Pater Gratia Oriental Art

Chinese Porcelain

 

Chine de commande

 

Armorial / Pseudo-Armorial wares 1700-1800

 

Page 1

 

Chine de comande - Armorial / Pseudo-Armorial wares 1700-1800 objects are, if available, categorized in the following alphabetical order:

  • Armorial
  • Pseudo-Armorial

 

Armorial

Armorial porcelain forms a special group within Chine de commande. Made especially for Eastern markets, this porcelain was decorated with the coats of arms of European families, cities or towns. The first armorial porcelain was produced for the Portuguese market around 1540. The Dutch started ordering armorial porcelain in 1700 when they replaced the Portuguese as the main porcelain traders in Asia in circa 1630. These objects were originally manufactured in the style of blue-and-white Kraak porcelain; when enamel colours were developed later, these were also applied. This porcelain could be ordered to specification in China. Tableware with a family coat of arms was a treasured possession that enhanced the status of the owner. (Source: Keramiek Museum Princessehof, Leeuwarden)

2010858 & 2010859
2010858 & 2010859

Chine de commande - Armorial / Pseudo-Armorial wares 1700-1800 - Armorial - British - Page 1

 

Objects 2010858 & 2012859

 

Teapot with cover and stand

 

China

 

c.1760

 

Provenance: Polly Latham, Boston, USA.

 

Teapot with cover: height (with cover) 132 mm (5.19 inch), height (without cover) 94 mm (3.70 inch), diameter handle to spout 195 mm (7.68 inch), diameter of mouthrim 64 mm (2.52 inch), diameter of footring 64 mm (2.52 inch), weight with cover 415 grams (14.64 ounce (oz.)), weight cover 72 grams (2.54 ounce (oz.))

 

Stand: height 23 mm (0.91 inch), dimensions 119 mm (4.69 inch) x 130 mm (5.12 inch), weight cover 109 grams (3.84 ounce (oz.))

 

Teapot of globular shape on footring, straight spout with a curved C-shaped handle. Domed cover and pointed knob. Polychrome decorated in yellow, rose, red, blue, green and white overglaze enamels, black / grisaille and gold with an the Arms of Crichton of Ruthven in Scotland, Argent a lion rampant azure armed and langued gules on a chief of the second three lozenges of the first; crest, a pillar argent; motto 'Stand sure'; impaling Freke, Sable two bars and in chief three mullets or, flanked by flower sprays. Round the rim a spearhead-pattern border. On the cover two flower sprays with a spearhead-pattern border round the rim. On the base an oval paper dealer label that reads: 'Polly Latham' with the handwritten number; 3762 in black ink.

 

Hexagonal teapot stand or saucer dish with spreading upright sides, a deeply scalloped rim and a flat unglazed base with adhering kiln sand. Used as teapot or milk jug stand. Polychrome decorated in yellow, rose, red, blue, green and white overglaze enamels, black / grisaille and gold with an the Arms of Crichton of Ruthven in Scotland, Argent a lion rampant azure armed and langued gules on a chief of the second three lozenges of the first; crest, a pillar argent; motto 'Stand sure'; impaling Freke, Sable two bars and in chief three mullets or, flanked by flower sprays. On the rim a spearhead-pattern border. On the base of the stand an oval paper dealer label that reads: 'Polly Latham' 

 

The Crichtons of Ruthven are a cadet branch of the Crichtons of Crichton. There are two services with Crichton alone. It seems most probable that this branch of the family were connected with the East India Company; probably marrying a Freke of Melcombe in Dorset, or Hannington in Wiltshire. Patrick Crichton was first officer on the East Indiaman 'Earl of Elgin' at Canton in 1764. See chapter on the Earl of Elgin in Geoffrey Godden's book on Chinese export porcelain. This is also possibly for a daughter of Mr. S. Freke, Governor of Bengal from 1733 to 1738.

The Freke family, bearing these arms, are descended from Robert Freke of Shorton in Dorset - Teller of the Exchequer in the reigns of Henry VIII and Queen Elizabeth. (Howard 1974, p. 453, cat. P16)

 

 There is a cup and saucer with identically armorial design (No.827+) in the British Museum and in April 1969 Sotheby's sold two plates and in 1970 a teapot, stand and teapoy with identically armorial design. (Howard 1974, p.453, cat. P16)

 

For an Illustration of a (tea) bowl from the Clive Rouse Collection with identical armorial design please see:

For an Illustration of a dish from the Phil. Cooke Collection with identical armorial design please see:

For an Illustration of a milk jug with the Crichton armorial design in encre de Chine please see:

For an Illustration of a dish with the Crichton armorial design in underglaze blue please see:

For an Illustration of a dish with the Erdeswick quarterly impaling Crichton armorial design in underglaze blue please see:

Condition teapot: A firing flaw to the inner footring.

Condition stand: Two popped bubbles of glaze, caused by the firing process, to the rim.

 

References:

Howard 1974, cat. P16 & R5

Howard 2003, cat L5 & R2 & R5

 

Price: € 2,999 - $ 3,560 - £ 2,560

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2012202
2012202

Chine de commande - Armorial / Pseudo-Armorial wares 1700-1800 - Armorial - Page 1

 

Object 2012202

 

Teacup and saucer

 

China

 

c.1775-1780

 

Provenance: Suchow & Seigel, New York City, Fine Antiques est.1968.

 

Height of teacup 49 mm (1.93 inch), diameter of rim 88 mm (3.46 inch), diameter of footring 42 mm (1.65 inch), weight 72 grams (2.54 ounce (oz.))

Height of saucer 30 mm (1.18 inch), diameter of rim 140 mm (5.51 inch), diameter of footring 84 mm (3.31 inch), weight 107 grams (3.77 ounce (oz.))

 

Teacup and saucer on footrings, straight rims. Decorated in various overglaze enamels, iron-red, black and gold with two coats of arms accolée The shields are in a rococo style cartouche edged by scrollwork, flower festoons and shells above a gold coronet and surrounded by four flower sprays in European style. Round the rims a framework of deutsche blumen (German flowers) joined by fonds of bamboo. The teacup is decorated en suite. On the base of the saucer an oval paper dealers label that reads: Suchow & Seigel, New York City, Fine Antiques est.1968 and a crossed out old hand written collectors number / museum inventory number (201974d) in red. On the base of the teacup an oval paper dealers label that reads: Suchow & Seigel, New York City, Fine Antiques est.1968 and a crossed out old hand written collectors number / museum inventory number (201974-9L) in red.

 

Decorated with two coats of arms accolée. The dexter side is quarterly, 1. and 4. on a blue background a silver swan; 2. and 3. on a gold background three black cauldrons (two-one) on a gold background three cauldrons (two-one). The arms at the sinister side have two gold millrinds, in a quarter on a gold background a walking lion.

 

The dexster arms are those of Van de Leur, borne by an ancestor of the Krayenhoff van de Leur line, Anna Jacoba van de Leur (1747-1785), as shown on her tomb in Ceylon. She married in 1769 Cornelius Dionysius Krayenhoff (1744-1792) who was a senior merchant and director of Galle and Mature, Ceylon. The armorial quarters of Dick Arnold Krayenhoff van de Leur are those of Krayenhoff van de Leur - Loke, Krayenhoff van de Leur - Kolff, Loke - Muntz and Krayenhoff - Van de Leur.

However the sinister arms remain unidentified as none of those family arms resemble the millrinds and lion quarter which were, however, borne by at least six armigerous families, all from the province of North Brabant; Gommaerts or Gommers, Van der Hoeven (Heusden and Vrijhoeve, 18th century), Coenen, Nolleken, (Rover) van der Poorten and De Rode, the latter four in 's-Hertogenbosch during the 15th century.

The Van de Leur family is also from Brabant descending from Philippus van de Leur who was a wine merchant in Bergen op Zoom in the early 18th century. His son was appointed schout or bailiff of villages and small towns in western Brabant and Zeeland, such as Oude Tonge, Prinsenland and Willemstad. Philippus' son, Jacob van de Leur (born 1717), a bailiff and dike reeve of Willemstad (1749) was the father of Anna Jacoba who married into the Krayenhoff family. (Kroes 2007, p.523)

 

Kroes states that a (Chinese?) porcelain service with two coats of arms accolée was, in 1927, in the collection of Dirk Arnold Krayenhoff van de Leur (1855-1939) in the Dutch city Haarlem.

 

Condition teacup: Perfect.

Condition saucer: Perfect with slight wear to the golden decoration.

 

Reference:

Kroes 2007, p. 523

 

Price: € 749 - $ 894 - £ 640

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2012224
2012224

Chine de commande - Armorial / Pseudo-Armorial wares 1700-1800 - Armorial - Page 1

 

Object 2012224

 

Cup

China

c.1720

 

Height 62 mm (2.44 inch), diameter of rim 57 mm (2.24 inch), diameter of footring 26 mm (1.02 inch), weight 90 grams (3.17 ounce (oz.))

 

Cup with handle on footring. Decorated in iron-red, blue, purple and (unusual) lime green enamels and gold with the arms and crest of Sir John Lambert, Bt., the reverse with a basket with ribbons and tassels filled with finger-lemon fruit also called 'Buddha's-hand citron (Citrus medica), divided by a flywhisk and ruyi sceptre (Daoist symbols) amongst flowers prays. Round the foot and inner rim a spiked palings border and on the outer rim a foliage border. On the base an old rectangular paper label.

 

The arms are those of Sir John Lambert, created a baronet in 1711. One of the twenty-eight directors of the South Sea Company, founded the same year, Lambert became wealthy by his unscrupulous handling of the company's affairs. He was involved in the selling of fictitious stock, bribing royal mistresses with shares at favourable rates, and juggling the books. His name also occurs in Dutch accounts as agent for speculators in Amsterdam. Lambert tried to cash in on the bubble mania by proposing a company of his own, a whale fishery in Greenland but this was in July 1720: the South Sea Bubble was about to burst, and his petition was refused. The directors were held responsible for the collapse, and after a public inquiry their estates were confiscated. Of this newly acquired wealth valued at 72,508 GPB, Lambert lost all but 5,000 GBP. He died in February 1723. (Corbeiller 1974, p.46)

 

The service to which the octagonal dish in China Trade Porcelain: Patterns of Exchange, (C. le Corbeiller, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York 1974), pp.46-47, cat. 20 belongs is typical of the armorial wares made for the English and French markets between about 1720 and 1730. The decoration at this comparatively early stage of the porcelain trade was still essentially Oriental, the European armorials in no way interfering with the traditional K'ang Hsi arrangement of borders and symbols. The Lambert service, which must date before 1723 and was probably ordered at the height of Sir John's financial success or about 1720, appears to be the earliest of this type. All comparable and datable services fall within the ensuing decade. Although the decorative style of export porcelains showed little Western influence at this period, the shapes of individual pieces were generally copied from contemporary examples in silver; the moulding on the rim of the octagonal dish (cat.20) offers further confirmation of this point, as does the inclusion in the Lambert service of a tazza, one of the few known to exist in China trade porcelain. (Corbeiller 1974, p.46)

  

This cup proves, that besides the Lambert armorial service, Sir John Lambert, Bt. must also have ordered an armorial tea / coffee service, no other object from this tea / coffee service seems to be recorded at this time.

 

For other objects decorated arms, crest and motto of Sir John Lambert, Bt., please see:

Condition: Perfect.

 

References:

Corbeiller 1974, cat. 20

Howard 1974, p.206, no. D2

London 1988, cat. 82 & 87

New York 2000, lot 279

Howard 2003, p.141, D2

 

Price: € 599 - $ 670 - £ 523

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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Pseudo-Armorial

Pseudo-armorials are those emblems and signs which only resemble a coat of arm by using heraldic components such as a shield shape and/or banners, spears, flying angels etc. that surround the monogram or cipher. Chine de commande was expensive, made in limited amounts and was almost always ordered privately.

2011365C
2011365C

Chine de commande - Armorial / Pseudo-Armorial wares 1700-1800 - Pseudo-Armorial - Page 1

 

Object 2011365C

 

Saucer

 

China

 

c.1720-1740

 

Height 24 mm (0.94 inch), diameter of rim 140 mm (5.51 inch), diameter of footring 71 mm (2.80 inch), weight 143 grams (5.04 ounce (oz.))

 

Saucer on footring with straight rim with slightly flaring edge. Chinese Imari, decorated in underglaze blue, iron-red and gold with in the centre a roundel filled with a single flower spray on the sides and rim flowering peonies alternating with double headed eagles.

 

In 1565, the Philippine Islands were conquered by an expedition that included six Spanish Augustinian friars under the supervision of Father Andres de Urdaneta, who established several missions in the Archipelago. According to Augustinian sources, after the discovery of the Holy Child of Cebu (an image thought to be miraculous), King Philip II of Spain (1556-98), granted the privilege to the Augustinians of the Philippine Islands to make use of his ensign, the double headed eagle from the Hapsburg in their emblem. (Welsh 2003, p.18)

 

The double headed eagle is the emblem of the Spanish Catholic Order of St. Augustine and it is very likely that this saucer, as part of a chocolate beaker and cover set was ordered by the Augustinian Fathers. 

 

An article in The Oriental Ceramic Society of the Philippine, June 2007 on The Pacific route of Ceramic trade: the Commercial Flow of Oriental Ceramics between Asia and Latin America by Etsuko Miyata and Risuko Yajima, focusses on their findings of the study about Chinese ceramics traded through galleons via Manila to the New World (Mexico) in the 16th-19th centuries. The research was conduted in Zócalo area, Mexico City in 2006. The excavated pieces dated from the late Jiajing period (1522-1566) to the 18th century. Amongst the 18th century objects excavated was a sherd of an overglaze bowl (read beaker) with a double headed-eagle drawn on the exterior wall. Special orders with emblems by the Portuguese Kings, nobles, and religious orders are known from the 15th century, some of which can be seen among the Portuguese collection today. This emblem probably depicts that of Hapsburg (1510-1700) or the Augustinian order, though in any case, it dates back to the early 18th century at the latest. (The Oriental Ceramic Society of the Philippines, June 2007

 

For other objects decorated with the double headed eagle emblem of the Spanish Catholic Order of St. Augustine, please see:

Cocoa was first brought to Europe by the Spaniards from Mexico in the 1st half of the 16th century. From Spain the cocoa beans were traded to Italy and The Netherlands, First used as a medicine, later at the end of the 17th century it was consumed as a pleasure drink. (Jörg & Van Campen 1997, p.116)

 

Condition: Two firing flaws and a frit to the rim.

 

References:

Jörg & Van Campen 1997, cat. 117

Mudge 2000, cat. 5o & 52

Welsh 2003, cat. 1

The Oriental Ceramic Society of the Philippines, June 2007

 

Price: € 399 - $ 478 - £ 346

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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More pictures of object 2011365B, another identically, shaped, sized and decorated, sold, saucer >>

2012187
2012187

Chine de commande - Armorial / Pseudo-Armorial wares 1700-1800 - Pseudo-Armorial - Page 1

 

Object 2012187

 

Teacup and saucer

 

China

 

1765-1775

 

Provenance: Van der Ven & Van der Ven Antiquairs, 's-Hertogenbosch, The Netherlands.

 

Height of teacup 39 mm (1.54 inch), diameter of rim 65 mm (2.56 inch), diameter of footring 31 mm (1.22 inch), weight 37 grams (1.31 ounce (oz.))

Height of saucer 26 mm (1.02 inch), diameter of rim 106 mm (4.17 inch), diameter of footring 61 mm (2.40 inch), weight 62 grams (2.19 ounce (oz.))

 

Teacup and saucer on footrings, straight rims. Polychrome decorated in iron-red, black and green overglaze enamels and gold. In the centre there are two monogrammed ovals linked above by a knotted ribbon with a tassel, surrounded by palms and garlands. In the dexter oval, gilt letters are painted in handwriting with the initials 'PR', the sinister oval has the initial's 'CVE'. Below the ovals, in the middle, an animal's head. On the sides four groups of flowering branches. Round the rim a border with leafy branches and flower heads. The reverse is undecorated. The teacup is decorated en suite. On the base of the saucer a rectangular silver paper dealers label with the printed text: 'VAN DER VEN & VAN DER VEN ANTIQUAIRS 'S-Hertogenbosch CHINEES PORSELEIN CH'IEN LUNG PERIODE 1736 - 1795'. 

 

Much Chinese export porcelain made for the Dutch market has a pseudo-armorial character, the most notable and largest group being monogrammed porcelain. Monograms are initials, often finely painted in the shape of a mirror monogram or cipher. A mirror monogram is a design of a monogram where the letters are reversed to make mirror images to produce an ornamental form. The word cipher is more or less synonymous with mirror monogram the with the emphasis on encrypting text with a combination of symbolic letters in an entwined weaving of letters.

Monograms and ciphers are mainly personal as opposed to coats of arms that beside by individuals can also be borne by whole families and communities. Pseudo-armorials are those emblems and signs which only resemble a coat of arm by using heraldic components such as a shield shape and/or banners, spears, flying angels etc. that surround the monogram or cipher. (Kroes 2007, p.56)

  

Condition teacup: A hairline to the rim.

Condition saucer: Perfect.

 

Reference:

Kroes 2007, p.56

  

Price: € 299 - $ 352 - £ 266

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2012007
2012007

Chine de commande - Armorial / Pseudo-Armorial wares 1700-1800 - Pseudo-Armorial - Page 1

 

Object 2012007

 

Saucer

 

China

 

1730-1750

 

Height 24 mm (0.95 inch), diameter of rim 133 mm (5.24 inch), diameter of footring 79 mm (3.11 inch), weight 72 grams (2.54 ounce (oz.))

 

Saucer on footring, straight rim. Decorated in 'encre de Chine', gold, iro-red  and green and blue enamel with a central pseudo-Armorial monogram design within a wreath of leaves surmounted by a coronet, on the sides five groups of leafy scrolls. Round the rim a wave-pattern border. The reverse is undecorated.

 

Monograms and ciphers are mainly personal as opposed to coats of arms that beside by individuals can also be borne by whole families and communities. Pseudo-armorials are those emblems and signs which only resemble a coat of arm by using heraldic components such as a shield shape and/or banners, spears, flying angels etc. that surround the monogram or cipher. (Kroes 2007, p.56)

 

Condition: A popped bubble of glaze caused during the firing process and a fleabite to the rim, two Y-shaped hairlines to the base.

 

Reference:

Kroes 2007, p.56

 

Price: € 299 - $ 335 - £ 261

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2011564
2011564

Chine de commande - Armorial / Pseudo-Armorial wares 1700-1800 - Pseudo-Armorial - Page 1

 

Object 2011564

 

Teacup and saucer

 

China

 

1760-1770

 

Height of teacup 42 mm (1.65 inch), diameter of rim 76 mm (2.99 inch), diameter of footring 40 mm (1.58 inch), weight 52 grams (1.83 ounce (oz.))

Height of saucer 29 mm (1.14 inch), diameter of rim 120 mm (4.72 inch), diameter of footring 70 mm (2.76 inch), weight 91 grams (3.21 ounce (oz.))

 

Teacup and saucer on footrings, straight rims. Decorated in various famille rose enamels with gold. Both teacup and saucer with a monogrammed oval surmounted by a coronet surrounded by European scrollwork with hanging flowers. In the oval the cipher 'CMD'. On the sides four groups of flowering branches. It is, until now, unknown to who this cipher refers.

 

At a young age G.A.H. Buisman became the heir to the family firm. Like his father who built an extensive collection of Chine de commande porcelain, G.A.H. Buisman also developed an expert's eye for porcelain. According to his wishes his collection of Chinese and Japanese porcelain depicting Dutch family armorials were to be sold at auction. It was sold as, 'European Noble and Private Collections, Including the G A.H. Buisman Jzn. Chinese Armorial Porcelain Collection' by Christie's Amsterdam, sale 2691, on 14.15 & 16 February 2006. In this sale lot 1103, consisted of four identically decorated famille rose 'monogrammed' cups and saucers. please see: 

For more information on G.A.H. Buisman Jzn, please see:

Condition teacup: Perfect.

Condition saucer: Perfect.

  

Reference:

Amsterdam 2006, lot 1103

 

Price: € 499 - $ 560 - £ 435

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2011822
2011822
Chine de commande - Armorial / Pseudo-Armorial wares 1700-1800 - Pseudo-Armorial - Page 1
 
Object 2011822

 

Dish

 

China

 

1770-1790

 

Height 28 mm (1.10 inch), diameter of rim 242 mm (9.53 inch), diameter of footring 136 mm (5.35 inch), weight 451 grams (15.91 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on footring, flat rim with a scalloped edge. Polychrome decorated in various overglaze enamels and iron-red and gold. Initialled in the centre with flowering branches and a butterfly forming the initials 'W M J'  on the sides a framework of deutsche blumen (German flowers) joined by fonds of bamboo. On the rim six cartouches filled with deutsche blumen (German flowers) on a white enamelled bianco sopra bianco diaper pattern ground. The reverse is undecorated 

 

In the 18th century the Dutch, the British and, later on, the other European trading nations begin ordering armorial porcelains. Coats-of-arms were now ever increasingly decorated in overglaze colours in dedicated workshops stocked with wares to which a range of borders had been applied. These custom jobs cost many times more than the standard ware and were generally ordered by private traders who rented space on East India company ships. Company captains and officers were likewise inclined to garner a service with their own arms. Initialled porcelain was particularly popular in Scandinavia. (Emden 2015/1, p.108)

 

For a similarly decorated drinking service with the initials 'WB', please see:

Condition: Some wear to the decoration, a fleabite, two frits, two chips and a hairline to the rim.

 

References:

Godden 1979, cat. 129.

Emden 2015/1, p.108 & cat. 88

 

Price: € 299 - $ 335 - £ 261

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2011010
2011010

Chine de commande - Armorial / Pseudo-Armorial wares 1700-1800 - Pseudo-Armorial - Page 1

 

Object 2011010

 

Saucer

 

China

 

c.1790

 

Height 12 mm (0.47 inch), diameter of rim 82 mm (3.23 inch), diameter of footring 46 mm (1.81 inch), weight 111 grams (3.91 ounce (oz.))

 

Saucer on footring, straight rim. Polychrome decorated in overglaze blue enamel, iron-red, black and gold with a spade-shaped shield filled with a gold floral branch; the crest two doves looking at each other. It is surrounded by curtain-like mantling with tassels and knotted ribbon in blue and gold enamels encircled by a concentric wavy dark blue enamel line. Around the rim a floral scroll pattern border.

 

The form of the shield and the mantling points to a date in or after the 1790's.The spaded shield was particularly popular in the English market. This saucer was most likely part of a pseudo-armorial coffee and tea service with the doves referring to love. Several varieties of these pseudo-armorial services were made. The floral branch as an heraldic emblem was borne by some Dutch families, however, it was probably ordered by someone who was not armigerous, perhaps for a wife as an expression of love. (Kroes 2007, p.491)

 

At the end of the eighteenth, begin of the nineteenth-century armorials tended to shrink to a crest alone, possibly in favour of more democratic sentiments. A generic crest, nuptial birds, became a favourite even for distinguished citizens such as Bishop William White (1748-1836) of Philadelphia. (Mudge 2000, p.66)

 

At this time the porcelain came in quantity from Jingdezhen via Nanking and thence by sea, and was enamelled with standardized shields. These shields were completed, to special European order, with initials or a crest (or in this case the generic crest of two nuptial birds) to special order as part of a commissioned coffee or tea services, in workshops of Canton. This could be added quickly so that orders could return on the ships that brought them. Supercargoes would fulfil commissions for tea services from private clients and European and American China shops. (Howard 1994, p.153 &  p.159)

 

For similarly decorated object, please see:

Condition: A firing flaw with two connected glaze hairlines both only visible on the base.

 

References:

Howard 1994, cat. 166 & 174

Mudge 2000, cat. 93

Kroes 2007, cat.no. 411

 

Price: € 249 - $ 279 - £ 217

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2012142
2012142

Chine de commande - Armorial / Pseudo-Armorial wares 1700-1800 - Pseudo-Armorial - Page 1

 

Object 2012142

 

Saucer

 

China

 

c.1800

 

Height 28 mm (1.10 inch), diameter of rim 128 mm (5.04 inch), diameter of footring 75 mm (2.95 inch), weight 81 grams (2.86 ounce (oz.))

 

Saucer on footring, straight rim. Decorated in various overglaze enamels and gold with the crest and moto of Robertson, A dexterhand erect holding in the hand an imperial crown all proper, with the motto 'Virtutis Gloria merces' (Glory is the reward of valour). Beneath the shield, on which are the initials C.R., the figure of a wild man in chains proper. Round the rim an ornamental border. The reverse is undecorated.   

 

This service is one of a number made for the family of Robertson of Struan (which family bore on a compartment beneath their arms a wild man in chains commemorating the capture of the murderer of King James I of Scotland in 1437 by the 4th Chief of the Clan. Four earlier services are illustrated in this volume (F4, V8, V14 and V17) which give detail of the family in the second half of the 18th Century, but although there is more than one Charles Robertson in earlier generations, and younger sons are mentioned in published records, there is no obvious owner of this service. The border design is, however, exactly as the Hon. East India Company service (Volume I, W12) which was delivered to the Governors of all the principal East India Stations in India at this time, and it would seem quite possible that the service was carried by Captain Thomas Robertson who commanded East Indiamen at Canton in 1797, 1800 and 1802 (although his crest is not recorded. (Howard 2003, p.656)

 

For a small cup/mug from the same service, please see:

The Robertsons claim to be descended from Crinan, Lord of Atholl, from whom sprang the royal house of Duncan I, the King of the Scots. The Robertson clan is more properly called ‘Clan Donnachaidh’ from their ancestor Duncan, who was a staunch supporter of Robert the Bruce, and who led the Clan at the Battle of Bannockburn.

The general surname of the clan Robertson was taken from Robert Riach (Grizzled Robert) the clan chief, who was known for his intense loyalty to the Stewarts. Riach was responsible for capturing the murderers of King James I, and was rewarded by the crown for this act by having his lands at Struan erected into a Barony.

 

Robert Riach

 

Robert Riach (source: www.scotclans.com)

 

The clan was also granted a symbolic memorial by additions to their coat of arms – subsequently the chief of clan Robertson bore as his crest a hand holding an imperial royal crown, and underneath a man in chains, representing the regicide. About a century later, the Robertson family lost the lands of Struan to the Earl of Atholl but the family regained them in 1606.

However in the seventeenth century, after the final defeat of James VII, all Robertson estates were forfeited and the chief of the Robertson clan joined the exiled court in France. To this day the chiefs of the clan Robertson still have the right and privilege of interment in the family burial ground at Struan. (source: www.scotclans.com)

 

For more information on the Clan Robertson (Clan Donnachaidh), please click here.

 

Condition: Three hairlines to the rim.

 

References:

Howard 2003, W12 Robertson

www.scotclans.com

www.donnachaidh.com

 

Price: € 499 - $ 617 - £ 435

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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