Pater Gratia Oriental Art

Sold Ceramics

 

Sold Kraak Porcelain wares 1570-1645

 

Klapmutsen

 

Page 1

Dutch merchants arrived in Asia towards the end of the 16th century. The Dutch East India Company, (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie, VOC), was founded in 1602, competed fiercely with the Portuguese as traders. Porcelain from captured Portuguese vessels (caraccas) was called kraak porcelain, a Dutch corruption of the Portuguese word. It was made especially for export in Jingdezhen, the porcelain centre in Jiangxi Province. The VOC shipped it in huge quantities and soon it was a commonplace item in Dutch interiors.

 

Kraak porcelain was primarily bought for practical use but pieces also had decorative functions. The paintings, done in underglaze blue only, show landscapes and animals, rarely human figures, making this porcelain suitable for Islamic markets, too. Buddhist and Daoist good luck symbols make up the panelled border decorations. Plates and dishes were moulded. They are thin, usually rather quickly finished and often have kiln grit adhering to the underside. The glaze on the edge is often retracted. Apart from large dishes, the bases of other objects are glazed, and the V-shaped footring is slightly undercut. Initially, the panels on kraak porcelain were raised, but this feature disappeared at the end of this period.

Bowls of this shape with a flat rim are traditionally called klapmuts in Dutch, comparing the shape with a cap with flaps. The klapmuts is mentioned in VOC records for the first time in 1608.Rinaldi states that they were specially developed to meet a demand from European customers, who wanted to be able to rest their spoons in the bowl without damaging the edge.  In fact the form was already well-known, not as shallow bowls, but as late 15th-early 16th century large and fairly deep dishes in underglaze blue or as Song and early Ming celadon saucers and dishes. The klapmuts is just another variety in the gradual development of this type. (Sheaf & Kilburn 1988, pp.38-39), (Rinaldi 1989, p.118), (Jörg & Van Campen 1997, p.60)

Klapmutsen are divided in six groups each bearing one or more typical decorative motifs.

 

Group I (c.1595-1610)

  • Rim with a running decoration of foliage, usually divided in two groups. Cavetto and walls have well-drawn panels usually with flower or peach sprays. They are usually small from 100 mm (3.93 inch) to 230 mm (9.06 inch) in diameter.

Group II (c.1595-1610)

  • Rim with a peony scroll. Cavetto and walls have well-drawn panels with early motifs such as delicately drawn flower sprays, herons and, in later pieces, auspicious symbols. They are usually between 200 mm (7.87 inch) to 230 mm (9.06 inch) in diameter.

Group III (c.1595-1610)

  • Rim with four sections with diapers and four cartouches with flower sprays. Cavetto and walls have ogival panels with delicate flower or peach sprays. A deer motif in the centre is common. The size is between 200 mm (7.87 inch) to 230 mm (9.06 inch) in diameter.

Group IV (c.1605-1645)

  • Rim with four reserves with peach or flower sprays surrounded by diapers. Cavetto and walls have ogival panels on early pieces, oval ones for later examples, filled mostly with peach or flower sprays. They are of small size: from 140 mm (5.51 inch) to about 200 mm (7.87 inch) in diameter.

Group V (c.1605-1650)

  • The most typical and common of klapmutsen. the monster mask and segments with diapers are predominant motifs on the rim. Cavetto and walls have ogival panels on early pieces, oval ones for later examples, filled with a wide variety of motifs, mostly symbols. Early examples are small, 150 mm (5.90 inch) to 210 mm (8.26 inch) in diameter, later examples from the Hatcher Cargo are as large as 270 mm (10.63 inch) in diameter.

Group VI (c.1605-1620)

  • Very large klapmutsen, 370 mm (14.57 inch) to about 500 mm (19.69 inch) in diameter, usually have three monster masks and peony scrolls on the rim. In most cases the panels on cavetto and walls have an ogival contour and are filled with symbols or peach sprays. Such vessels are rare and often of very good quality.

(source: Rinaldi 1989, p.120

2010992
2010992

Sold Ceramics - Sold Kraak Porcelain wares 1570-1645 - Klapmutsen - Page 1

 

Object 2010992

 

Klapmuts

 

China

 

1595-1610

 

Height 55 mm (2.16 inch), diameter of rim 215 mm (8.46 inch), diameter of footring 107 mm (4.21 inch)

 

Klapmuts or bowl on footring, flat rim with foliated edge. Decorated in underglaze blue. The rim is decorated with eight peonies linked by tendril-like branches with carefully drawn leaves. On the cavetto the four ogival, oblong-shaped panels are filled with a pond scene with a heron and lotus plants. The heron is only outlined, reserving the body in white against the blue leaves. This is a common motif but treated with unusual sensitivity and artistry. There are no narrow panels; the empty space between the panels is filled with series of beaded pendants ending with tassels hanging from half florets. The centre medallion is panted in the purest Chinese style with peaked mountains, pavilions and distant mountains. The exterior of this object is also unusual, under the rim are two groups, each with two prunus branches and a bird perched on one of the branches, which combine two well-known underside motifs: the prunus branches, and the bird on bifurcated branches. The four panels have the upper part with an ogival shape and follow a clearly defined moulding; each frames two flowering plants. The small flower vase, used to separate the panels instead of the vertical narrow segment, is very rarely seen.

 

According to Rinaldi this klapmuts can be classified as a group II klapmuts. The main characteristic of this rim is a peony scroll: six or, more commonly, eight, peonies are linked by S-shaped vines with small leaves forming a scroll. (Rinaldi 1989, pp.123-125)

 

Condition: A firing flaw to the inner wall and two hairlines (one L-shaped) and a chip to the rim.

 

Reference:

Rinaldi 1989, Pl.131

 

Price: Sold.

 

More pictures >>

2010278
2010278

Sold Ceramics - Sold Kraak Porcelain wares 1570-1645 - Klapmutsen - Page 1

 

Object 2010278

 

Klapmuts

 

China

 

1595-1610

 

Height 60 mm (2.36 inch), diameter of rim 210 mm (8.27 inch), diameter of footring 105 mm (4.13 inch)

 

Klapmuts or bowl on footring, flat rim with foliated edge. Decorated in underglaze blue. In the centre decoration of a bird perched on a rock next to flowers, rocks and clouds. On the cavetto four ogival, oblong-shaped panels filled with peaches and auspicious symbols, these are divided by two opposed ruyi heads, according to Rinaldi a very unusual arrangement. The rim is decorated with a peony scroll of eight peonies linked by S-shaped vines with small leaves forming a scroll. The exterior rim is even more unusual. Under the rim are two groups, each with two prunus branches and a bird perched on one of the branches, which combine two well-known underside motifs: the prunus branches, and the bird on bifurcated branches. The four panels on the exterior wall follow the same moulded contour of those inside and have an ogival shape at the top filled with peach sprays, the four narrow vertical panels have a lingzhi. The footring has been pierced.

 

According to Rinaldi this klapmuts can be classified as a group II klapmuts. The main characteristic of this rim is a peony scroll: six or, more commonly, eight, peonies are linked by S-shaped vines with small leaves forming a scroll. (Rinaldi 1989, pp.123-125)

 

A hole has been drilled in the very short footring in order to fit a wire through it - the traditional Dutch way to hang dishes on walls as display pieces. (Rinaldi 1989, p.137)

 

For a similarly decorated klapmuts or bowl, please see:

Condition: A five legged crack from the centre to the rim, a 60 mm (2.36 inch) crack and two chips to the rim and a firing flaw to the wall.

 

References:

Volker 1954, reprint 1971, Pl. III, cat. 4

Rinaldi 1989, pp.123-125, p.137 & Pl.133

 

Price: Sold.

 

More pictures >>

2011626
2011626

Sold Ceramics - Sold Kraak Porcelain wares 1570-1645 - Klapmutsen - Page 1

 

Object 2011626

 

Klapmuts

 

China

 

1595-1610

 

Provenance: Mr D.H.J. Ninck Blok, Groningen, the Netherlands.

 

Height 72 mm (2.84 inch), diameter of rim 221 mm (8.70 inch), diameter of footring 99 mm (3.90 inch), weight 505 grams (17.81 ounce (oz.))

 

Klapmuts or bowl on footring, flat rim with foliated edge. Decorated in underglaze blue with in the centre an unidentifiable rectangle symbolic design with scale patterns (Rinaldi suggests that it might be an embroidered purse) with overhanging tassels and ribbons. The four ogival panels on the sides are filled with floral motifs. The narrow panels, which cover only the sides, have beaded pendants hanging from a ruyi head and ending with a well-drawn tassel. The rim is usually divided into eight sections, four of which are decorated with diapers reserved in white on a blue ground. The fish-scale motif is usually predominant. The four diaper sections frame four reserves filled with flowers motifs and a duck in a pond. On the outside of the rim flowering-prunus-branches. The panels on outside follow the same moulded contour of those inside and have an ogival shape at the top; they are filled with flower and peach sprays. The narrow vertical panels have a lingzhi. The footring has been pierced. 

 

According to Rinaldi this klapmuts can be classified as a group III klapmuts. The rim on this type klapmutsen is usually divided into eight sections, four of which are decorated with diapers reserved in white on a blue ground. the fish-scale motif is usually predominant. The four diaper sections frame four reserves filled with small flower motifs or insects. The four ogival panels on the sides are decorated with very similar delicate motifs. The narrow panels, which cover only the sides, have beaded pendants hanging from a ruyi head and ending with a well-drawn tassel. The centre medallion is very commonly decorated with the deer-in-a-landscape motif. The outside is drawn with complex motifs. The flowering-prunus-branches seems to be the most common decorative motif painted under the rim of the klapmutsen in this group. The panels outside follow the same moulded contour of those inside and have an ogival shape at the top; they are usually filled with peach sprays. The narrow vertical panels have a lingzhi. The preference for the deer motif, coupled with factors such as the delicate flower decorations, the ogival panels and the prunus sprays under the rim, seem to indicate an early date for these pieces of 1595-1610. (Rinaldi 1989, pp.125-127)

 

A hole has been drilled in the very short footring in order to fit a wire through it - the traditional Dutch way to hang dishes on walls as display pieces. (Rinaldi 1989, p.137)

 

For similarly decorated objects, please see:

 Condition: A chip to the underside of the rim.

 

References:

Pijl-Ketel 1982, inv.no:7741

Rinaldi 1989, p.60, p.118, pp.125-127, p.137 & Pl.105

Sjostrand & Lok Lok 2007, Serial No. 6066

  

Price: Sold.

 

More pictures >>

201075
201075

Sold Ceramics - Sold Kraak Porcelain wares 1570-1645 - Klapmutsen - Page 1

 

Object 201075

 

Klapmuts

 

China

 

1605-1645

 

Height 49 mm (1.92 inch), diameter of rim 140 mm (5.51 inch), diameter of footring 66 mm (2.59 inch)

 

Klapmuts or bowl on footring, flat rim short uptuned foliated edge. Decorated in underglaze blue. In the centre two figures sitting on the ground near a river in the background mountains and clouds. On the interior wall four medallions with flowers and peaches, on the rim four medallions with flowers and peaches flanked by diaper motifs and separated by narrow panels filled with a bow hanging from a ruyi head. On the exterior wall four oval shaped medallions with four stylized flaming pearls, separated by narrower panels decorated with lingzhi. On the exterior rim three elongated flowering stems. The footring has been pierced.

 

According to Rinaldi this klapmuts can be classified as a group IV klapmuts. The decorative style of Group IV may have been adopted at quite an early stage of klapmutsen evolution, probably in the early years of the seventeenth century, but a small production continued for some years. In fact some klapmutsen with the same decorative rim motif have, in the medallion, a seated figure in a landscape which is very Transitional in style. The depiction of a human figure, coupled with the deterioration of the outside decoration (roundels with a dot in the centre), place some of these pieces in the later years of Kraak production (1635-45). (Rinaldi 1989, pp.127-129)

 

When the Dutch captured Formosa in 1624, the VOC (Dutch East India Company) provided the merchants who kept in direct contact with potters in Jingdezhen with wooden models of silver objects that they wanted to be executed in Porcelain. Furthermore, the VOC specified which sort of decoration they wanted these products to have. People were primarily keen on decoration containing Chinese figures. Such subjects, however, very seldom appear on Kraak porcelain.(Campen & Eliëns 2014, pp.55-56)

 

A hole has been drilled in the very short footring in order to fit a wire through it - the traditional Dutch way to hang dishes on walls as display pieces. (Rinaldi 1989, p.137)

 

Condition: A chip, a frit, two tiny rough spots and a tiny hairline firing flaw to to the rim, on the footring a chip and a shallow frit.

 

References:

Rinaldi 1989, pp.127-129, p.137 & Pl.137

Campen & Eliëns 2014, pp.55-56

 

Price: Sold.

 

More pictures >>

2011004
2011004

Sold Ceramics - Sold Kraak Porcelain wares 1570-1645 - Klapmutsen - Page 1

 

Object 2011004

 

Klapmuts

 

China

 

1605-1645

 

Height 45 mm (1.77 inch), diameter of rim 144 mm (5.67 inch), diameter of footring 65 mm (2.56 inch)

 

Klapmuts or bowl on footring, flat rim with short upturned foliated edge. Decorated in underglaze blue. In the centre two figures sitting on the ground near a river in the background mountains and clouds. On the interior wall four medallions with flowers and peaches, on the rim four medallions with flowers and peaches flanked by diaper motifs and separated by narrow panels filled with a bow hanging from a ruyi head. On the exterior wall four oval shaped medallions with four stylized flaming pearls, separated by narrower panels decorated with lingzhi. On the exterior rim three elongated flowering stems. The footring has been pierced.

 

According to Rinaldi this klapmuts can be classified as a group IV klapmuts. The decorative style of Group IV may have been adopted at quite an early stage of klapmutsen evolution, probably in the early years of the seventeenth century, but a small production continued for some years. In fact some klapmutsen with the same decorative rim motif have, in the medallion, a seated figure in a landscape which is very Transitional in style. The depiction of a human figure, coupled with the deterioration of the outside decoration (roundels with a dot in the centre), place some of these pieces in the later years of Kraak production (1635-45). (Rinaldi 1989, pp.127-129)

 

When the Dutch captured Formosa in 1624, the VOC (Dutch East India Company) provided the merchants who kept in direct contact with potters in Jingdezhen with wooden models of silver objects that they wanted to be executed in Porcelain. Furthermore, the VOC specified which sort of decoration they wanted these products to have. People were primarily keen on decoration containing Chinese figures. Such subjects, however, very seldom appear on Kraak porcelain.(Campen & Eliëns 2014, pp.55-56)

 

A hole has been drilled in the very short footring in order to fit a wire through it - the traditional Dutch way to hang dishes on walls as display pieces. (Rinaldi 1989, p.137)

 

Condition: A firing flaw to the exterior wall and a tiny rough spot to the rim.

 

References:

Rinaldi 1989, pp.127-129, p.137 & Pl. 137

Campen & Eliëns 2014, pp.55-56

 

Price: Sold.

 

More pictures >>

2010430
2010430

Sold Ceramics - Sold Kraak Porcelain wares 1570-1645 - Klapmutsen - Page 1

 

Object 2010430

 

Klapmuts

 

China

 

1605-1645

 

Height 49 mm (1.92 inch), diameter 140 mm (5.51 inch), diameter of footring 66 mm (2.59 inch)

 

Klapmuts or bowl on footring, flat rim short upturned foliated edge. Decorated in underglaze blue. In the centre a rare riverscape decoration with a pagoda on a mountain with trees and a pagoda with a figure on a shore. To the side rockwork with trees and in the background mountains with trees. On the interior wall four medallions with flowers and peaches, on the rim four medallions with flowers and peaches flanked by diaper motifs and separated by narrow panels filled with a bow hanging from a ruyi head. On the exterior wall four oval shaped medallions with four stylized flaming pearls, separated by narrower panels decorated with lingzhi. On the exterior rim two elongated flowering stems. The footring has been pierced.

 

According to Rinaldi this klapmuts can be classified as a group IV klapmuts. The decorative style of Group IV may have been adopted at quite an early stage of klapmutsen evolution, probably in the early years of the seventeenth century, but a small production continued for some years. In fact some klapmutsen with the same decorative rim motif have, in the medallion, a seated figure in a landscape which is very Transitional in style. The depiction of a human figure, coupled with the deterioration of the outside decoration (roundels with a dot in the centre), place some of these pieces in the later years of Kraak production (1635-45). (Rinaldi 1989, pp.127-129)

 

A hole has been drilled in the very short footring in order to fit a wire through it - the traditional Dutch way to hang dishes on walls as display pieces. (Rinaldi 1989, p.137)

 

Condition: A professional restored hairline and two frits, one to the rim and one to the inner wall, some tiny frits to the rim and firing flaws to the centre and on the base.

 

Reference:

Rinaldi 1989, pp.127-129, p.137 & Pl.137

 

Price: Sold.

 

More pictures >>

2011015
2011015

Sold Ceramics - Sold Kraak Porcelain wares 1570-1645 - Klapmutsen - Page 1

 

Object 2011015

 

Klapmutsen

 

China

 

1605-1645

 

Height 49 mm (1.93 inch), diameter of rim 145 mm (5.71 inch), diameter of footring 70 mm (2.76 inch)

 

Klapmuts or bowl on footring, flat rim short upturned foliated edge. Decorated in underglaze blue. In the centre two figures sitting on the ground near a river in the background mountains and clouds. On the interior wall four medallions with flowers and peaches, on the rim four medallions with flowers and peaches flanked by diaper motifs and separated by narrow panels filled with a bow hanging from a ruyi head. On the exterior wall four oval shaped medallions with four stylized flaming pearls, separated by narrower panels decorated with lingzhi. On the exterior rim three elongated flowering stems. The footring has been pierced.

 

According to Rinaldi this klapmuts can be classified as a group IV klapmuts. The decorative style of Group IV may have been adopted at quite an early stage of klapmutsen evolution, probably in the early years of the seventeenth century, but a small production continued for some years. In fact some klapmutsen with the same decorative rim motif have, in the medallion, a seated figure in a landscape which is very Transitional in style. The depiction of a human figure, coupled with the deterioration of the outside decoration (roundels with a dot in the centre), place some of these pieces in the later years of Kraak production (1635-45). (Rinaldi 1989, pp.127-129)

 

A hole has been drilled in the very short footring in order to fit a wire through it - the traditional Dutch way to hang dishes on walls as display pieces. (Rinaldi 1989, p.137)

 

Condition: Five glaze chips and three glaze frits to the rim,

 

Reference:

Rinaldi 1989, pp.127-129, p.137 & Pl. 137

 

Price: Sold.

 

More pictures >>

2010359
2010359

Sold Ceramics - Sold Kraak Porcelain wares 1570-1645 - Klapmutsen - Page 1

 

Object 2010359

 

Klapmuts

 

China

 

1605-1645

 

Height 47 mm (1.85 inch), diameter of rim 142 mm (5.59 inch), diameter of footring 65 mm (2.55 inch)

 

Klapmuts or bowl on footring, flat rim short upturned foliated edge. Decorated in underglaze blue. In the centre an artemisia leaf, one of the Eight Precious Symbols and a gourd (a pilgrim's bottle) one of the Daoïst Eight Immortals. On the interior wall four medallions with flowers and peaches, on the rim four medallions with flowers and peaches flanked by diaper motifs and separated by narrow panels filled with a bow hanging from a ruyi head. On the exterior wall four oval shaped medallions with four stylized flaming pearls, separated by narrower panels with lingzhi. On the exterior rim two elongated flowering stems. The footring has been pierced. 

 

According to Rinaldi this klapmuts can be classified as a group IV klapmuts. The decorative style of Group IV may have been adopted at quite an early stage of klapmutsen evolution, probably in the early years of the seventeenth century, but a small production continued for some years. In fact some klapmutsen with the same decorative rim motif have, in the medallion, a seated figure in a landscape which is very Transitional in style. The depiction of a human figure, coupled with the deterioration of the outside decoration (roundels with a dot in the centre), place some of these pieces in the later years of Kraak production (1635-45). (Rinaldi 1989, pp.127-129)

 

A hole has been drilled in the very short footring in order to fit a wire through it - the traditional Dutch way to hang dishes on walls as display pieces. (Rinaldi 1989, p.137)

 

Condition: A tiny filled chip to the rim and a glaze chip to the outside of the pierced hole in the footring.

 

Reference:

Rinaldi 1989, pp.127-129, p.137 & Pl.137

 

Price: Sold.

 

More pictures >>

2011261
2011261

Sold Ceramics - Sold Kraak Porcelain wares 1570-1645 - Klapmutsen - Page 1

 

Object 2011261

 

Klapmuts

 

China

 

1605-1650

 

Height 45 mm (1.77 inch), diameter of rim 146 mm (5.75 inch), diameter of footring 70 mm (2.76 inch)

 

Klapmuts or bowl on footring, flat rim foliated edge. Decorated in underglaze blue. In the centre an attractive decoration of a Chinese bee in flight and a Cicada (Latin for grasshopper) perched on a rock in a marshy landscape with flowering peonies and rocks. On the interior wall four medallions decorated with sunflowers and (auspicious) symbols. On the rim wide panels filled with a taotie monster mask alternating with narrow panels filled with a bow hanging from a ruyi head or beaded pendants. On the exterior wall four oval shaped medallions with angular decoration at the corners and filled with four stylized flaming pearls alternating with auspicious symbols, separated by narrower panels filled with lingzhi. On the exterior rim three elongated flowering stems.  The angular decoration at the corner of the large panels on the exterior wall is characteristic of better quality and, possibly earlier pieces.The footring has been pierced. (Pijl-Ketel 1982, pp.270-283), (Rinaldi 1989, p.131 & p.137), (Sjostrand & Lok Lok 2007, pp.273-277

 

According to Rinaldi this klapmuts can be classified as a group V klapmuts. In these klapmutsen the rim is divided into four large and four narrow panels in the most typical Kraak style The four large and slightly triangular panels are decorated with a monster mask, while the narrow sections extend, without interruption, from rim to centre medallion and are covered with a continuous design, usually a bow hanging from a ruyi head or a more elaborate motif. This group acquired its definitive stylistic shape around the fist years of the seventh century and continued to be produced in massive for the rest of the first half of the century. They are most common of all klapmutsen and were produced in almost all sizes. The mask is often referred to as taotie, on of the oldest symbols used in Chinese decoration. It was represented as early as the Shang Dynasty (1600-1100) BC on bronze and later on jade. There are many variations of the taotie mask, whose purpose was to ward off evil spirits. It is interesting to note that though referred to as a taotie, the representation on the klapmuts is, in fact, most unlike the traditional Chinese monster mask. Instead it has a definite resemblance to a gala, the mythological Indian glutton who was punished by having to eat his own body until only the mouth and upper part of the head and two tiny hands remain. (Rinaldi 1989, pp.129-133) 

 

The young cicada larva passes the first four years of its life under ground, and then comes out in the form of a mobile pupa, splits down the back and emerges a perfect insect. This rising, as it were, from the grave, was noticed by the ancient Chinese, who saw in the cicada an emblem of immortality and resurrection. The insect is also the symbol of happiness and eternal youth, as it lives longer than any other insect, its life-cycle being said to extend over seventeen years. The Chinese bee is an emblem of industry and thrift, and a crowd of people is metaphorical compared to a swarm of bees, while honey mixed with oil is a euphemism for false friendship. (Williams 1976, pp.37-38 & pp.70-71

 

A hole has been drilled in the very short footring in order to fit a wire through it - the traditional Dutch way to hang dishes on walls as display pieces. (Rinaldi 1989, p.137)

 

Condition: Perfect with some firing flaws to the exterior wall.

 

References:

Williams 1976, pp.37-38 & pp.70-71

Pijl-Ketel 1982, pp.270-283

Rinaldi 1989, p.137 & Pl.143

Hartog 1990, cat. 6

Sjostrand & Lok Lok 2007, Serial No. 4136d, 4580 & 5097c

 

Price: Sold.

 

More pictures >>

2010733
2010733

Sold Ceramics - Sold Kraak Porcelain wares 1570-1645 - Klapmutsen - Page 1

 

Object 2010733

 

Klapmuts

 

China

 

1605-1650

 

Height 56 mm (2.20 inch), diameter of rim 205 mm (8.07 inch), diameter of footring 105 mm (4.13 inch)

 

Klapmuts or bowl on footring, flat rim foliated edge. Decorated in underglaze blue. In the centre a decoration of auspicious symbols. On the interior wall four oblong medallions with flowers and auspicious symbols. On the rim wide panels filled with a taotie monster mask alternating with narrow panels filled with a bow hanging from a ruyi head. On the exterior wall four oval shaped medallions with four stylized flaming pearls, separated by narrower panels with lingzhi. On the exterior rim four elongated flowering stems.

 

According to Rinaldi this klapmuts can be classified as a group V klapmuts. In these klapmutsen the rim is divided into four large and four narrow panels in the most typical Kraak style The four large and slightly triangular panels are decorated with a monster mask, while the narrow sections extend, without interruption, from rim to centre medallion and are covered with a continuous design, usually a bow hanging from a ruyi head or a more elaborate motif. This group acquired its definitive stylistic shape around the fist years of the seventh century and continued to be produced in massive for the rest of the first half of the century. They are most common of all klapmutsen and were produced in almost all sizes. The mask is often referred to as taotie, on of the oldest symbols used in Chinese decoration. It was represented as early as the Shang Dynasty (1600-1100) BC on bronze and later on jade. There are many variations of the taotie mask, whose purpose was to ward off evil spirits. It is interesting to note that though referred to as a taotie, the representation on the klapmuts is, in fact, most unlike the traditional Chinese monster mask. Instead it has a definite resemblance to a gala, the mythological Indian glutton who was punished by having to eat his own body until only the mouth and upper part of the head and two tiny hands remain. (Rinaldi 1989, pp.129-133)

 

Condition: A chip and a chip with a connected hairline to the rim.

 

Reference:

Rinaldi 1989, pp.129-133 & Pl.143

 

Price: Sold.

 

More pictures >>

201077
201077

Sold Ceramics - Sold Kraak Porcelain wares 1570-1645 - Klapmutsen - Page 1

 

Object 201077

 

Klapmuts

 

China

 

1605-1650

 

Height 52 mm (2.04 inch), diameter of rim 105 mm (4.13 inch), diameter of footring 40 mm (1.57 inch)

 

Klapmuts or bowl on footring, flat rim with short uptuned foliated edge. Decorated in underglaze blue. In the centre a figure sitting by a fence near a shore, in the background mountains and clouds. On the interior wall four large medallions with flowers and peaches. On the rim four large medallions with a taotie monster mask separated by four narrow panels, which cover both cavetto and rim uncharacteristically left bare of decoration, normally these narrow panels would have been decorated with a bow hanging from a ruyi head.  The exterior wall is decorated with four medallions with stylized flaming pearls, separated by narrower panels filled with lingzhi. On the exterior rim two elongated flowering stems.

 

According to Rinaldi this klapmuts can be classified as a group V klapmuts. In these klapmutsen the rim is divided into four large and four narrow panels in the most typical Kraak style The four large and slightly triangular panels are decorated with a monster mask, while the narrow sections extend, without interruption, from rim to centre medallion and are covered with a continuous design, usually a bow hanging from a ruyi head or a more elaborate motif. This group acquired its definitive stylistic shape around the fist years of the seventh century and continued to be produced in massive for the rest of the first half of the century. They are most common of all klapmutsen and were produced in almost all sizes. The mask is often referred to as taotie, on of the oldest symbols used in Chinese decoration. It was represented as early as the Shang Dynasty (1600-1100) BC on bronze and later on jade. There are many variations of the taotie mask, whose purpose was to ward off evil spirits. It is interesting to note that though referred to as a taotie, the representation on the klapmuts is, in fact, most unlike the traditional Chinese monster mask. Instead it has a definite resemblance to a gala, the mythological Indian glutton who was punished by having to eat his own body until only the mouth and upper part of the head and two tiny hands remain. (Rinaldi 1989, pp.129-133)

 

When the Dutch captured Formosa in 1624, the VOC (Dutch East India Company) provided the merchants who kept in direct contact with potters in Jingdezhen with wooden models of silver objects that they wanted to be executed in Porcelain. Furthermore, the VOC specified which sort of decoration they wanted these products to have. People were primarily keen on decoration containing Chinese figures. Such subjects, however, very seldom appear on Kraak porcelain.(Campen & Eliëns 2014, pp.55-56)

 

Condition: A very tiny fleabite to the rim and a glaze chip to the inner footring.

 

References:

Rinaldi 1989, pp.129-133 & Pl.146

Campen & Eliëns 2014, pp.55-56

 

Price: Sold.

 

More pictures >>

2010206
2010206

Sold Ceramics - Sold Kraak Porcelain wares 1570-1645 - Klapmutsen - Page 1

 

Object 2010206

 

Klapmuts

 

China

 

1605-1650

 

Height 50 mm (1.96 inch), diameter of rim 104 mm (4.09 inch), diameter of footring 40 mm (1.57 inch)

 

Klapmuts or bowl on footring, flat rim with short upturned foliated edge. Decorated in underglaze blue. In the centre a figure sitting by a shore, in the background mountains and clouds. On the interior wall four large medallions with flowers and peaches. On the rim four large medallions with a taotie monster mask separated by four narrow panels, which cover both cavetto and rim uncharacteristically left bare of decoration, normally these narrow panels would have been decorated with a bow hanging from a ruyi head.  The exterior wall is decorated with four medallions with stylized flaming pearls, separated by narrower panels filled with lingzhi. On the exterior rim two elongated flowering stems.

 

According to Rinaldi this klapmuts can be classified as a group V klapmuts. In these klapmutsen the rim is divided into four large and four narrow panels in the most typical Kraak style The four large and slightly triangular panels are decorated with a monster mask, while the narrow sections extend, without interruption, from rim to centre medallion and are covered with a continuous design, usually a bow hanging from a ruyi head or a more elaborate motif. This group acquired its definitive stylistic shape around the fist years of the seventh century and continued to be produced in massive for the rest of the first half of the century. They are most common of all klapmutsen and were produced in almost all sizes. The mask is often referred to as taotie, on of the oldest symbols used in Chinese decoration. It was represented as early as the Shang Dynasty (1600-1100) BC on bronze and later on jade. There are many variations of the taotie mask, whose purpose was to ward off evil spirits. It is interesting to note that though referred to as a taotie, the representation on the klapmuts is, in fact, most unlike the traditional Chinese monster mask. Instead it has a definite resemblance to a gala, the mythological Indian glutton who was punished by having to eat his own body until only the mouth and upper part of the head and two tiny hands remain. (Rinaldi 1989, pp.129-133)

 

When the Dutch captured Formosa in 1624, the VOC (Dutch East India Company) provided the merchants who kept in direct contact with potters in Jingdezhen with wooden models of silver objects that they wanted to be executed in Porcelain. Furthermore, the VOC specified which sort of decoration they wanted these products to have. People were primarily keen on decoration containing Chinese figures. Such subjects, however, very seldom appear on Kraak porcelain.(Campen & Eliëns 2014, pp.55-56)

 

Condition: A spreading hairline from the rim, four other spots with tiny spreading hairlines and a chip to the inner footring.

 

References:

Rinaldi 1989, pp.129-133 & Pl.146

Campen & Eliëns 2014, pp.55-56

 

Price: Sold.

 

More pictures >>