Pater Gratia Oriental Art

Sold Ceramics

 

Sold Mandarin wares 1750-1790

 

Page 1

This is the traditional name used in the northern Netherlands for a particular group of export porcelain dating to the second half of the 18th century. It is characterised by the decoration that shows a dense and crowded design of Chinese men ('Mandarins'), women and children in a garden, on a terrace or in an interior, all dressed in colourful garments. Apart from rose, green, brown and black enamel, a purple-violet enamel is often used. Less widespread is a combination with underglaze blue. The decoration can be detailed and precise, but on later pieces is often coarse and stereotypical, and it is frequently combined with a brown-orange enamel. Fanciful rococo-style arabesques and asymmetrical panels can surround the main scene. Larger pieces sometimes have a decoration in relief. Objects of better quality often have small cartouches filled with birds on a branch, flowering plants or landscapes, sometimes done in encre de chine. Compared to the central scenes, it is clear that different craftsmen painted them. 'Mandarin' designs frequently appear on tea and coffee wares, on dinner sets and on display pieces like vases and garnitures. ‘Mandarin’ was much appreciated in the Dutch province of Groningen. A distinction was made between 'farmer's Mandarin' which is decorated without any gold, and the more precious 'gentleman’s Mandarin' which has an extra layer of gold.

2011051
2011051

Sold Ceramics - Sold Mandarin wares 1750-1790 - Page 1

 

Object 2011051

 

Saucer

 

China

 

1740-1745

 

Height 22 mm (0.87 inch), diameter of rim 121 mm (4.76 inch), diameter of footring 75 mm (2.95 inch)

 

Saucer on footring, straight rim. Polychrome decorated in iron-red, black, gold and other overglaze enamels, with three figures outside a house on a fenced terrace with trees in the background. The first figure has a bird perched on his arm and is being watched by a second figure, standing at a table, and a third seated figure, smoking a pipe, a small dog rests beside a small table in the foreground. The reverse is undecorated. To the base a rectangular paper collectors label that reads: '24'.

  

The decoration is characteristic of the group called mandarijn (mandarin) in The Netherlands, a generic term used in the West to refer to all Chinese officials. purple, orange, yellow a hard pink and brown enamels were often added and decorations consisted mainly of Chinese figures and family scenes. In Groningen, herenmandarijn (gentlemen's mandarin), the variation with gold, as here, was regarded as suitable for the upper classes, while boerenmandarijn (farmers' mandarin), without gold was for the middle and lower classes. (Jörg 200/22, p.138)

 

Condition: Perfect with some wear to the enamels and gold.

 

Reference:

Jörg 200/22, cat. 94

 

Price: Sold.

 

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2011344
2011344

Sold Ceramics - Sold Mandarin wares 1750-1790 - Page 1

 

Object 2011344

 

Dish

 

China

 

1740-1745

 

Height 33 mm (1.29 inch), diameter of rim 161 mm (6.34 inch), diameter of footring 96 mm (3.78 inch), weight 146 grams (5.15 ounce (oz.))

 

Dish on footring, straight underglaze brown-edged rim (jia mangkou). Polychrome decorated in iron-red, black, gold and other overglaze enamels, with a family of three and a nanny/servant on a fenced terrace with trees, houses and mountains. The seated father is waving his hand while the mother is holding a teacup and looks down on their child who is standing at a table pointing his finger to the ground. The nanny/servant is standing apart from the family near a tree observing he family scene. On the table a vase with blooming flowerings and two rectangular open hard binders each containing a volume of books. The reverse is undecorated.

 

The decoration on this small dish illustrates the traditional Chinese value of education, starting from the family. Nannies or servants are often respected by the families and treated in a lot of ways as part of the family in a kind of mutual respect.

 

This type of decoration on Chinese porcelain is called 'Mandarin'. A Mandarin is a Chinese official, either civil or military, but the word itself is not Chinese, it comes from the Portuguese word mandar meaning 'to command'. Mandarin porcelain was produced in China for export in the late 18th century. It is called Mandarin because of the groups of figures in Mandarin dress that appear in the decorative panels. (source: Britannica Online Encyclopaedia)

 

The decoration is characteristic of the group called mandarijn (mandarin) in The Netherlands, a generic term used in the West to refer to all Chinese officials. Purple, orange, yellow a hard pink and brown enamels were often added and decorations consisted mainly of Chinese figures and family scenes. In Groningen, herenmandarijn (gentlemen's mandarin), the variation with gold, as here, was regarded as suitable for the upper classes, while boerenmandarijn (farmers' mandarin), without gold was for the middle and lower classes. (Jörg 200/22, p.138)

 

For an identically shaped, sized and decorated dish, please see:

Condition: Two short hairlines to the rim.

 

References:

Jörg 200/22, cat. 94

Suchomel 2015, cat. 263

 

Price: Sold.

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2010847
2010847

Sold Ceramics - Sold Mandarin wares 1750-1790 - Page 1

 

Object 2010847

 

Teapot

 

China

 

1740-1760

 

Height with cover 125 mm (5.00 inch), diameter handle to spout 198 mm (7.28 inch), diameter of mouthrim 65 mm (2.56 inch), diameter of footring 63 mm (2.21 inch)

 

Teapot on footring, domed cover with a pointed knob. Curved C-shaped handle and a straight spout. Polychrome decorated in iron-red, black, gold and other overglaze enamels, On the body two large panels filled with a child standing on a table being watched by four figures in a garden with a tree and a fence. Around the spout and handle one large and four narrow panels filled with flowering plants. The cover is decorated en suite.

 

This type of decoration on Chinese porcelain is called 'Mandarin'. A Mandarin is a Chinese official, either civil or military, but the word itself is not Chinese, it comes from the Portuguese word mandar meaning 'to command'. Mandarin porcelain was produced in China for export in the late 18th century. It is called Mandarin because of the groups of figures in Mandarin dress that appear in the decorative panels. (Britannica Online Encyclopaedia)

 

Condition: A fleabite to the tip of the spout and to the rim of the cover.

 

References:

Jörg 200/22, cat. 94

Britannica Online Encyclopaedia 

 

Price: Sold.

 

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