Pater Gratia Oriental Art

Japanese Porcelain

 

Japanese wares with Western Shapes or Designs 1653-1800

 

Page 2

Japon de commande

 

In Japan porcelain was also manufactured to order, both for private parties as well as, in a few cases, for the Dutch East India Company, (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie, VOC). The private buyers were in fact solely Dutch East India Company employees of Deshima, The Dutch trading post in Nagasaki in Souhern Japan. As only European company, The Dutch East India Company was given the monopoly to trade in Japan. Japon de commande was therefore much more exclusive than Chine de commande.

 

Striking are the blue dishes featuring the Dutch East India Company monogram on them. There is hardly any record of these specific pieces to be found in the Dutch East India Company achieves, but they were apparently often manufactured to order as the Company's 'official' tableware, which was used aboard the ships, in the trading posts all over Asia and even at the dinner table of the Governor-General of the Dutch East Indies in Batavia. Oddly enough it was never actually made in China itself, nor painted in enamel colours. Other motifs are family coats of arms, depictions of Dutch landscapes as well as of Dutch people and their ships. Also, quite striking are the bulbous flasks initialled with either their alcoholic or medicinal contents or with their owner's name. (Source: Groninger Museum)

2011632
2011632

Japanese wares with Western Shapes or Designs 1653-1800 - Page 2

 

Object 2011632

 

Chamber-pot

 

Japan

 

c.1700

 

Height 60 mm (2.36 inch), diameter of mouthrim 80 mm (3.15 inch), diameter of footring 43 mm (1.69 inch), weight 115 grams (4.06 ounce (oz.))

 

Small chamber-pot on footring, spreading rim, curved handle with thumb-rest. Decorated in red, green, black and aubergine enamels and gold with two groups of flowering gardenias growing from rockwork. Round the foot two red lines, on the inside of the rim a karakusa scroll partly in red, partly outlined in red, and divided by single flowers. On the handle a floret between scrolls.

 

For an indentically shaped, sized and decorated chamber-pot, please see:

Jörg also shows a similarly sized and decorated cuspidor. (Jörg 2003/1, p.166, cat. 193)

 

For a slightly larger chamber-pot decorated in underglaze blue, please see:

The use of this small chamber-pot is unknown. It is too large to be placed in a doll's house. In general, miniatures were included in groups of decorative porcelain placed on shelves, brackets and consoles in the Dutch interior, or in the porcelain rooms of the grand houses such as those still in Pommersfelden and Charlottenburg, Germany. Similar miniature objects were also made of silver and glass, and the pieces of Japanese (and Chinese) porcelain fit into the general trend. (Jörg 2003/1, p.190)

 

Condition: Perfect.

 

References:

Daendels 1981, cat. 124

Jörg 2003/1, p.166, p.190, cat.191 & 193

 

Price: € 1.499 - $ 1,669 - £ 1,354

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2011880
2011880

Japanese wares with Western Shapes or Designs 1653-1800 - Page 2

 

Object 2011880

 

Shaving bowl

 

Japan

 

1700-1730

 

Height 88 mm (3.47 inch), diameter of rim 275 mm (10.83 inch), diameter of footring 115 mm (4.53 inch), weight 960 grams (33.86 ounce (oz.))

 

Shaving bowl on footring a spreading flat rim, a saved semi-circular section and two small holes on the rim opposite the cut-out section. Polychrome decorated in underglaze blue, iron-red, black, green, grey and yellow enamel and gold with a jardinière filled with leafy flowering peonies. In the middle in the glaze, a large ring was left unglazed. On the rim two panels with floral scrolls in gold on a blue ground surrounded by floral scrolls reserved on an iron-red ground. On the reverse two wide spread prunus blossom sprays. 

 

Shaving bowls were used by barbers and were indispensable in the Dutch household too. They were made of earthenware, pewter, copper and even silver. They had an alternative use, namely to let blood from a vein in the arm during blood-letting, a medical procedure thought to drain bad blood from the system also performed by the barber/surgeon. In the seventeenth century, regulations were put in place in England to govern what barbers were permitted to do. Thus the became confined to bloodletting and treating external diseases. In Prussia the barbers' and the surgeons' guild joined in 1779, and it was said of great Prussian surgeons that they had risen "up from the barber's bowl'. Both purposes explain the semi-circular saving. The two holes are for a cord used to suspend it from the client's neck to catch lather and water during shaving, or to hang the bowl on the wall thus implying that owners also appreciated the bowl for its decorative value as well as its function. Chinese shaving bowls usually have the holes in the footring while Japanese examples have them in the rim. (Jörg 2003/1, p.184). (Sargent 2012, p.189)

 

On recently sold object 2011818, a smaller but similarly decorated shaving bowl, the following was published in Fraeylema Nieuws, number 52, September 2015; 'Most shaving basins are decorated in Imari, but this example was made in one of the smaller kilns which used a different technique, in which the objects were stacked on to each other in the oven while in the middle of the shaving basin, in the glaze, a large ring was left unglazed in order to prevent that the objects would stick to each other during the firing process. That ring is sometimes quite visible, on this object it is subtly hidden in the decoration in enamel colors.'

 

Condition: Some wear to the decoration and a fleabite to the rim.

 

References:

Jörg 1982/2, cat. 123

Jörg 2003/1, p.184

Sargent 2012, p.183 & p.189

Fraeylema Nieuws, number 52, September 2015

 

Price: € 799 - $ 879 - £ 718

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2010324
2010324

Japanese wares with Western Shapes or Designs 1653-1800 - Page 2

 

Object 2010324

 

Beaker vase

 

Japan

 

1730-1750

 

Height 208 mm (8.19 inch), diameter of mouth 110 mm (4.33 inch), diameter of waist 93 mm (3.66 inch), diameter of footring 70 mm (2.76 inch), weight 740 grams (26.10 ounce (oz.))

 

Beaker vase of waisted cylindrical shape with a flaring rim and a spreading lower part tapering to a takefushi-shaped foot on a footring. Imari decorated in underglaze blue, iron-red and gold with two large shaped panels reserved on a blue ground, filled with  jardinières containing flowering chrysanthemums and cherries. Around the mouthrim, two blossoming prunus branches.

 

This beaker vase was once part of a garniture which mostly consisted of three covered oviform-shaped jars and two cylindrical beaker vase with spreading mouths, all with the same decoration, They were very popular in The Netherlands and elsewhere in Europe, where they were used as decorative items in the interior. (Jörg 2003/1, p.259)

 

Condition: An unglazed part caused by the firing process, two frits and a shallow glaze chip all to the underside of the rim.

 

Reference:

Jörg 2003/1, p.259

 

Price: € 249 - $ 277 - £ 224

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2010173
2010173

Japanese wares with Western Shapes or Designs 1653-1800 - Page 2

 

Object 2010173

 

Small baluster vase with cover

 

Japan

 

1700-1720

 

Height 125 mm (4.92 inch), diameter 68 mm (2.68 inch), diameter of mouthrim 35 mm (1.38 inch), diameter of footring 35 mm (1.38 inch), weight with cover 163 grams (5.75 ounce (oz.)), weight cover 31 grams (1.09 ounce (oz.))

 

Small baluster vase on footring, domed cover with pointed knob. Imari decorated in underglaze blue, iron-red and gold. Around the foot a continuous floral scroll pattern border, on the body flowering daisy, chrysanthemum and peony plants and on the shoulder three panels filled with flowering plants reserved on a underglaze blue ground. Round the neck a pointed leaves pattern border in gold. On the cover a pointed leaves pattern border in gold with three groups of flowering chrysanthemum, peony and daisy plants, The gold pointed knob in the form of a chrysanthemum.

 

This small baluster vase with cover was once part of a garniture which mostly consisted of three covered oviform-shaped jars and two cylindrical beaker vase with spreading mouths, all with the same decoration, They were very popular in The Netherlands and elsewhere in Europe, where they were used as decorative items in the interior. (Jörg 2003/1, p.259)

  

Condition: A small chip to the underside of the cover. 

 

Reference:

Jörg 2003/1, p.259

 

Price: € 199 - $ 221 - £ 179

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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2011988
2011988

Japanese wares with Western Shapes or Designs 1653-1800 - Page 2

 

Object 2011988

 

Small beaker vase

 

Japan

 

1700-1720

 

Height 97 mm (3.81 inch), diameter 48 mm (1.89 inch), diameter of mouthrim 28 mm (1.10 inch), diameter of footring 27 mm (1.06 inch), weight with cover 82 grams (2.89 ounce (oz.))

 

Small beaker vase on footring. Imari decorated in underglaze blue, iron-red and gold. Around the foot a continuous floral scroll pattern border, on the body flowering daisy, chrysanthemum and peony plants and on the shoulder two panels filled with flowering plants reserved on a underglaze blue ground.

 

This small beaker vase was once part of a garniture which mostly consisted of three small covered oviform-shaped jars and two small beaker vases with spreading mouths, all with the same decoration, They were very popular in The Netherlands and elsewhere in Europe, where they were used as decorative items in the interior. (Jörg 2003/1, p.259)

  

Condition: a firing flaw to the base and two frits to the footring. 

 

Reference:

Jörg 2003/1, p.259

 

Price: € 199 - $ 221 - £ 179

(the $ and £ prices are approximates and depend on the € price exchange rate)

 

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