th century, there was a fashion among wealthy Dutch ladies to have models made on the scale of a house, the so called 'doll's houses'. The rooms of these doll's houses were furnished with miniature pieces of porcelain, furniture, paintings, upholstery and all other sorts of objects that would have belonged to the interior of a wealthy home. These doll's houses were very costly and certainly not meant for children to play with but were proudly displayed for friends and visitors and regarded as extremely luxurious items - counterparts of the cabinets of curiosities that were a fashionable hobby of rich men. Only a few of these doll's houses have been preserved. One example can be found in the Gemeentemuseum in The Hague showing an 18th century room with porcelain miniatures in cupboards and on brackets along the wall. In reality, the majority of these "miniature doll's house vases" would have been part of the interior. A good example of an authentic porcelain room is the famous cabinet in Pommersfelden Castle, Germany, where groups of pieces on brackets are surrounded by these miniature vases lining the borders of the consoles. (Jörg & Flecker 2001, pp.50-51)

 

Condition: A popped bubble of glaze to the outer footring caused by the firing process and some firing flaws to the base.

 

Reference:

Jörg & Flecker 2001, pp.50-52

 

Price: € 199 - $ 212 - £ 170

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2011379
2011379

Famille Verte 1680-1725 - Page 1

 

Object 2011379

 

Saucer

 

China

 

1720-1740 

 

Height 27 mm (1.06 inch), diameter of rim 122 mm (4.80 inch), diameter of footring 68 mm (2.68 inch), weight 96 grams (3.39 ounce (oz.))

 

Saucer on footring, scalloped sides and rim. Decorated in various famille verte enamels with a single flower head in a concentric band. The sides and rim with different flowering plants growing from pierced rockwork near a fence. The reverse with two flower sprays. On the base a rectangular paper label that reads; 'FAMILLE VERTE, K'ang Hsi (1662-1722)'.

 

2011379 6 label FAMILLE VERTE Kang Hsi (1662-1722)

 

Condition: A frit with a short connected hairline to the rim.

 

Price: € 149 - $ 167 - £ 130

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on their exchange rate to the € price)

 

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2011315
2011315

Famille Verte 1680-1725 - Page 1

 

Object 2011315

 

Dish

 

China


1710-1725

 

Height 28 mm (1.10 inch), diameter of rim 159 mm (6.26 inch), diameter of footring 86 mm (3.39 inch), weight 152 grams (5.36 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on a footring with a spreading rim. Decorated in various famille verte enamels with an insect in flight and a bird perched on a branch of a flowering plant in a single concentric band. On the flattened rim four cartouches filled with two of the "pa pao", the Eight Precious Things; a pearl (beauty) with tassels and a solid lozenge (good luck) with tassels reserved on a trellis diaper and a green-speckled ground (frog-spawn). The reverse is undecorated. On the exterior wall the engraved Chinese character mark  "", meaning expensive or rare. Marked on the base with a square shop mark in a double circle in underglaze blue.

 

2011315 5A

 

The character mark engraved on this dish is, most likely, a personal name or a property brand of a previous owner. It is often seen on objects with a Malaysian, Indonesian or Philippine origin where a Chinese population group was present that used this type of porcelain.

 

Condition: A chip, some frits and shallow glaze rough spots to the rim.

 

Reference:

Lunsingh Scheurleer 1989, p.281, B.

 

Price: € 299 - $ 335 - £ 261

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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