Pater Gratia Oriental Art

Japanese Porcelain

 

Japanese Imari 1690-1800

 

Imari with no Underglaze Blue, Iron-red and Gold only

 

Page 1

In category 36 'Coloured Imari with no underglaze blue, iron-red and gold only' of his Japanese export porcelain, Impey states that the implication of this singular restriction of palette, without the use of underglaze blue, is that these may be the product of a single enamelling workshop, but may or may not be the product of a single kiln. The restriction is probably one of choice, for it would hardly be cheaper, if at all, to use a wider range of enamels, and no cheaper to use underglaze blue. (Impey 2002, pp.220-221)

2011462
2011462

Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - Imari with no Underglaze Blue, Iron-red and Gold only - Page 1

 

Object 2011462

 

Teapot

 

Japan

 

1680-1700

 

Height with cover 97 mm (3.82 inch), height without cover 77 mm (3.03 inch), diameter ear to spout 144 mm (5.67 inch), diameter of mouthrim 36 mm (1.42 inch), diameter of footring 40 mm (1.58 inch), weight with cover 160 grams (5.64 ounce (oz.)), weight cover 15 grams (0.53 ounce (oz.))

 

Teapot on footring. Slightly bent spout, C-shaped handle. Domed cover with a round knob. Decorated in iron-red, pink wash and gold with on one side flowering peony plants and on the other side flowering chrysanthemum plants. On the shoulder a border of chrysanthemum petals in low relief alternately decorated with iron-red, pink wash and a floret, around the neck a pointed leaves pattern border. On the cover similar chrysanthemum petals in low relief. The handle and spout with florets between scrolls.

 

In category 36 'Coloured Imari with no underglaze blue, iron-red and gold only' of his Japanese export porcelain, Impey states that the implication of this singular restriction of palette, without the use of underglaze blue, is that these may be the product of a single enamelling workshop, but may or may not be the product of a single kiln. The restriction is probably one of choice, for it would hardly be cheaper, if at all, to use a wider range of enamels, and no cheaper to use underglaze blue. (Impey 2002, pp.220-221)

 

For an identically shaped, sized and decorated, sold, teapot, please see:

Condition: A firing flaw to the underside and a hairline to the upper side of the tip of the spout. A chip to the underside of the cover and a glaze chip with connected hairline to the inside of the rim of the cover.

 

Reference:

Impey 2002, pp.220-221

 

Price: € 749 - $ 920 - £ 665

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

More pictures >> 

2012057
2012057

Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - Imari with no Underglaze Blue, Iron-red and Gold only - Page 1

 

Object 2012057

 

Covered jar

 

Japan

 

c.1700

 

Height with cover 225 mm (8.86 inch), height without cover 148 mm (5.82 inch), diameter of mouthrim 75 mm (2.95 inch), diameter of footring 56 mm (2.20 inch), weight including cover 673 grams (23.74 ounce (oz.)), weight cover 143 grams (5.04 ounce (oz.))

 

Oviform jar on footring, recessed base. Wide upright neck. High domed cover with everted rim, the finial modelled as a shishi seated on a rock, decorated in Iron-red and gold with two groups of flowering plants (chrysanthemum and peonny) growing from behind a fence. Onm the shoulder draped curtains tied with ribbons and hanging tassels. On the upright neck florets between scrolls. The cover is decorated en suite, the shishi was lacquered and painted gold in Europe (of which only small spots have remained).

 

In category 36 'Coloured Imari with no underglaze blue, iron-red and gold only' of his Japanese export porcelain, Impey states that the implication of this singular restriction of palette, without the use of underglaze blue, is that these may be the product of a single enamelling workshop, but may or may not be the product of a single kiln. The restriction is probably one of choice, for it would hardly be cheaper, if at all, to use a wider range of enamels, and no cheaper to use underglaze blue. (Impey 2002, pp.220-221)

 

This covered jar might have originally been part of garniture consisting of three covered oviform-shaped jars and two cylindrical beaker vases with spreading mouths. They were very popular in the Netherlands and elsewhere in Europe where they were used as decorative items in the interior. Large garnitures could only be afforded by the nobility and well to do who displayed them in the representative rooms and galleries of their palaces and country houses. They were often placed on specially made pedestals or were mounted and functioned as exotic eyecatchers. Placed inside the fireplace they hid the blackened wall from view in summer and filled with sand, these jars were used as extinguishers near fire-places. (Hartog 1990, p.130, cat 158)

 

The origin of the five-piece set has not been established yet but it seems logical to look to China, which influenced Japanese export wares in so many ways. Transitional pieces, including large covered jars with an enamelled decoration, reached The Netherlands in the 1640s, and clearly had a decorative function in the Dutch Interior. When Chinese production waned, the Japanese took over and from the late 17th century started to make similar jars and beakers in underglaze blue to order for the Dutch. Then, suddenly, they were no longer single objects but parts of five-piece sets. Large scale porcelain production for export was resumed in China in the early 1680s and many new shapes emerged. Apparently, the garniture set was among them. What exactly triggered the change from the single vase or beaker to a set is not known. Japanese covered jars decorated in underglaze blue usually show Chinese elements such as phoenixes, large flowering plants, rocks, and sometimes figures in a landscape setting. Most jars are globular or oviform. They reflect the relatively rare hexagonal and octagonal Chinese pieces, in particular the Transitional jars of the 1640's. The Chinese had stopped producing polygonal jars in the middle of the 17th century. This Japanese preference for any-sided pieces is also apparent in the shape of dishes, saucers and bowls made for export from the late 17th century onwards. Covers of jars are domed and often quite high. The knobs are large and either flattened, round or pear-shaped and rarely facetted as is the case with this jar It is interesting to note that the decoration on the Arita pieces does not imitate some of the specific Chinese Kangxi patterns, such as the characteristic division in bands of panels but show two or three wide panels filled with motifs taken from nature or a free-flowing composition all over the surface. Complete blue-and-white garnitures are extremely rare nowadays, and most existing single vases or jars might in fact have been part of such a set. When the five-piece sets became popular, the blue-and-white pieces were largely replaced by their polychrome (Imari) counterparts. (Jörg 2003/1, pp.259-260

 

Condition:

Jar: Two firing flaws to the body.

Cover: Fine crazing to the glaze and extensive wear to the lacquer and gold painting on the shishi.

 

References:

Hartog 1990, cat 158

Impey 2002, pp.220-221

Jörg 2003/1, pp.259-260

 

Price: € 499 - $ 534 - £ 428

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

More pictures >>

2010662
2010662

Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - Imari with no Underglaze Blue, Iron-red and Gold only - Page 1

 

Object 2010662

 

Teapot

 

Japan

 

1690-1720

 

Height 65 mm (2.56 inch), diameter handle to spout 95 mm (3.74 inch), diameter of mouthrim 16 mm (0.63 inch), diameter of foot 35 mm (1.38 inch), weight with cover 97 grams (3.42 ounce (oz.)), weight cover 14 grams (0.49 ounce (oz.))

  

A pomegranate-shaped teapot on a flat unglazed base. Curved handle and a short straight spout. Imari decorated in iron-red and gold. The original cover is missing, fitted with a custom made, Dutch silver replica of the original cover. Decorated with branches of flowering chrysanthemum and two irregular shaped cartouches filled with coloured dots in relief. Decorated on both sides and on the cover with flowering peony branches, On the handle and spout florets between scrolls. Around the neck a pointed leaves pattern border. The Dutch silver cover has the 925 (purity) mark as the standard mark on articles too small for the full hallmarking.

 

In category 36 'Coloured Imari with no underglaze blue, iron-red and gold only' of his Japanese export porcelain, Impey states that the implication of this singular restriction of palette, without the use of underglaze blue, is that these may be the product of a single enamelling workshop, but may or may not be the product of a single kiln. The restriction is probably one of choice, for it would hardly be cheaper, if at all, to use a wider range of enamels, and no cheaper to use underglaze blue. (Impey 2002, pp.220-221)

 

According to Jörg this teapot has an unusual form for Japanese porcelain. (Jörg 1982/2, p.81)

 

For an identically shaped, sized and decorated teapot with original cover, please see:

Condition: A very tiny fleabite to the tip of the spout and a firing tension hairline to the underside of the handle.

 

References:

Jörg 1982/2, cat. 122

Impey 2002, pp.220-221

 

Price: € 699 - $ 778 - £ 631

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

More pictures >>

2010264
2010264

Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - Imari with no Underglaze Blue, Iron-red and Gold only - Page 1

 

Object 2010264

 

Baluster vase

 

Japan

 

1690-1720

 

Height with cover 119 mm (4.69 inch), height without cover 8.2 mm (3.23 inch), diameter 42 mm (1.65 inch), diameter of mouthrim 9 mm (0.35 inch), diameter of footring 35 mm (1.38 inch), weight with cover 72 grams (2.54 ounce (oz.)), weight cover 7 grams (0.25 ounce (oz.))

 

Six sided baluster vase on footring. Fitted with Dutch silver mounts (marked). Imari decorated in overglaze iron-red and gold with a chrysanthemum and clumps of daisy sprays, around the neck three half chrysanthemum flower heads with leafy scrolls. The silver cover has two marks, 'VK with a half moon, for J.M. van Kempen & Son and the sword mark which was used (1814-1905) as the standard mark on articles too small for full hallmarking.

 

In O. Impey's "Japanese Export Porcelain. Catalogue of the Collection of the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford", Category 36, is devoted to coloured Imari with no underglaze blue, red and gold only. The implication of this singular restriction of palette, without the use of underglaze blue, is that these may be the product of a single enamelling workshop, but may or may not be the product of a single kiln. The restriction is probably one of choice, for it would hardly be cheaper, if at all, to use a wider range of enamels, and no cheaper to use underglaze blue. (Impey 2002, pp.220-221)

 

Condition: There are some sprays of sand over the glaze of the foot probably caused during the firing process, the neck has been shortened and polished.

 

Reference:

Impey 2002, pp.220-221

 

Price: € 199 - $ 210 - £ 142

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

More pictures >>

2010251 & 2010252
2010251 & 2010252

Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - Imari with no Underglaze Blue, Iron-red and Gold only - Page 1

 

Objects 2010251 & 2010252

 

Two saucers

 

Japan

 

1690-1720

 

2010251: Height 21 mm (0.83 inch), diameter of rim 108 mm (4.25 inch), diameter of footring  49 mm (1.93 inch), weight 71 grams (2.51 ounce (oz.))

2010252: Height 20 mm (0.79 inch), diameter of rim 110 mm (4.33 inch), diameter of footring  48 mm (1.89 inch), weight 68 grams (2.40 ounce (oz.))

 

Two saucers on footrings, slightly everted rims. Imari decorated in overglaze iron-red and gold with a flowering wisteria and two quails near a shore. The reverses are undecorated.

 

In O. Impey's "Japanese Export Porcelain. Catalogue of the Collection of the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford", Category 36, is devoted to coloured Imari with no underglaze blue, red and gold only. The implication of this singular restriction of palette, without the use of underglaze blue, is that these may be the product of a single enamelling workshop, but may or may not be the product of a single kiln. The restriction is probably one of choice, for it would hardly be cheaper, if at all, to use a wider range of enamels, and no cheaper to use underglaze blue. (Impey 2002, pp.220-221)

 

The quail, closely allied to the partridge, is an emblem of courage both in China and Japan, as it is highly esteemed as a fighting bird. In North China people made these birds fight under a basket, where millet first had been strewn to make them jealous. Moreover, quails are believed to change into pheasants eventually. On Japanese porcelain they are frequently depicted amidst autumn grasses under millet. This quail and millet design, symbolizing the autumn is especially common on Kakiemon, but is also found on ko Kutani, Imari and blue-and-white wares. It has been suggested that that particular form is copied from the work of the painter Tosa Mitsuoki (1607-1691), but it probably originated from Chinese paintings of the Sung period. This motif has been copied on European porcelain, especially at Bow and Chelsea, where it is used as a decoration on the so-called 'partridge plates', and also on Meissen porcelain. (Arts 1983, pp.134-135

 

Condition:

2010251: A frit to the rim and a few chips to the inner footring.

2010252: A glaze hairline to the exterior wall.

 

References:

Arts 1983, pp.134-135

Impey 2002, pp.220-221

 

Price: Sold.

 

More pictures >>

2011992
2011992

Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - Imari with no Underglaze Blue, Iron-red and Gold only - Page 1

 

Object 2011992

 

Miniature bottle ("doll's house" vase)

 

Japan

 

1690-1720

 

Height 41 mm (1.61 inch), diameter 24 mm (0.94 inch), diameter of mouthrim 6 mm (0.23 inch), diameter of foot 17 mm (0.67 inch), weight 13 grams (0.46 ounce (oz.)), 

 

Double-gourd miniature bottle ("doll's house" vase) on a flat unglazed base. Shaped like a baluster vase. Imari decorated in overglaze iron-red and gold with various flower sprays.

 

This small miniature "doll's house" vase could have been used for the furnishing of a doll's house.

 

At the beginning of the 18th century, there was a fashion among wealthy Dutch ladies to have models made on the scale of a house, the so called "doll's houses". The rooms of these doll's houses were furnished with miniature pieces of porcelain, furniture, paintings, upholstery and all other sorts of objects that would have belonged to the interior of a wealthy home. These doll's houses were very costly and certainly not meant for children to play with but were proudly displayed for friends and visitors and regarded as extremely luxurious items - counterparts of the cabinets of curiosities that were a fashionable hobby of rich men. Only a few of these doll's houses have been preserved. One example can be found in the Gemeentemuseum in The Hague showing an 18th century room with porcelain miniatures in cupboards and on brackets along the wall.

 

In reality the majority of these "miniature doll's house vases" would have been part of the interior. A good example of an authentic porcelain room is the famous cabinet in Pommersfelden Castle, Germany, where groups of pieces on brackets are surrounded by these miniature vases lining the borders of the consoles.

(Jörg & Flecker 2001)

 

In O. Impey's "Japanese Export Porcelain. Catalogue of the Collection of the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford", Category 36, is devoted to coloured Imari with no underglaze blue, red and gold only. The implication of this singular restriction of palette, without the use of underglaze blue, is that these may be the product of a single enamelling workshop, but may or may not be the product of a single kiln. The restriction is probably one of choice, for it would hardly be cheaper, if at all, to use a wider range of enamels, and no cheaper to use underglaze blue. (Impey 2002, pp.220-221)

 

For an identically shaped and decorated miniature bottle ("doll's house" vase) see;

For an identically shaped and similarly decorated miniature bottle ("doll's house" vase) see;

Condition: Two tiny firing flaws.

 

References:

Jörg & Flecker 2001, pp.50-52.

Impey 2002, p.221, cat. 382.

 

Price: € 199 - $ 221 - £ 179

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

More pictures >>

2011789
2011789

Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - Imari with no Underglaze Blue, Iron-red and Gold only - Page 1

 

Object 2011789

 

Miniature bottle

 

Japan

 

1690-1720

 

Height 52 mm (2.05 inch), diameter of mouthrim 5 mm (0.20 inch), diameter of foot 20 mm (0.79 inch), weight 18 grams (0.63 ounce (oz.))

 

Miniature cylindrical bottle on a flat unglazed base, the shoulder tapering into a long, narrow neck. Imari decorated in overglaze iron-red and gold with grasses, flowering plants and insects in flight. 

 

The use of this miniature bottle is unknown, It is too large to be placed in a doll's house. In general, miniatures were included in groups of decorative porcelain placed on shelves, brakets and consoles in the Dutch interior, or in the porcelain rooms of the grand houses such as those still in Pommersfelden and Charlottenburg, Germany. Similar miniature objects were also made of silver and glass, and the pieces of Japanes (and Chinese) porcelain fit into the general trend. (Jörg 2003/1, p.190)

 

In O. Impey's "Japanese Export Porcelain. Catalogue of the Collection of the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford", Category 36, is devoted to coloured Imari with no underglaze blue, red and gold only. The implication of this singular restriction of palette, without the use of underglaze blue, is that these may be the product of a single enamelling workshop, but may or may not be the product of a single kiln. The restriction is probably one of choice, for it would hardly be cheaper, if at all, to use a wider range of enamels, and no cheaper to use underglaze blue. (Impey 2002, pp.220-221)

 

Condition: A shallow glaze frit to the rim.

 

References:

Impey 2002, pp.220-221

Jörg 2003/1, p.190 & cat. 238

 

Price: € 299 - $ 333 - £ 270

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

More pictures >>

2011100
2011100

Japanese Imari 1690-1800 - Imari with no Underglaze Blue, Iron-red and Gold only - Page 1

 

Object 2011100

 

Miniature bottle ("doll's house" vase)

 

Japan

 

1690-1720

 

Height 52 mm (2.05 inch), diameter 28 mm (1.10 inch), diameter of mouthrim 5 mm (0.20 inch), diameter of foot 20 mm (0.79 inch), weight 17 grams (0.60 ounce (oz.)), 

 

Double-gourd miniature bottle ("doll's house" vase) on a flat unglazed base. Shaped like a baluster vase. Imari decorated in overglaze iron-red and gold with bamboo leaves and a single carnation flower head.

 

This small miniature "doll's house" vase could have been used for the furnishing of a doll's house.

 

At the beginning of the 18th century, there was a fashion among wealthy Dutch ladies to have models made on the scale of a house, the so called "doll's houses". The rooms of these doll's houses were furnished with miniature pieces of porcelain, furniture, paintings, upholstery and all other sorts of objects that would have belonged to the interior of a wealthy home. These doll's houses were very costly and certainly not meant for children to play with but were proudly displayed for friends and visitors and regarded as extremely luxurious items - counterparts of the cabinets of curiosities that were a fashionable hobby of rich men. Only a few of these doll's houses have been preserved. One example can be found in the Gemeentemuseum in The Hague showing an 18th century room with porcelain miniatures in cupboards and on brackets along the wall.

 

In reality the majority of these "miniature doll's house vases" would have been part of the interior. A good example of an authentic porcelain room is the famous cabinet in Pommersfelden Castle, Germany, where groups of pieces on brackets are surrounded by these miniature vases lining the borders of the consoles.

(Jörg & Flecker 2001)

 

In O. Impey's "Japanese Export Porcelain. Catalogue of the Collection of the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford", Category 36, is devoted to coloured Imari with no underglaze blue, red and gold only. The implication of this singular restriction of palette, without the use of underglaze blue, is that these may be the product of a single enamelling workshop, but may or may not be the product of a single kiln. The restriction is probably one of choice, for it would hardly be cheaper, if at all, to use a wider range of enamels, and no cheaper to use underglaze blue. (Impey 2002, pp.220-221)

 

For an identically shaped and similarly decorated miniature bottle ("doll's house" vase) see;

Condition: A fleabite and two frits to the rim.

 

References:

Jörg & Flecker 2001, pp.50-52.

Impey 2002, p.221, cat. 382.

 

Price: € 199 - $ 221 - £ 179

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

More pictures >>