Pater Gratia Oriental Art

Chinese Porcelain

 

Blue and White Kangxi Period 1662-1722

 

Other wares

 

Page 1

Around 1680, Emperor Kangxi (1662–1722) established his authority over all parts of China after a long period of civil strife. The porcelain factories in Jingdezhen that were demolished in 1675 resumed production and within a few years exports were booming. Chinese junks sailed to Batavia, bringing their porcelain to the market. From there, it was shipped to the Netherlands in VOC (Dutch East India Company, 1602–1799) vessels. However, private individuals bypassed the Company and also imported huge quantities of porcelain to Holland. In Europe, a change in dining habits and the introduction of tea and coffee created new demands. New varieties of Chinese export porcelain were produced, including all kinds of Western shapes. Porcelain, sometimes in miniature, was frequently used to decorate house interiors in Europe.

Much porcelain of this period is decorated in a clear, transparent underglaze blue. Popular decorations included the Buddhist lotus motif, a pheasant with long tail feathers on a rock amidst flowers, and the ‘Long Eliza’ with the 'Dancing Fool', the Dutch name for a Chinese lady and a small boy depicted in a garden.

Kangxi porcelain is very well made, with a thin body, a balanced shape and a smooth glaze without impurities. Cobalt blue oxide was subtly applied in varying degrees of saturation, suggesting depth and volume. The colour ranges from a silvery to a deep dark blue; in the best pieces the details and the craftsmanship are amazing. However, due to stricter controls by officials, the freedom and easy way of painting that was so characteristic of the preceding Transitional period now gave way to a more formal style with an emphasis on symmetry and centralism.

2010912
2010912

Blue and White Kangxi Period 1662-1722 - Other wares - Page 1

 

Object 2010912

 

Stem cup

 

China

 

1680-1690

 

Height 45 mm (1.77 inch), diameter of rim 51 mm (2.01 inch), diameter of footring 21 mm (0.83 inch), weight 27 grams (0.95 ounce (oz.))

 

Stem cup on a high splayed foot with a broad, flat footring and a recessed base. Wide cup with flaring rim. Decorated in underglaze blue with a continuous peony scroll. 

 

There is little doubt that the large numbers of small stem cups and wine cups of this size were used in the East for rice wine, while those that reached Europe may have been used for gin. It is likely however, that much of this supply was used in Batavia itself and only relatively small numbers were selected by the supercargoes for Europe. (Howard 1994, pp.186-187)

 

The function of stem cups is not yet clear, but they may have been used for drinking genever (Dutch-gin). The shape is derived from a European glass model. (Jörg & Van Campen 1997, p.264)

 

Condition: A professionally restored, short and long hairline, frits and a tiny (restuck) piece to the rim.

 

References:

Howard 1994, pp.186-187, cat. 214.

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, p.264, cat. 305.

 

Price: € 349 - $ 392 - £ 304

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2012170
2012170

Blue and White Kangxi Period 1662-1722 - Other wares - Page 1

 

Object 2012170

 

Salt

 

China

 

c.1700

 

Height 57 mm (2.24 inch), diameter concave top 48 mm (1.89 inch), diameter foot 74 mm (2.91 inch), weight 129 grams (4.55 ounce (oz.))

 

Salt of hexagonal waisted form on an open base. The inside unglazed, the lower hexagonal part tapering to the waist, the spreading top with a recessed centre, the rim extending downwards. Decorated in underglaze blue with a border of moulded descending lotus leaves alternating with lotus leaf-shaped panels filled with a flower head. Round the waist a border with flower heads and dots. On the rim a border with moulded lotus leaves alternating with lotus leaf-shaped panels filled with a a flower head, on the circular concave top moulded lotus leaves.

 

Modelled after an European pewter or earthenware salt, the material and the Chinese style decoration made this salt an exotic object that was prominently placed on a richly laid table. At this time salts were ordered separately, and only much later as part of a dinner service. With many Christian connotations, salt was an important seasoning at dinner before the 19th century and salts were larger and more elaborate than they are today. (Howard 1994, p.125), (Jörg 2011/2, p.148)

 

Condition: Some discolouration and fine crazing to the glaze, a few firing flaws and popped bubble of glaze, caused by the firing process, and a glaze rough spot to one edge.

 

References:

Howard 1994, cat. 127

Jörg 2011/2, cat. 142

 

Price: € 449 - $ 529 - £ 395

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2012230
2012230

Blue and White Kangxi Period 1662-1722 - Other wares - Page 1

 

Object 2012230

 

Stem cup

 

China

 

c.1700

 

Height 74 mm (2.91 inch), diameter of rim 63 mm (2.48 inch), diameter of footring 31 mm (1.22 inch), weight 86 grams (3.03 ounce (oz.))

 

Stem cup on high, splayed foot with broad, flat footring and recessed base. Wide cup with flaring rim. Decorated in underglaze blue with round the foot with a zig-zag lines-pattern border and on the foot flower heads alternating with lozenge motifs, on the cup six lotus-petal panels filled with leafy branches and various flowering plants.

 

There is little doubt that the large numbers of small stem cups and wine cups of this size were used in the East for rice wine, while those that reached Europe may have been used for gin. It is likely however, that much of this supply was used in Batavia itself and only relatively small numbers were selected by the supercargoes for Europe. (Howard 1994, pp.186-187)

 

The function of stem cups is not yet clear, but they may have been used for drinking genever (Dutch-gin). The shape is derived from a European glass model. (Jörg & Van Campen 1997, p.264)

 

For a smaller and earlier stem cup, please see:

Condition: A shallow fleabite to the footring and a hairline to the rim. The stem cup stands crooked, the footring is not concentric, caused during the firing process.

 

References:

Howard 1994, pp.186-187, cat. 214.

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, p.264, cat. 305.

 

Price: € 349 - $ 394 - £ 311

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2012179
2012179

Blue and White Kangxi Period 1662-1722 - Other wares - Page 1

 

Object 2012179

 

Candlestick

 

China

 

1690-1700

 

Height 42 mm (1.65 inch), diameter of rim 65 mm (2.56 inch), diameter of footring 41 mm (1.61 inch), weight 62 grams (2.19 ounce (oz.))

 

Candlestick on a spreading doomed foot, cylindrical stem, tall sides. Decorated in underglaze blue with two groups of flowerings plants round the foot and a continuous border with flower heads on the cylindrical stem. On the sides two wide spread flower sprays.

 

Candlesticks were ordered by the Dutch as early as the Transitional period and again during the reign of Qianlong, when they were made in the Louis XV and XVI styles, but Kangxi candlesticks are surprisingly rare and thus far only a few varieties are known. Their shapes are derived from silver, pewter or brass models. (Howard 1994, pp.218-219Jörg & Van Campen 1997, pp.258-259)

 

Condition: A chip to the rim.

 

References: 

Howard 1994, no. 254

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, pp.258-259

           

Price: € 749 - $ 849 - £ 644

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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